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Wow, it has to be the celiac disease! I have ridges and they aren't going anywhere but haven't been gluten free for that long either. I am just glad that it's from this as I was really going crazy trying to figure out why my nails looked so bad! I believe it is some malabsorbtion problem too. thanks everyone!

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I too have these vertical ridges and some bumps in my nails. Have had them for as long as I can remember. I've only been gluten-free for a short while, so we'll see if they get better. My nails and hair have always been brittle...and my hair has been thin and fine. I'm crossing my fingers that it'll be better as my diet improves. Nail question for someone though--I have these little pinky toenails, and they ALWAYS split all the way through the nail bed, all the way down. It's like they grow with the split in them. What sucks is eventually I'll catch the smaller part of the nail on something pull it up, and then I have to cut it back and it's like I cut off a part of my toenail entirely! It's painful. Anyone else have this issue?

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I too have these vertical ridges and some bumps in my nails. Have had them for as long as I can remember. I've only been gluten-free for a short while, so we'll see if they get better. My nails and hair have always been brittle...and my hair has been thin and fine. I'm crossing my fingers that it'll be better as my diet improves. Nail question for someone though--I have these little pinky toenails, and they ALWAYS split all the way through the nail bed, all the way down. It's like they grow with the split in them. What sucks is eventually I'll catch the smaller part of the nail on something pull it up, and then I have to cut it back and it's like I cut off a part of my toenail entirely! It's painful. Anyone else have this issue?

I just took off my toenail polish and.....I have a deep ridge crack on big toe I can remember having something similar on my pinkie toe that you mentioned. I started on the iron. Ate steak and spinach last night. Bathroom was good today. :)

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I have ridged fingernails. I heard there's a connection with my juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. One of the first things my rheumatologist said to me was to point out my long fingers and ridged nails - both idicators for JA and RA. I wonder if it could be an indicator for autoimmune disease in general?

I have had the ridges for as long as I can remember. I never really thought much about them til now, just filed and buffed to make them look better.

I'm very curious about the RA thing. My son has extremely long fingers and toes. People have always commented on them. Next time I see him, I will check for ridges, too. He doesn't have RA, but now I will worry about him getting it. My daughter has Behcet's Disease (rare auto immune disease) and I will check her fingernails, too. I'm curious about the ridges being signs of any auto immune disease.

I wish the doctors knew more about these diseases...

Marlene

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my thumb nails have always been ridged horizontally and in the past year or so, some of my other nails have developed ridges. They also crack very easily and have white spotting. I've been gluten-free for 6 mths now and on iron for 12 and not noticed any difference. I'm wondering if malabsorbtion is still a problem for me or if there's something else I'm missing - maybe I need more B vits.

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My nails have been a problem for years. I had the same as most, white spots, no moons, ridges, weak and splitting, nail polish eats away nail. I found my B12 deficiency first so started taking mega doses of sublingual Methylcobalamin and B complex which helped some.

I went gluten-free in June 2005 but didn't start taking mega Vitamin D (2000IU a day) until January and it seems to be helping as my nails do not have white spots anymore and I see moons in all fingers. It is summer and I am getting more sunshine so it will be interesting to see what happens when winter comes again. I was never tested for Vitamin D deficiency before going gluten-free but at 7 months into the diet I was a 36 with (range 10-60) and much info on the internet states the levels will be changed soon to a new low of 30. After taking mega D from January to May, I only raised my levels to 38....this is not very high but I do see a little difference in my nails.

I wonder how many Celiacs have low vitamin D because they have not changed the low levels yet and therefore are not flagged.

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My nails have been a problem for years. I had the same as most, white spots, no moons, ridges, weak and splitting, nail polish eats away nail. I found my B12 deficiency first so started taking mega doses of sublingual Methylcobalamin and B complex which helped some.

I went gluten-free in June 2005 but didn't start taking mega Vitamin D (2000IU a day) until January and it seems to be helping as my nails do not have white spots anymore and I see moons in all fingers. It is summer and I am getting more sunshine so it will be interesting to see what happens when winter comes again. I was never tested for Vitamin D deficiency before going gluten-free but at 7 months into the diet I was a 36 with (range 10-60) and much info on the internet states the levels will be changed soon to a new low of 30. After taking mega D from January to May, I only raised my levels to 38....this is not very high but I do see a little difference in my nails.

