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Jefferson Adams

Jefferson Adams is a freelance writer living in San Francisco. He has covered Health News for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com. His work has appeared in Antioch Review, Blue Mesa Review, CALIBAN, Hayden's Ferry Review, Huffington Post, the Mississippi Review, and Slate, among others.

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Corn gluten is gluten-free, not a danger to pets, livestock or people. Photo: CC--USDA

A quick glance at many pet and livestock food labels will show that they contain corn gluten feed (CGF) and corn gluten meal (CGM).

But don't worry. Unlike wheat, barley and rye, corn is naturally gluten-free, as are corn gluten feed and corn gluten meal, says Randy Wiedmeier, livestock specialist with University of Missouri Extension.

Addressing concerns from people with celiac disease and/or gluten-intolerance over the presence of corn gluten in their livestock feed, Wiedmeier stressed that "Corn gluten meal is a byproduct of processing corn. There is no true gluten in corn, but simply corn proteins."



Photo: CC--Naturalflow

Amaranth is naturally gluten-free and usually safe for people with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity.

Amaranth is not actually a grain, but is considered a pseudo-cereal like it's cousin, quinoa. Both are part of the same large family that includes beets, chard and spinach.

Amaranth is highly nutritious, and contains about one-third more protein than rice, sorghum, or rye. It also contains high levels of calcium, iron, potassium, magnesium, and fiber, together with a nearly perfect amino acid profile.



Image: CC--sevier medical art

Will a new treatment enable people with celiac disease to ditch a gluten-free diet?

About one in a hundred people in the United States is affected by celiac disease. If you're one of them, you know how hard it can be to maintain a strict gluten-free diet.

Everyone's got their horror stories about trying to simply eat a meal, only to have a tiny amount of gluten wreck havoc on their digestive system.



Photo: CC--Brian

It's not uncommon for people with celiac disease to have other medical conditions, including liver disease, glossitis, pancreatitis, Down syndrome, and autism.

By the same token, people with one or more of these associated disorders can be at greater risk for having or developing celiac disease. Until recently, though researchers didn't have much good data on the numbers behind those risk levels. A new database study of more than 35 million people changes that.



The finished green chile chicken pozole. Photo: CC--Stu Spivack

Pozole, pozole, pozole. Pozole seems to be popular lately. Pozole is a hominy-based Mexican stew closely associated with the Pacific-coast state of Guerrero.

I've noticed a number of references to pozole lately. I've seen articles touting pozole in place of traditional turkey dinner for Thanksgiving, and articles about using leftover Thanksgiving turkey to make pozole.

This tasty recipe calls for chicken, but you can easily substitute turkey, leftover or otherwise. When stewed in chicken broth and other tasty ingredients like tomatillos, green chiles.



Photo: CC--Red Carpet Report on Mingle Media TV

Talk about handling a celiac disease diagnosis in style. This past summer, "Us" star Mandy Moore showed us how its done, when she documented the process of working with her doctor to determine if she had celiac disease.

She even posted a photo of her endoscopy visit for her Instagram followers. Moore captioned the post:

"Grog city. Just had an upper endoscopy to officially see whether or not I have celiac (only way to officially diagnose)…things are looking 👌)."



Photo: CC--Gruyere

Wellington's Victoria University is the first institution of its kind in New Zealand to receive a full Celiac accreditation for its residence dining halls.

Under a new partnership between Coeliac NZ and Compass, the company that provides food and support services to the six residence Halls at Victoria, the university achieved gluten-free accreditation through independent auditing company SGS in August 2017.



Photo; CC-- Tony Alter

A Miami teenager has created what may be the nation's first kosher gluten-free food bank.

Diagnosed with celiac disease at just 7 years old, Aaron Kredi has worked to help numerous newly diagnosed celiac children in South Florida as they switch to gluten-free food.

When he started working with the Jewish Community Services Kosher Food Bank in North Miami Beach, he noticed that residents with celiac disease had very few gluten-free choices.



Image: CC--David Bruce Jr.

For centuries, physicians have used cannabis to treat numerous disorders. Modern research shows that various cannabis compounds can alleviate symptoms from numerous conditions, including neurological disorders, cancer, rheumatism, epilepsy, sexual disorders, pain, among others.

Many people with celiac disease suffer from neuropathy, which causes nerve pain, among other symptoms. Neuropathy can be difficult to treat. Nerve pain is a debilitating symptom that can significantly impair a patient's quality of life. Could a new cannabis patch change that?

In a modern take on an ancient herbal remedy, researchers are working to develop a patch made from cannabis compounds that can effectively treat various types of neuropathy, including that associated with celiac disease.



Photo: CC--MBTrama

Do you have an emergency survival kit at home should disaster strike? Does that include drinking water and gluten-free provisions for at least a few days?

The fallout from the latest string of disasters still looms over parts of America; over Houston, Florida and neighboring states devastated by Hurricanes and by resulting floods; and over northern California communities devastated by wildfires.

That got us thinking about emergency kits. Gluten-Free-free emergency kits, to be precise.

