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Juliet

Quick, Easy, Tasty Bread

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I recently got this new cookbook from Williams Sonoma. It's great - the person who wrote it originally worked on regular gluten-filled cookbooks for Williams Sonoma (among others) and was a columnist for the San Francisco Chronicle's food section for awhile. She was diagnosed with Celiac Disease and completelly re-taught herself how to cook. She has this one recipe for "flaxmeal skillet bread", that I've adapted slightly, that is just great when you're in a pinch to make some bread. It's good for sandwiches (kind of like a focaccia bread sandwich), dipping in soup, topping with good cheese, or eating it by itself (my kids' preferred way of eating). It doesn't make a whole loaf of bread, but when you need something in a pinch (30 minutes or less), it's great!

Flaxmeal Skillet Bread

This is adapted from The Wheat-Free Cook - Gluten-Free Recipes for Everyone

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Thanks for posting this- it sounds really good!!


-Sarah

--Son, Lucas, age 7. Gluten-free since May 2007

--Son, Ezra, age 5. Gluten-free 10/13/07. Bipolar tendencies, massively improved on gluten-free diet! He's also allergic to a jillion antibiotics.

--My mother has Celiac Disease, dx'ed by Positive Blood Tests and Biopsy. Diagnosed Sarcoidosis 6/08.

--Myself, Gluten-free since 8/07

Time heals all hurt of heart... but time must be won.

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This does sound very good.

I have been thinking about a savory bread made with baking powder instead of yeast. There are some wheat (i keep spelling it what instead of wheat!) recipes for a quick bread - sandwhich bread. I need to look those up.


~Barb

Gluten Free October 18, 2007

YIPPEE for Gluten free

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I LOVE FLAX!!! Thank thank you for sharing that recipe.. I miss my Williams-Sonoma recipes B)


Collette

Positive Bloodwork Oct 1st 2007. Gluten-free 3 YEARS Oct 1st!

Dairy & Soy free since Dec 1st 2007.

Potato free since January 3rd 2008.

Remaining Nightshades since April 1st 2008. Back on September 2010. :)

Developed Rice & Tapioca & Corn Intolerances...

NO Carageenan.

In a constant state of evolution... sending love! :)

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I made this recipe today and IT WAS AWESOME!!! It was so good, my family gobbled it down and I have already made another loaf!

I used Annalise Roberts' brown rice flour mix (well, my version of it: 3 cups brown rice flour, 3 cups white rice flour, 2 cups potato starch, 1 cup tapioca starch, all mixed up in and kept in an airtight bin) instead of the brown rice/potato starch combination. I used an 8" x 8" square metal baking dish. The first batch, I didn't have yogurt or buttermilk, so I used about 1/3 cup sour cream and then added enough milk to = 3/4 cup. I also added a teaspoon of yeast just for the yeasty flavor. The second time, I added a bit more baking soda, as it did seem a bit dense the first time.

Okay, it's not as fantastic as Laurie's Lorka Bread--that still reigns as gluten-free Bread Supreme. But this is a close second, and it's so quick and easy, for the time being, at least, it will become our daily bread!

Oh, the possibilities--garlic and rosemary for focaccia, dill and maybe cheddar or shredded swiss, hmmm, maybe making it in big muffin tins (filled like 1/3 full) for quickie hamburger buns...

Thank you, thank you, thank you for posting this!!!! I will send a copy to every gluten-free person I know, it's so good!!!!!

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Thanks for the recipe! I've made it twice in the last week. The first time I used soured milk as a buttermilk substitute and that seemed to work fine. The second time I used broth instead of milk because we had a lactose intolerant guest. It worked great! I might try the yeast trick next time because the baking soda shines through a bit.

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I tried this today with 1/2 cup dairy-free sour cream substitute plus 1/4 cup almond milk to sub for the dairy. And I added a teaspon of yeast for flavor.

It turned out good. Nice flavor. DS dipped it in olive oil. I put homemade pizza sauce on top with mozzarella for a quick pizza.

I'm going to make it in my "muffin-top" pan for hamburger buns. It's a lot fluffier than the Pamela's bread mix that I previously used for hamburger buns. They were dense and heavy.

