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AliB

Specific Carbohydrate Diet (SCD)

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I'm going to pop in here with a new topic. I just discovered that my container of sea salt contains dextrose. Aaghh!!! Why, oh why do they put sugar in salt??? Tomorrow I go to the store and try to find some sugar-free salt.

And, I called th Solaray people to find out if their sublingual B12 is gluten-free, an they said NO. It is made with sorbitol which can be made from wheat. Geesh.

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I am sure that a deficit of zinc and particularly D would have an impact on the muscles, and possibly even the BP.

To quote from the Vegetarian Society's site, 'Zinc has a range of functions. It plays a crucial role in growth and cell division where it is required for protein and DNA synthesis, in insulin activity, in the metabolism of the ovaries and testes, and in liver function. As a component of many enzymes, zinc is involved in the metabolism of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and energy. Our body contains about 2-3g of zinc. There are no specific storage sites known for zinc and so a regular supply in the diet is required. Zinc is found in all parts of our body, 60% is found in muscle, 30% in bone and about 5% in our skin.'

One indicator of zinc deficiency is fatigue and I know that it is an essential factor in immune support.

I was also reading in a BMJ note that low vitamin D can be associated with muscle weakness. It can lead to bone demineralisation. Again it is oil based - fish, namely the oily ones like salmon, mackerel and sardines, and cod liver oil capsules are a good source. Amazing isn't it that sailors would get rickets from a lack of vitamin D when they were surrounded by an ocean full of fish! But it is not surprising if all they had was ship's biscuits and grog and it didn't occur to them to catch any fish.

I also picked up links that low D can also be a possible link to high blood pressure but how true that is I haven't a clue. Of course, there is always a possibility that a deficiency can affect the blood pressure in either direction, simply because the body is not getting enough to make things work properly.

Interestingly though low D and zinc also seems to be linked to adrenal insufficiency and that can lead to low blood pressure so although your tests appear to be 'normal' it is always possible that there is a subclinical deficiency going on. The fact that your body is producing enough cortisol doesn't mean that the adrenals aren't struggling to keep the levels up. Vitamin C is a good adrenal support too and is needed for healing and repair.

It's interesting that your cheese craving is satiated by the flax oil - just perhaps the craving is actually for oil or oily food, not specifically cheese! Again, apparently a craving for salty and fatty food can be an indicator of adrenal insufficiency - sometimes the body actually does crave what it needs..........

Ali,

thanks for the detailed information! I didn't consider that low D and zinc are linked to adrenal insufficiency. Well, yes, from that point of view you're certainly right (and so is pele) that even balanced levels of cortisol and aldosterone don't necessarily say that the adrenals aren't struggling. Sometimes I'm too much stuck in conservative medicine which says that people with adrenal insufficiency don't have problems until very advanced stages of or even complete insufficiency.

I just wondered because it seemed to become even worse after starting zinc and vit. D supplementation, but if my intestine was still flooded with histamine this would certainly mean that the zinc and vit. D could not be resorbed.

As I said, sometimes I have one or two okay-days, so that I think, well, what are you fussing about, it's quite okay. And then suddenly the next day I'm worse than ever. First I thought that was because on good days I try to do all things I didn't manage before, so I knock myself out by working twelve hours like a complete idiot. But coming to think about that I suppose it was the combination of too much physical work and foods high in histamine. Physical "stress" inhibits the decomposition of histamine.

Now I'll see what happens the next days - I'll have lots of stress until sunday...

Concerning the cravings - did you know that sweet cravings can mean that your body needs tryptophan? I'm not at all sweet toothed, but sometimes I felt the strange urge to eat something sweet. Usually I crave salty things - which fits with adrenals. But people with fructose malabsorption often have disturbed resorption of zinc, folic acid and tryptophan, so that they don't produce enough serotonin which makes sweet cravings. I found that I can kill those cravings by eating non-sweet things containing lots of tryptophan such as sunflower seeds, sesame seeds, yoghurt, fish and meat. Cheddar, too, contains lots of tryptophan, by the way :P

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dtgirl: Since when do you have those problems? Did they occur all at once?

I always wondered - I had gastro-problems all my life and never was able to develop many muscles no matter how much I worked out. But still I was a great sprinter, could jog one hour or climb mountains the whole day without getting tired. I slept six hours and was fit for the rest of the time, could work endlessly. But then, all of a sudden, everything literally collapsed - from one day to the next I was weak and faint and exhausted all the time.

Last year I was totally fit in august, and in september - bang - collaps.

Did something like that happen to you, too?

Just wondering.

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Another jump in topic concerning the scd:

Having a close look at sugar and carb contents due to that fructose malabsorption, I found that tofu nearly contains no carbs and sugars at all. Nuts and almonds have much more sugar and starch than tofu. I can see the point with soy milk - all the carbs and saccharides from soy go into soy milk, but tofu is just protein. So I don't see why it is illegal on scd? Any ideas?