What's in Your Emergency Gluten-Free Food Kit? 



Can carpal spasm be an early sign of celiac disease in some cases? Photo: CC--University of Liverpool Faculty Health Life Sciences

Can carpal spasm be an early sign of celiac disease in some cases? A team of physicians recently reported on the case of a 3-year-old Albanian girl who presented at their clinic with carpal spasms and hand paresthesia.

She was suffering from carpal spasms and paresthesias of her extremities.



Now serving gluten-free buns! Photo: Wikimedia Commons--Michael Rivera

Jersey Mike's Subs sandwich chain is known for its in-house baked bread, and tasty submarine sandwiches. To offer gluten-free buns for its customers, Jersey Mike's has partnered with Udi's. Starting in December, Denver-based Udi's will provide fully cooked, individually wrapped gluten-free buns at all 1,320 Jersey Mike's locations nationwide.

The Udi's gluten-free bun will cost customers about an extra $1.50 for regular gluten-free subs and $3 for "giant" subs, according Jersey Mike's chief operating officer Mike Manzo.



Image: CC--Miguel B

People who do not have celiac disease, but who have celiac-like symptoms that improve on a gluten-free diet are prime candidates for a condition called non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS).

Researchers don't know much about the condition. There are no biomarkers, so they can't just do a blood test. People with this condition often experience celiac-like symptoms. Many of people with non-celiac gluten sensitivity see their symptoms improve on a gluten-free diet. However, these people may also have puzzling sensitivities to other foods that just don't seem to add up. Interestingly, foods with gluten often contain fructans, a type of fermentable oligo-, di-, monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAPs). Fructan is one such compound. Could fructan be the culprit?



Buckwheat is actually closely related to rhubarb. Photo: CC--Ervin Strauhmanis

Just looking at its name, one might wonder if buckwheat is safe for people on a gluten-free diet.

However, unlike its name, buckwheat does not naturally contain any wheat or gluten. As a result, buckwheat is generally safe for people with celiac disease on a gluten-free diet.

Turns out that buckwheat and wheat are from different, unrelated botanical families. As with quinoa, buckwheat is the seed of a flowering plant, as such it is not considered a grain or a cereal.



The finished quinoa salad. Photo CC--Tomatoes and Friends

Quinoa is actually a seed, but let's not allow taxonomy to come between us and dinner. For our purposes, the fact that quinoa is not a grain may be appropriate, because this salad recipe is not a salad in the traditional sense of lettuces ad vegetables. In fact, this dish is more of a fruit salad with beans and quinoa. Whatever you call it, it's delicious.

Toasting your quinoa before cooking before cooking enhances the delicately nutty flavor. Rinsing it well removes the bitter outer coating of saponin.



Photo: CC--Alisha Vargas

If people with celiac disease hope to avoid complications, then it's important for their gut mucosa to heal. However, besides biopsy, there is currently no good way for doctors to assess that a patient has healed enough to experience full remission.

A team of researchers recently set out to assess the role of a point-of-care test (POCT) based on IgA/IgG-deamidated gliadin peptide, in detecting persistent villous atrophy in celiac disease.

This is what they found.



Quinoa, as seen in the salad, is generally safe for people with celiac disease. Photo: CC--Stacy Spensley

Quinoa is regarded as safe for people with celiac disease. For many years, some celiac support groups listed quinoa as unsafe due to cross-contamination concerns. But any grain is unsafe for celiacs if it is contaminated with wheat, rye or barley. Some grains have a higher risk of such contamination, others have a low risk.

Based on its low risk for cross-contamination, Celiac.com has had quinoa on our safe list since 1995. A vast amount of evidence supports that listing.



Photo: CC--Quinn Dombrowski

One reason conventional beers remain unsafe for people with celiac disease is that they contain gluten that push the finished product over the 20ppm standard for gluten-free products. Such gluten fragments in conventional beers render them unsuitable for people with celiac disease or gluten intolerance.

There's been some confusion about the best ways to measure gluten levels in fermented foods and beverages. That confusion has prompted more confusion over the methods used to remove gluten from beers brewed with traditional barley. Are such beers gluten-free and safe for people with celiac disease?



Photo: CC--NIAID

ImmusanT, Inc., the company working to develop a therapeutic vaccine to protect HLADQ2.5+ patients with celiac disease against the effects of gluten, presented data that shows a way to tell the difference between celiac disease (CeD) and non-celiac gluten-sensitive (NCGS) based on cytokine levels.

Professor Knut Lundin, University of Oslo, presented the data at United European Gastroenterology (UEG) Week 2017.



The gluten-free graveyard is full of great companies that didn't survive. Photo: CC--Kicki Zeilon

Gluten-free foods are more popular than ever, and the range of choices and the availability of gluten-free products continues to expand.

One of the more significant changes in the last few years has been the entry of major players in a market once dominated by small companies. General Mills has taken their ubiquitous Cheerios line gluten-free, and is now one of the largest manufacturers of gluten-free food in the U.S.