No popular authors found.
Ads by Google:

Categories

No categories found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter





Ads by Google:


Follow / Share


  FOLLOW US:
Twitter Facebook Google Plus Pinterest RSS Podcast Email  Get Email Alerts
SHARE:

Popular Articles

No popular articles found.
Celiac.com Sponsors:

Jefferson Adams

Jefferson Adams is a freelance writer living in San Francisco. His poems, essays and photographs have appeared in Antioch Review, Blue Mesa Review, CALIBAN, Hayden's Ferry Review, Huffington Post, the Mississippi Review, and Slate among others.

He is a member of both the National Writers Union, the International Federation of Journalists, and covers San Francisco Health News for Examiner.com.

(Page 1 of 93)   
« Prev
  
1
  2  3  4  5  Next »

 Articles by this Author


Can early infections in infants lead to celiac disease? Photo: CC--CaptMikey

In previous studies, a team of scientists led by Professor Anette-Gabriele Ziegler had already shown an association between infections in early childhood and the development of type 1 diabetes. In that study, the researchers saw the highest risk for type 1 diabetes in children who experienced repeated respiratory infections in the first six months of life.

Recently, Zeigler and another team of colleagues from the Institute for Diabetes Research at Helmholtz Zentrum München, a partner in the German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD), set out to determine whether infections during infancy are associated with increased risk for celiac disease later on.



UK National Health Service has announced cuts to gluten-free prescriptions. Photo: CC--SludgeG

In the face of budget cuts, and in a move that may offer a glimpse of things to come, doctors with the the UK's National Health Service are eliminating gluten-free food prescriptions for adults, beginning in parts of Devon.

As of July 1, the Northern, Eastern and Western Devon Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) responsible for planning and buying the majority of healthcare services for local people have recommended limiting gluten free foods including bread, pasta, flour and multipurpose mixes, to under 18 years of age.



Finland has one of the world's highest celiac rates, and gluten-free food is common. Photo: CC--Sepi V.

Ever wondered what life is like in the celiac disease capital of the world?

In Finland, an estimated 2.4 percent of adults from 30 to 64 years old, and one in 99 children are diagnosed with celiac disease. The country also holds the record for the most overall cases of the celiac disease in the world. If ever there was a world headquarters for celiac disease, it would be Finland.



Lamb Chops offer a tasty deviation from the grilling norm. Photo: CC--The Boreka Diary

It's summertime and the grilling is easy. Lamb chops make a tasty, high protein, low fat alternative to standard steak or burger fare. This recipe is easy to make, and guaranteed to taste delicious. Lamb Chops offer a tasty deviation from the grilling norm.



Why is it still so hard to make good gluten-free food? Photo: CC--Andreanna Moya

What are the main challenges in developing good gluten-free foods?

With the explosion of gluten-free products, food manufacturers have worked to master the challenges of formulating gluten-free products that are both tasty and nutritious.

This effort has paid dividends in the last years is due, in part, to advances in formulation, ingredient sourcing, and a focus on making products delicious.



Grilled pineapple is a always a crowd pleaser. Photo: CC--David Reber

Want to be a star at your next cookout? Try this easy trick for grilled pineapple. Watch as it disappears and the smiles become contagious. Grilled pineapple is a always a crowd pleaser.



Can blood tests alone accurately diagnose celiac disease? Photo: CC--Garland Cannon

Until recently, duodenal biopsy was considered the gold standard for diagnosing celiac disease, but that is changing.

A number of studies have shown that celiac disease can be diagnosed using serological tests alone, but many clinicians have yet to embrace this approach.

In both retrospective and prospective studies, one research team showed that certain IgA-tissue transglutaminase antibodies levels can predict celiac disease in adults 100% of the time.



Zeus, an Australian Shepherd like the one pictured here, has learned to warn its owner if food contains gluten. Photo: CC--Paul Schadler

Humans rely on powerful canine noses to do so many things, including sniffing for drugs, bombs and even cancer.

Now, some dogs are being trained to serve their masters by sniffing out gluten.

Trained to help some of the 3 million Americans who have celiac disease, gluten sniffing dogs can be a tremendous boon to their owners, especially those who are highly sensitive.



Image: CC--kuchenkainternetowa

A UK man has filed a lawsuit against a local bar and grill after becoming sick on a gyro salad that servers led him to believe was gluten-free.

The Webster Groves resident, Phillip "Gus" Wagner alleges that servers at Michael's Bar & Grill in Manchester, provided inaccurate information about the dish, and that he suffered an adverse reaction to the gluten in the dish that left him with "severe and permanent injuries."