I wonder how many Celiacs have low vitamin D because they have not changed the low levels yet and therefore are not flagged.

celiac disease, thanks, that is great info. I have been taking extra D and making more efforts to get the sunshine. I do feel the sun is so healing. I feel better after getting some. LL

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Guest Robbin

This is very interesting, I have had horizontal ridges, vertical ridges, splitting, thin nails for my whole life and for the first time in my life have thumb nails that are not bending and reach to the tips of my thumbs. I still have soft nails on the other fingers, but I think it is a start. I've been gluten-free since Jan. and am slowly noticing things like this.

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Holy crap, where did my moons go?!?! I only have them on 3 nails now! What does a lack of moons mean?

I think celiac disease is saying the increase of Vit D helped. I have been increasing mine --July 14th I had 4 moons today I have 6. LL

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Since I am not sure about what fingernail polish to use, my nails are bare and I have ridges(lines) on the nails especially the middle fingers and thumbs. I remember my favorite grandmother had these. Did anyones nutritionist, doctor, or anyone have insight on this? Thanks, LindaLee

Lindalee -

One cause for nail ridges believed by holistic and nutritionally-informed physicians, as well as naturopaths, is a lack of hydrochloric acid (HCl) in the stomach. When this is deficient, there is is generally poor ability to digest proteins and, therefore, often insufficient amino acids absorbed by the body. Also, if the parietal cells which produce hydrochoic acid are damaged, one is also generally deficient in intrinsic factor which is necessary to digest Vitamin B12 and folic acid.

A physician who is a member of ACAM (American College for Advancement in Medicine) or a naturopath should be able to help you with a diagnosis and follow-up with this matter.

Also, see a book entitled Why Stomach Acid is Good for You by Jonathan Wright, MD.

It's a very important concern and something that affects your overall health in the same sense that gluten intolerance does, and so is well worth pursuing. The ridges are only one small manifestation of the many, many problems that can be caused by lack of HCl.

Good luck.

Marcia

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Lindalee -

One cause for nail ridges believed by holistic and nutritionally-informed physicians, as well as naturopaths, is a lack of hydrochloric acid (HCl) in the stomach. When this is deficient, there is is generally poor ability to digest proteins and, therefore, often insufficient amino acids absorbed by the body. Also, if the parietal cells which produce hydrochoic acid are damaged, one is also generally deficient in intrinsic factor which is necessary to digest Vitamin B12 and folic acid.

A physician who is a member of ACAM (American College for Advancement in Medicine) or a naturopath should be able to help you with a diagnosis and follow-up with this matter.

Also, see a book entitled Why Stomach Acid is Good for You by Jonathan Wright, MD.

It's a very important concern and something that affects your overall health in the same sense that gluten intolerance does, and so is well worth pursuing. The ridges are only one small manifestation of the many, many problems that can be caused by lack of HCl.

Good luck.

Marcia

Thanks Maria, I haven't heard that little "gurgling sound" until yesterday. I am in the process of searching for a doctor. Will check out that book also. LL

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Since I am not sure about what fingernail polish to use, my nails are bare and I have ridges(lines) on the nails especially the middle fingers and thumbs. I remember my favorite grandmother had these. Did anyones nutritionist, doctor, or anyone have insight on this? Thanks, LindaLee

Hey!

I'm and Esthetician (different spelling in the states) so I had to study long and hard about Nail diseases and Disorders.

These Vertical/Longitudinal Ridges or furrows in your nails are known as Corrugations. They Can be Caused by Psoriasis, poor circulation, lacking diet, or emotional stress, injury to nail cells close to the matrix, applying too much pressure with a cutical pusher, hormonal imbalance (such as pregnancy), rheumatism, and acidity. Can be normal in older people. The lengthwise corrugations are normal for adults and will continue to increase with age. To lessen the appearance of these corrugations you may buff the ridges smooth with a 3-way file or block buffer! Don't have a block buffer or 3-way file? Then head out to get a manicure (but only to spas that follow the proper sanitization and sterilization procedures! for example that clean their tools (with chemicals that will kill virus' such as aids) between EVERY client and NEVER re-use even a nail file from one client to the next!)

