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Asharia

How Big Of A Problem Is Cc With Canned Products?

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I am trying to figure out sources of cross contamination in products I use, and I am not sure how diligent I need to be with canned foods that don't have any gluten ingredients - for example, fire-roasted tomatoes or refried beans, or even just plain black beans!

It seems like CC would be more likely with a brand that makes tons of stuff(like Trader Joe's or 365) than a more specialized brand?

If you are super sensitive, what brands do you prefer?

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Dear Asharia,

Hello & welcome to the forum! I was sensitive at first (18 months), but it seems like my autoimmune system is starting to simmer down. During the first year I had a few more obstacles.

Soy, dairy and corn kicked me right in the gut. I'm good with dairy now, haven't tried reintroducing corn or soy. I also had problems with quinoa and oats. My reactions were so severe that I'll probably never try them again, but that doesn't mean that you will a problem with those grains. I find plenty of good things to eat without those grains! There are so many good things we can eat without problems.

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There can definitely be gluten cc issues with canned goods, but at least in my experience, it depends on the product and the brand quite a bit.

Some brands make a lot of their products in the same facility, so that can up the risk. But some companies that make a lot of products have separate facilities for separate products. Often seems to depend on the product's popularity. Canned tomatoes, for example, sell enough that they are often made in facilities completely devoted to processing tomatoes (same can be said of olive oil, often).

Soups I would be more wary of, as I imagine they are more likely to be made in facilities and on lines that are shared with other soups, which could be gluten cc'd

Beans may have the same issue. I'd check out the company. Some of the big companies like Heinz, Hunts, etc... will let you know what they consider gluten free. I'll admit, I've had a hard time with beans, because the DRIED beans seem to so often be processed in facilities that process wheat. I don't know if the canning companies get their beans from similar places, but it could be an issue, if you are really sensitive.

If you are super sensitive, what brands do you prefer?

I have given up on canned goods, at this point. I've just gotten sick too many times. I get buy dry beans, wash them with soap and water in a wire mesh collander, and make them myself. I know of one sensitive gentleman who was having good luck with many of the dried beans at Albertsons, so that wasn't too expensive. I'm getting the veggies fresh now and making stuff myself...very, very slowly, LOL.

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Welcome to the Board!

When you first begin the Gluten Free Diet after some time with major digestive issues, it may be an etended time to restore order to your digestive system. Every food, whether gluten free or not, will be bothersome.

Eat simply, eat fresh and don't worry about cross contamination.

Learn to read labels and listen to your body as you reach toward the road to recovery....life is out there. :D

Take one step at a time!

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There can definitely be gluten cc issues with canned goods, but at least in my experience, it depends on the product and the brand quite a bit.

Gluten Free canned goods are normally the least of my concerns. I would seek other possible cross contamination sources.

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Hi, Asharia! Welcome to the board. :D

I see that you are trying to figure out your elevated antibody issues that have resurfaced and that you are seeking input from those that consider themselves super sensitive. With my disclaimer that our family is super sensitive, we have found that we needed to eliminate most of our canned goods. I have had "gluten free" labelled canned beans turn up positive in a gluten detection home test that I use. For beans, we now buy our dry beans in bulk from a GFCO certified source, test them per our household quality assurance program (our supply has tested negative for gluten to date), and then wash them thoroughly.

For tomatoes, we greatly reduced our reliance on canned tomato products produced by others by producing a large amount of tomato sauce from a carefully sourced supplier that was willing to discuss and disclose growing practices of their food. Someone recently reported on Muir Glen's response to their inquiry, and it was hardly confidence building: .

If you read the 20 PPM thread, I feel that there are plenty of people advocating that you should reduce all of this "processed food" consumption and do most of the processing yourself. I haven't figured out a safer way to feed my super sensitive family than to do just that - process almost all of our own food. It was truly eye opening to get back to the basics of ensuring proper whole foods sourcing!

I agree with the eat simply, eat fresh, although eating fresh would have been far more difficult for me during other periods in my life . . . not sure what your current circumstances are. But I disagree about not worrying about cross contamination. I haven't checked, and you specifically asked here about products, but have you done a thorough review of all of the other potential sources of cross contamination? We didn't get to the canned foods issue until we had been gluten free for a few years, and we were trying to address some underlying, complicating issues. Do you have a shared kitchen / living space? Have you replaced and maintained all of the necessary kitchen items? Have you made any changes in your personal care, toiletries, or makup items? And the Amy's and Trader Joes stuff that you mention in another thread - we had to drop both of those long before we noticed any issues with a minority of the canned goods that still end up on our shelves occasionally!

Good luck figuring this out, and I hope that your antibody levels return to normal soon!