Plus it's quick and easy -less than 25 minutes start to finish. Thanks Juliet

~Laura


Diagnosed by biopsy 2/12/07. Negative blood tests. Gluten-free (except for accidents) since 2/15/07. DQ2.5 (HLA DQA1*05:DQB1*0201)

Son, age 18, previously delayed growth 3rd percentile weight, 25th percentile height (5'3" at age 15). Negative blood work. Endoscopy declined. Enterolab positive 3/12/08. Gene results: HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201 HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0503 Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,1(Subtype 2,5) Went gluten-free, casein-free 3/15/08. Now 6'2" (Over six feet!) and doing great.

"Great difficulties may be surmounted by patience and perseverance." Abigail Adams (1744-1818) 2nd First Lady of the United States

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I've been making this for several months as our "daily bread," and I've adapted a few things that seem to work well.

I double the recipe and make it in a glass 9" x 13" pan that I spray with PAM and dust with cornmeal.

I use twice the amount of baking powder called for, and instead of the rice flour and potato starch, I use whatever rice flour mix I have on hand (usually betterbatter flour, which contains xanthan gum, so that cuts out a step).

I also use a tablespoon of sugar instead of a teaspoon (which means I use two tablespoons when I double the recipe).

I add a teaspoon of yeast (two teaspoons when I double the recipe, of course), not so much for rise, though it does help it have a lighter texture, but for flavor (and it smells like heaven when it is baking!).

Sometimes I sub in 1/4 cup of almond meal for part of the flour.

If I have them, I sprinkle the top with sesame seeds.

This also works well in muffin tins for mini hamburger buns.

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I recently got this new cookbook from Williams Sonoma. It's great - the person who wrote it originally worked on regular gluten-filled cookbooks for Williams Sonoma (among others) and was a columnist for the San Francisco Chronicle's food section for awhile. She was diagnosed with Celiac Disease and completelly re-taught herself how to cook. She has this one recipe for "flaxmeal skillet bread", that I've adapted slightly, that is just great when you're in a pinch to make some bread. It's good for sandwiches (kind of like a focaccia bread sandwich), dipping in soup, topping with good cheese, or eating it by itself (my kids' preferred way of eating). It doesn't make a whole loaf of bread, but when you need something in a pinch (30 minutes or less), it's great!

Flaxmeal Skillet Bread

This is adapted from The Wheat-Free Cook - Gluten-Free Recipes for Everyone


Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden and I will give you rest. Matthew 11:28

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YES...I finally got to try this bread. So simple. So easy. So good. I made one batch with Bob's gluten-free flour mix (in place of the brown rice and potato starch) and 1 batch with Carol's. Both worked fine. I subbed powdered buttermilk for the liquid as directed on the Saco box. I put in 1 tsp. yeast like the other recipe said to do (not for rising). And sprinkled sesame seeds on top. One pan makes 4 pieces that you slice in order to have 8 slices. When done baking, it looks like a cake ;)

This has become a favorite of mine. I mixed up a 4-batch mix of the dry ingredients, and so I only have to spoon out what I need. I usually make a half-recipe and make it on my large muffin pan, which makes 2 rolls the size for hamburger buns. I really got tired of eating a bunless burger when others are eating buns, especially during summer cookout season.

I also make it to have foccacia-type sandwiches. Yum. If I wasn't trying to lose weight I'd eat them more often!

~Laura


Diagnosed by biopsy 2/12/07. Negative blood tests. Gluten-free (except for accidents) since 2/15/07. DQ2.5 (HLA DQA1*05:DQB1*0201)

Son, age 18, previously delayed growth 3rd percentile weight, 25th percentile height (5'3" at age 15). Negative blood work. Endoscopy declined. Enterolab positive 3/12/08. Gene results: HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201 HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0503 Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,1(Subtype 2,5) Went gluten-free, casein-free 3/15/08. Now 6'2" (Over six feet!) and doing great.

"Great difficulties may be surmounted by patience and perseverance." Abigail Adams (1744-1818) 2nd First Lady of the United States

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This bread it great and SO EASY. I've made it a few times (with yeast). My daughter loves it, we've used it for sandwiches, grilled cheese, and french toast. I highly recommend it.


Holly

DD5: juveline rheumatoid arthritis 8/07; celiac 3/08

DS3: negative blood tests

Me and DH: negative blood tests

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