Hope that helped!!

, Mandy :D

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Hey!

I'm and Esthetician (different spelling in the states) so I had to study long and hard about Nail diseases and Disorders.

These Vertical/Longitudinal Ridges or furrows in your nails are known as Corrugations. They Can be Caused by Psoriasis, poor circulation, lacking diet, or emotional stress, injury to nail cells close to the matrix, applying too much pressure with a cutical pusher, hormonal imbalance (such as pregnancy), rheumatism, and acidity. Can be normal in older people. The lengthwise corrugations are normal for adults and will continue to increase with age. To lessen the appearance of these corrugations you may buff the ridges smooth with a 3-way file or block buffer! Don't have a block buffer or 3-way file? Then head out to get a manicure (but only to spas that follow the proper sanitization and sterilization procedures! for example that clean their tools (with chemicals that will kill virus' such as aids) between EVERY client and NEVER re-use even a nail file from one client to the next!)

Hope that helped!!

, Mandy :D

Thanks, Mine must be from malabsorption-can I pick one up at a beauty supply? I have mine on toes too-it can't be AGE :angry: I'm still blonde and beautiful :P LL

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This is an old post but I thought I would share this INFO.

Biotin deficiency can cause ridges in the nails. And in my case, a loss of my hair, including my eyebrows.

I found this interesting article online. It would behoove all Celiac's to reed this.

http://www.beyondveg.com/cordain-l/grains-...-1a.shtml#intro

Ill post the pertinent portion of the article here but i highly recommend reading the whole article.

Biotin deficiency and the case of Lindow Man

Lindow Man, whose preserved body was found in a peat bog in Cheshire, England in 1984, is one of the more extensively studied of the so-called "bog mummies" [stead, Bourke, and Brothwell 1986]. The principal last meal of Lindow Man likely consisted of a non-leavened whole-meal bread probably made of emmer wheat, spelt wheat, and barley. Unleavened whole-grain breads such as this represented a dietary staple for most of the less-affluent classes during this time. Excessive consumption of unleavened cereal grains negatively impacts a wide variety of physiological functions which ultimately present themselves phenotypically (i.e., via changes in physical form or growth). The well-documented phytates of cereal grains sequester many divalent ions including calcium, zinc, iron, and magnesium, which can impair bone growth and metabolism. Further, there are antinutrients in cereal grains which directly impair vitamin D metabolism [batchelor 1983; Clement 1987]; and rickets are routinely induced in animal models via consumption of high levels of cereal grains [sly 1984].

Less well-appreciated are the ability of whole grains to impair biotin metabolism. My colleague, Bruce Watkins [Watkins 1990], as well as others [blair 1989; Kopinksi 1989], have shown that biotin deficiencies can be induced in animal models by feeding them high levels of wheat, sorghum, and other cereal grains. Biotin-dependent carboxylases are important metabolic pathways of fatty-acid synthesis, and deficiencies severely inhibit the chain-elongation and desaturation of 18:2n6 (linoleate) to 20:4n6 (arachidonic acid). Human dietary supplementation trials with biotin have shown this vitamin to reduce fingernail brittleness and ridging that are associated with deficiencies of this vitamin [Hochman 1993].

Careful examination of the photograph of Lindow's man fingernail (still attached to a phalange of the right hand [stead 1986, p. 66]) shows the characteristic "ridging" of biotin deficiency. It is likely that regular daily consumption of high levels (>50% daily calories) of unleavened cereal-grain breads, which Lindow man may have consumed, caused a biotin deficiency, which in turn caused nail ridging.

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I had vertical ridges in my fingernails and horizontal dips in both my thumbnails--they have completely gone away at one year+ gluten-free.

Patti.......4 years off gluten now and are your nails really all flat now with no ridges?

Check out this link: Fingernails and Nutrition

thanks Julie

4 years and i still have terrible ridges

i'll re read Julies article.

judy

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