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Jefferson Adams

Jefferson Adams is a freelance writer living in San Francisco. His poems, essays and photographs have appeared in Antioch Review, Blue Mesa Review, CALIBAN, Hayden's Ferry Review, Huffington Post, the Mississippi Review, and Slate among others.

He is a member of both the National Writers Union, the International Federation of Journalists, and covers San Francisco Health News for Examiner.com.

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 Articles by this Author


Image: CC--Robert Ashley

Long ignored and dismissed as unscientific and crude, are intestinal worms destined to be the future of autoimmune disease treatments?

Hookworms. Intestinal parasites. They sound gross. The thought of having one's gut infected with a parasitic worm generally makes people's skin crawl. Indeed, intestinal worms, like hookworm, have a bad reputation among health experts, and have been the subject of fierce public health campaigns seeking their eradication. However, researchers have also documented the gut healing abilities of parasites like hookworm.



Respiratory Infections and the Risk of Celiac Disease? Photo: CC--Natasha Meyers

Many researchers feel that the rising number of celiac disease cases supports the idea that common infections prior to the onset of autoimmune diseases could play a role in triggering the immune response. Do more respiratory infections in childhood mean a greater likelihood of celiac disease later in life?

To answer that question, a team of researchers recently set out to explore the relationship between early clinical events and the development of celiac disease in genetically predisposed infants.



Photo: CC--Christopher Aloi

Pork chops are one of the best things grill. Brine is the key. These pork chops are brined in buttermilk, so they cook up tender and juicy. Buttermilk and brine are the key to these tender, juicy grilled pork chops.



Is your water gluten-free? Photo: CC--Taro Taylor

Is your water hip? Is your water cool? Is your water gluten-free? Does it say so on the label? Does it matter?

Gluten-free has become such a marketing buzzword that the words "gluten-free" are now appearing on all kinds of things that most certainly gluten-free, such as, yes, bottled water.

Would you be more likely to buy water labeled "gluten-free?" Would you feel safer? More nourished?



Colonial Williamsburg. Photo: CC--Ron Cogswell

Facing charges that it forced a young boy with gluten-intolerance to eat outside in the rain, the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation has issued an official statement in which it denies violating any laws or mistreating an 11-year old Maryland boy with a food allergy, while he was eating in Shields Tavern with a school group in May, according to a filing Monday in U.S. District Court.

The lawsuit, filed by a Maryland family, alleges that Colonial Williamsburg violated federal and state law by discriminating against the boy, referred to as J.D. in court documents, by not allowing him to eat his food inside Shields Tavern May 11. The suit further contends that the boy was forced to eat alone in the rain.



Photo: CC--Matt Brown

Are we at the beginning of the end for celiac disease? The last few years have seen numerous advances in celiac diagnosis and treatment. People diagnosed recently and in the future face a very different world than that faced by celiacs just five or ten years ago.

In the old days, the process of properly diagnosing involved blood tests, endoscopies, and biopsies. In the near future, a simple blood test may do the trick.



Will new tests change the way we diagnose and treat celiac disease and diabetes? Photo: CC--AJC1

The FDA has granted clearance for Immco Diagnostics' ELISA for celiac disease, and for Roche's Benchtop Analyzer. What does that mean?

Immco's test is conducted as a solid phase immunoassay and is intended for the qualitative or semiquantitative detection of IgA or IgG antigliadin antibodies in human blood, and thus to aid in diagnosing patients with celiac disease or dermatitis herpetiformis in conjunction with other laboratory and clinical findings.



Photo: CC--Kevan

It’s summer and the consumer market reports are flying. Most of them project major growth in the gluten-free market and its numerous components over the next decade.

The latest is a report by Grand View Research, Inc., which projects rising incidences of celiac disease, diabetes, and obesity across developed economies will help to drive the global gluten-free products market to USD 33.05 billion by 2025.

In addition, the rising consumer awareness of celiac disease and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is expected to aid product demand.



Gluten-free foods are now mainstream store products. Photo: CC: Bruce Szalwinski.jpg

Gluten-free food is now so mainstream that its lack of gluten is no longer a highlight, but is now just another of the many ways manufacturers signal a healthy product.

Gluten-free has gone from specialty niche to mainstream, says David Sprinkle, research director of the market research firm Packaged Facts.