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Thanks for all of your thoughts - although I am disappointed that there is not something not completely fresh that I don't have to worry about :) It does seem like cutting out Trader Joes and Amy's products are a good start, but part of me just wants to go all the way to make sure I start feeling better sooner. Thinking about going all non-processed is as stressful as going gluten-free was in the beginning for me, 4 years ago. Unfortunately, I don't like to cook, but perhaps that has to change.

I have tried to be very careful with other things - I know my toiletries and shampoos are ok, and I live alone and no gluten has touched my toaster oven or strainer, although I used to live with gluteny roommates - but supposedly you can wash gluten off of most things. The Tums and Zantac I eat like candy are too! Even my dog is (mostly) gluten-free :)

What about frozen veggies!?

Hi, Asharia! Welcome to the board. :D

I see that you are trying to figure out your elevated antibody issues that have resurfaced and that you are seeking input from those that consider themselves super sensitive. With my disclaimer that our family is super sensitive, we have found that we needed to eliminate most of our canned goods. I have had "gluten free" labelled canned beans turn up positive in a gluten detection home test that I use. For beans, we now buy our dry beans in bulk from a GFCO certified source, test them per our household quality assurance program (our supply has tested negative for gluten to date), and then wash them thoroughly.

For tomatoes, we greatly reduced our reliance on canned tomato products produced by others by producing a large amount of tomato sauce from a carefully sourced supplier that was willing to discuss and disclose growing practices of their food. Someone recently reported on Muir Glen's response to their inquiry, and it was hardly confidence building: .

If you read the 20 PPM thread, I feel that there are plenty of people advocating that you should reduce all of this "processed food" consumption and do most of the processing yourself. I haven't figured out a safer way to feed my super sensitive family than to do just that - process almost all of our own food. It was truly eye opening to get back to the basics of ensuring proper whole foods sourcing!

I agree with the eat simply, eat fresh, although eating fresh would have been far more difficult for me during other periods in my life . . . not sure what your current circumstances are. But I disagree about not worrying about cross contamination. I haven't checked, and you specifically asked here about products, but have you done a thorough review of all of the other potential sources of cross contamination? We didn't get to the canned foods issue until we had been gluten free for a few years, and we were trying to address some underlying, complicating issues. Do you have a shared kitchen / living space? Have you replaced and maintained all of the necessary kitchen items? Have you made any changes in your personal care, toiletries, or makup items? And the Amy's and Trader Joes stuff that you mention in another thread - we had to drop both of those long before we noticed any issues with a minority of the canned goods that still end up on our shelves occasionally!

Good luck figuring this out, and I hope that your antibody levels return to normal soon!

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Just a quick note here:

Tums-all are gluten-free except as noted below

Tums Smoothies-Most varieties of TUMS Smoothies are gluten free. Only

TUMS Smoothies Cocoa and Cream contain gluten (5/5/2011)

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Not to scare Newbies:

For most Celiacs, canned & frozen veggies are fine. Just read the ingredients. There is very little reason for most of us to worry.

Your first post on here didn't specify you have been gluten-free for years and having problems. You must have said that somewhere else. We do have a section for super sensitives that might be worth you taking a look at. :)

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I am trying to figure out sources of cross contamination in products I use, and I am not sure how diligent I need to be with canned foods that don't have any gluten ingredients - for example, fire-roasted tomatoes or refried beans, or even just plain black beans!

It seems like CC would be more likely with a brand that makes tons of stuff(like Trader Joe's or 365) than a more specialized brand?

If you are super sensitive, what brands do you prefer?

I just answered your other thread. If I had your issues with celiac antibodies staying high for no reason, I would stop eating processed foods. Period. Get the antibodies to go down and then start to figure out what you can tolerate. You can tell there is no gluten in a scrubbed, whole tomato. You can't tell if there is a trace of gluten in a can of them without testing. Most of us tolerate canned foods just fine, but I think you need to get back to basics.

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On 25/09/2011 at 8:30 PM, T.H. said:

I'll admit, I've had a hard time with beans, because the DRIED beans seem to so often be processed in facilities that process wheat. I don't know if the canning companies get their beans from similar places, but it could be an issue, if you are really sensitive.

The reason there is often a "may contain wheat" statement on dried/canned legumes, as far as I know, is because it is extremely common for legumes to be grown in a crop rotation cycle with gluten grains (on the same field but at different times) because growing them in rotation can help enhance the production of each crop. I would assume that it's also common for the two crops to be processed in shared facilities, but it's important to note that even if beans/other legumes are processed in a facility that doesn't deal with gluten items, there can still be a significant risk of cross-contamination if the legumes are grown on shared fields, as is apparently quite commonly practiced. 

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