A new FDA compliance survey shows over 99 percent of gluten-free foods meet FDA standards. Photo: CC--a.mina

For anyone with celiac disease or gluten intolerance who was wondering how well food manufacturers are complying with FDA standard for gluten-free labeling, or wondering exactly how gluten-free is my gluten-free food, some early answers are in, and the news looks good.

A recent report by the agency indicates that the vast majority of food manufacturers are getting it right, and, correcting where they do get it wrong.



Chic-fil-A has introduced its new gluten-free bun. Photo: CC--M01229

Fast food chain Chic-fil-A chain has announced the launch of a gluten-free bun. This means that people with celiac disease can now enjoy something like the full Chick-fil-A experience.

Made from quinoa and amaranth, the 150-calorie buns will cost an extra $1.15, according to a report by Fortune magazine, which also noted that patrons must assemble the sandwich themselves to lessen the risk of cross-contamination.



A recent study tracked rates of celiac disease and type 1 diabetes in youth on three continents. Photo: CC--Pete

Numerous researchers have documented a connection between celiac disease and type 1 diabetes.

One team of researchers recently set out to examine international differences in celiac disease rates and clinical characteristics of youth with coexisting type 1 diabetes and celiac disease compared with type 1 diabetes only.



Photo: CC--Bormang2

Once upon a time, maintaining a gluten-free diet was a challenge, especially for college kids. In many ways, it still is, as college students face numerous challenges that others do not.

However, things are changing, and much of that change is being driven by colleges and universities seeking to better serve their students with food sensitivities and allergies. More and more, colleges in America are doing more to step up their food services for their students with food allergies and sensitivities.



Photo: CC--Niaid.jpg

Refractory celiac disease (RCD) is a serious complication of celiac disease. There are two types, RCD I, and RCD II. Unlike RCD type I, RCD type II often leads to enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma (EATL), which is associated with clonally expanding T-cells that are also found in the sequentially developing EATL.

Using high-throughput sequencing (HTS), a team of researchers recently set out to establish the small-intestinal T-cell repertoire (TCR) in CD and RCD to unravel the role of distinct T-cell clonotypes in RCD pathogenesis.



An undergraduate researcher hopes her project will help people adjust more easily to having celiac disease. Photo: CC--Jimmy James

Calgary University's Faculty of Arts and Markin Undergraduate Student Research program is designed to give recipients a leg up on research projects that can help advance their academic goals.For one such recipient, Karen Tang, those goals include helping individuals "to effectively self-manage celiac disease and follow a strict gluten-free diet, by teaching people evidence-based strategies."



Photo: CC--Micolo J.

A team of researchers recently set out to document trends in diagnosis of celiac disease among patients from a single centre from 1958–2014, and and to provide data on rates and numbers of cases in those born in Derby city over 4 decades. The team also sought to explore a possible connection between deprivation and prevalence and characteristics of celiac disease in Asians.



Photo: CC--Max.Pixel

Tests to measure serum endomysial antibodies (EMA) and antibodies to tissue transglutaminase (tTG) were developed to screen for celiac disease in patients who are actively eating gluten.

However, doctors often use them to monitor patients on a gluten-free diet. Now, making sure celiac patients are successfully following a gluten-free diet is important, as unconscious gluten ingestion can lead to complications over time. But how accurate are these tests for assessing gluten-free compliance in celiac patients?



What can gene cells tell us about potential gut damage in people with celiac disease? Photo: CC--Brian Smithson

What can gene cells tell us about potential gut damage in people with celiac disease? Can they be harnessed to paint an accurate picture of what's going on in the gut?

A team of researchers recently set out to study autoimmunity and the transition in immune cells as dietary gluten induces small intestinal lesions. Specifically, they wanted to know if a B-cell gene signature correlates with the extent of gluten-induced gut damage in celiac disease.



Photo: CC--Pascal

Designed to reduce or eliminate symptoms of gluten contamination in gluten-sensitive individuals, the product known as AN-PEP, marketed in the U.S. as Tolerase G, is a prolyl endoprotease enzyme, derived from Aspergillus niger, that has shown promise in breaking down gluten proteins.

The latest news comes in the form of a small study that shows the enzyme to be effective in the stomach itself, where harshly acidic conditions render many enzymes ineffective.



Blood oranges form the base of a tasty sauce for this pork chop dish. Photo: CC--Jinx

This easy to make recipe marries the flavors of blood orange, soy sauce, ginger and garlic with chicken to deliver a tasty gluten-free entrée. The result is a delicious Asian-style pork chop in which the juice of the marinade blends with juice from blood oranges to make a delicious sauce.