Photo: CC--Ren Kuo

Did you know that it's not uncommon for many McDonald's stores in Europe to offer gluten-free buns?

If you're lucky enough to find yourself in Europe any time soon, here's a quick list of European countries where you can get Gluten-Free McDonald's Buns. Remember, not every McDonald's location offers gluten-free options, so always check first.



Inflammatory diet linked to brain aging. Photo: CC--GreenFlame09

Researchers think they may have discovered an important connection between diet and dementia.

For the first time, they have tied a specific dietary pattern to blood markers for inflammation. In addition, they showed that elderly adults who followed a certain dietary pattern had reduced brain gray matter volume, and worse visuospatial cognitive function.



Eggplants and chickpeas anchor a great stew. Photo: CC--Alice Henneman

This light, yet hearty eggplant chickpea stew is a tasty way to a heart-healthy meal. It goes great over rice. Eggplants and chickpeas anchor a great stew.




Image: CC--m01229

Are Cheerios really "Not safe for celiacs?" Or is General Mills getting a bad rap? 

A recent story by Buzzfeed ignited confusion over whether Cheerios and other General Mills cereals are actually gluten-free and safe for people with celiac disease.




Photo: CC--Joey Zanotti

The human gut is home to a huge and diverse number of microorganisms that perform various biological roles. Disturbances in a healthy gut microbiome might help to trigger various inflammatory diseases, such as multiple sclerosis (MS).

Human gut-derived commensal bacteria suppress CNS inflammatory and demyelinating disease. Can they improve the treatment of multiple Sclerosis (MS)?



Are gluten-free foods and snacks too salty? Photo: CC-- Ian Watson

High salt levels have some questioning the healthiness of gluten-free foods. Recent products tests show that the vast majority of gluten-free snacks tested are far saltier than their non-gluten-free alternatives, say researchers.

Just how much saltier? Researchers surveyed a total of 106 products, and found that many gluten-free snacks have up to five times more salt than non-gluten-free counterparts.



Can a blood test change the way we diagnose celiac disease? Photo: CC--Keepingtime_CA

Doctors attempting to diagnose celiac disease are often confronted by patients who have already given up gluten. For such patients, diagnostic guidelines currently call for a gluten challenge of at least 14 days, followed by duodenal biopsy. There isn't much good data on how many false-positive results are generated by this method. To get a better picture, a team of researchers recently studied responses to 14-day gluten challenge in subjects with treated celiac disease.



Grilled portobello mushrooms make a tasty treat. Photo: CC-- Goamick

These delicious Portobello mushrooms are easy to prepare, and sure make a hit at the next cookout. Next time you feel like tossing a bunch of stuff on the grill, be sure to include these. A few herbs and spices, and a dash of olive oil and you are ready to go. Grilled portobello mushrooms make a delicious, naturally gluten-free treat.



Users of Olmesartan have reached a 300 million dollar deal with drug-maker Daiichi Sanykyo. Photo: CC--Joe Gratz

Japanese drug maker Daiichi Sankyo will pay $300 million to settle thousands of federal and state court lawsuits over its top-selling blood pressure drugs, Benicar, Benicar HCT, Azor and Tribenzor, according to the lead Plaintiffs' lawyers.

The settlement was reached in the federal multi-district litigation (MDL) case titled In re: Benicar (Olmesartan) Products Liability Litigation, MDL 2606, pending in the U.S. District Court for the District of New Jersey, Camden Division.



Colleges struggle to provide a truly gluten-free dining experience for students. Photo CC--Connor Turner

While many schools have worked to create dedicated gluten- and allergen-free dining space, a number of colleges and university seem to be lagging. For students on many campuses, the gluten-free revolution can't come fast enough.

Recent stories about gluten-free dining halls have become common. Kent State and Cornell establishing the countries first certified gluten-free college eatery in the U.S.

Colleges with issues in providing suitable gluten-free facilities for their students include Seattle University, with a growing student body of over 4,500 students, and more students with specific dietary preferences.



Photo: CC--Clare Black

Is non-celiac wheat sensitivity a persistent condition? A team of researchers recently set out to assess how many patients with a diagnosis of non-celiac wheat sensitivity (NCWS) still experienced symptoms of wheat sensitivity after an average follow-up time of 99 months.

Using data collected from 200 participants from a previous study of NCWS, performed between July and December 2016 in Italy, the team found that 148 of these individuals still followed a strict wheat-free diet.