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Very Interesting Article

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I've been trying to research epigenetics and Celiac (I'm sure there's a link, and it would explain why genetics test don't predict Celiac Disease too well), and this was the closest thing I found; It is a very interesting way to look at wheat in the human diet, and discusses the 'Celiac Iceberg'...why some people have it and don't know, why some people think they have it but can't get a positive diagnosis, etc.

I don't know if this link will post correctly...but it's worth a try!!

http://Spammers Use This To Link To Spam.com/?The-Dark-Side-of...&id=1818855

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Oh, and if anyone knows of any articles regarding epigenetics and celiac disease, let me know!!

Thanks!

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Interesting article. Suddenly, I feel "lucky"! Thanks for posting this

Susan

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That is a damn fine article! I like the way this was written to show how our bodies are having a HEALTHY response to an UNHEALTHY food! Grand!

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Great article, thanks for posting this.

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This was the most interesting and informative article I have ever read on the effects of wheat and its various amino acid chains and peptides on our bodies. It really does make one wonder if the FDA does not have tongue in cheek (or hand in national pocket) when recommending wheat consumption by the general populace. When I consider my religious adherence to whole wheat bread, to wheat germ, to wheat-based cereals, it really makes me cringe what I was doing to my body. And my mother's insistence on the eating of Vimax (hot wheat cereal),Weetbix, and all the other things that used to give me tummy aches at school. I was telling her even back then, but to no avail--"Eat it, it's good for you!" Ha! :rolleyes:

q

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That was a good article. I feel my pcp, whom I have only seen once since Dec. 2006 and after 10 months diagnosed, would not buy into it. Probably not all his fault, its just that for generations people have been told that it is good for you. Hopefully articles and more studies like this will change the way we (as a population) view what we eat. I definately think twice about the food I consume now.

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Many thanks for posting the link to the article. It contains an interesting and valuable perspective.

One question for general response:

At the end of the article (the paragraph immediately preceding the conclusion), glutamic acid is mentioned in a negative light. How does that correlate to L-glutamine which has been put forward by some as something that may promote intestinal healing?

A quick search found an article that described glutamine as an amide of glutamic acid. I found a definition of an amide but it is over my head.

Thanks again.

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At the end of the article (the paragraph immediately preceding the conclusion), glutamic acid is mentioned in a negative light. How does that correlate to L-glutamine which has been put forward by some as something that may promote intestinal healing?

A quick search found an article that described glutamine as an amide of glutamic acid. I found a definition of an amide but it is over my head.

That part about glutamic acid set off some alarm bells in my head too. For some reason I did not take the L-glutamine my ND recommended. Maybe it's just as well??? :huh:

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Hope this clears things up concerning L-glutamine; I don't think supplements are necessary, especially since the supplements might not exactly mimic the naturally made L-glutamine in your body.

Quoted from website (listed below)

L-glutamine is the most prevalent amino acid in the blood. Human cells readily manufacture L-glutamine and under normal circumstances, dietary intake and production of L-glutamine is sufficient. However, in times of stress or increased energy output, the body's tissues need more L-glutamine than usual, making supplementation important.

L-glutamine can be found in beans, brewer's yeast, brown rice bran, dairy products, eggs, fish, legumes, meat, nuts, seafood, seeds, soy, whey, whole grains and beet root.

Scientists also believe that deficiency in L-glutamine may be linked to gastrointestinal disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome, Crohn's disease, and colon inflammation. Supplementation may improve symptoms of these disorders while supporting overall health of the intestines.(4, 5)

One of L-glutamine's most important functions involves the support of cellular energy, growth and repair.

Finally, because L-glutamine supports the growth of new cells, it may be useful in the enhancement of wound healing. Wounds such as burns, surgical and traumatic wounds, cuts, and others may heal faster with supplementation.(12, 13)

http://content.nhiondemand.com/psv/monoAll...e=ds&mtyp=4

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That part about glutamic acid set off some alarm bells in my head too. For some reason I did not take the L-glutamine my ND recommended. Maybe it's just as well??? :huh:

Would you be willing to share info about the recommendation of your ND? I would be very interested in recommended dosage (i.e. milligrams), frequency (times per day) and how long the L-glutamine should be taken (i.e. one week, one month, indefinitely).

The reason I ask is that I found one article on the web that said that the OTC capsules contained amounts of L-glutamine that were too low to be beneficial.

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Would you be willing to share info about the recommendation of your ND? I would be very interested in recommended dosage (i.e. milligrams), frequency (times per day) and how long the L-glutamine should be taken (i.e. one week, one month, indefinitely).

The reason I ask is that I found one article on the web that said that the OTC capsules contained amounts of L-glutamine that were too low to be beneficial.

I will have to go back and check it out; will get back to you.

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That was fascinating! The section about kidney disease was especially interesting to me. I was diagosed with a kidney disease back at a time when I was trying to reintroduce gluten grains (spelt, not wheat) into my diet. The disease completely went into remission when I went fanatically gluten-free and I have not had a problem for 5-1/2 years. I've had people tell me that it was just a coincidence, but this article gave my theory about what helped me some credence!

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That was fascinating! The section about kidney disease was especially interesting to me. I was diagosed with a kidney disease back at a time when I was trying to reintroduce gluten grains (spelt, not wheat) into my diet. The disease completely went into remission when I went fanatically gluten-free and I have not had a problem for 5-1/2 years. I've had people tell me that it was just a coincidence, but this article gave my theory about what helped me some credence!

I did not know what to make of the part about kidney disease. I have borne the diagnosis CKD for five years now, made in my still-eating-gluten days when my RA was being treated with diclofenac and sulfsalazine. They told me that the diclofenac had shut my kidneys down, that I was practically in kidney failure, and have always since then had problems with creatinine and BUN levels. But I have just been told by a nephrologist that my kidneys are actually in pretty good shape and are functioning much better than the tests suggest. I don't know if the gluten played any part in any of this because I had not been on the diclofenac for very long and had certainly not exceeded any dosages :blink: :blink:

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I will have to go back and check it out; will get back to you.

I am sorry, I have looked, but could not find the bottle; maybe I threw it out or perhaps did not even buy it... it was a while ago.

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I am sorry, I have looked, but could not find the bottle; maybe I threw it out or perhaps did not even buy it... it was a while ago.

Thanks for checking.

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If you did find this article interesting, you might want to read 'Ishmael' by Daniel Quinn...the book is a bit hard to get into at first, (published at least a decade ago) but it describes the idea of that the 'agriculture revolution' wasn't necessary the best idea.. (aka wheat and dairy as we know it). Wheat was the easiest grain to grown, and cows were the easiest animal to tame, therefore, our culture was grown upon these ideas...when I first read this article, 'Ishmael' was the first book I thought of...

Shannon

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I don't see the link! Just a link about spammers link here.... COuld you repost it? Sounds so interesting..

thanks.

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I don't see the link! Just a link about spammers link here.... COuld you repost it? Sounds so interesting..

thanks.

That's all I get too, looks like the moderators pulled it, perhaps? After everyone raved about it? WHY??

Tried inserting various links, none of them seemed to work from this site. It would be nice to at least be told WHY.

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