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I'm going to pop in here with a new topic. I just discovered that my container of sea salt contains dextrose. Aaghh!!! Why, oh why do they put sugar in salt??? Tomorrow I go to the store and try to find some sugar-free salt.

And, I called th Solaray people to find out if their sublingual B12 is gluten-free, an they said NO. It is made with sorbitol which can be made from wheat. Geesh.

Thanks Pele,

I've had problems with Solaray's B12 - knew about the sorbitol, but not that it can be made from wheat. Explains a lot ... will cut it out immediately!

And the salt too: just checked mine, a supposedly healthy brand, but it does contain an anticoagulation additive, E535. Does anyone know if this is SCD illegal (or just plain bad for you) ?

Jan

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Hi Jan,

that stuff is a kind of salt, sodium cyanide. It's said to be not toxic because the cyanide is tightly bound to the iron and the daily intake is very small because of the very small amounts which are used. But nonetheless it's a cyanide - talking about homeopathie and information, your body gets the information of cyanide...

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Hi Jan,

that stuff is a kind of salt, sodium cyanide. It's said to be not toxic because the cyanide is tightly bound to the iron and the daily intake is very small because of the very small amounts which are used. But nonetheless it's a cyanide - talking about homeopathie and information, your body gets the information of cyanide...

WOW - Thanks Mia,

I had no idea! I'll certainly stay away from that stuff and find some clean & pure salt ... What they put in food is mind boggling :angry:

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dtgirl: Since when do you have those problems? Did they occur all at once?

I always wondered - I had gastro-problems all my life and never was able to develop many muscles no matter how much I worked out. But still I was a great sprinter, could jog one hour or climb mountains the whole day without getting tired. I slept six hours and was fit for the rest of the time, could work endlessly. But then, all of a sudden, everything literally collapsed - from one day to the next I was weak and faint and exhausted all the time.

Last year I was totally fit in august, and in september - bang - collaps.

Did something like that happen to you, too?

Just wondering.

I've had these problems my ENTIRE life. They happen all at once.. I do not really have gas either, it is more like trapped gas, if that makes sense or "bubbles" in my stomach. When I was a baby, I could not drink apple juice, for example and as a kid I've never been able to eat things like raisins or fruit in general or veggies. I do not digest them or something. So no, I noticed these problems when I was like 4 or 5, that I had horrid constipation and bloating when eating these foods. I train for figure comps and do intense weight lifting.. I have always had a very difficult time building muscles. I can lose weight, but the muscle is not there! I've been really fatigued and weak in the past year or so.. my legs feel SO heavy. So yes, the same thing basically happened to me. I have gone from sprints and jogging to walking on the treadmill. I feel SO weak, especially compared to people much older than me. And when I do workout, it takes a lot out of me.

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Another jump in topic concerning the scd:

Having a close look at sugar and carb contents due to that fructose malabsorption, I found that tofu nearly contains no carbs and sugars at all. Nuts and almonds have much more sugar and starch than tofu. I can see the point with soy milk - all the carbs and saccharides from soy go into soy milk, but tofu is just protein. So I don't see why it is illegal on scd? Any ideas?

Soy is illegal on the SCD because Elaine researched and was concerned by all the bad things that soy can do to your body. Soy is actually not healthy for you at all and the American Heart Association removed their endorsement of soy as a heart healthy food (quietly so as not to upset the soy growers) after their own research proved how dangerous it can be. This is especially true for people with compromised intestinal tracts and children because soy affects absorption of minerals and affects hormones in the body. Here are some key points from only one article.

(I added the bolding)

Soybeans in fact contain a large number of dangerous substances.

This organic acid is present in the bran or hulls of all seeds and legumes, but none have the high level of phytates which soybeans do. Phytic acid blocks the body's uptake of essential minerals like magnesium, calcium, iron and especially zinc.

Soybeans also contain potent enzyme-inhibitors. These inhibitors block uptake of trypsin and other enzymes which the body needs for protein digestion. Normal cooking does not de-activate these harmful antinutrients, which can cause serious gastric distress, reduced protein digestion and can lead to chronic deficiencies in amino acid uptake.

Soy also contains goitrogens - substances that depress thyroid function.

In addition, soybeans also contain hemagglutinin, a clot-promoting substance which causes red blood cells to clump together.

In a study of hamsters completed under Schneider's direction, it was recently found that a component of soy beans - isoflavones - significantly accelerated the onset of puberty in the rodents.

Isoflavones, she says, can act like estrogen, a natural hormone important in the development of both male and female humans.

A baby fed soy will receive, through the phytoestrogens, the equivalent of approximately 5 birth control pills per day!

A very large percentage of soy - over 90% - is genetically modified and it also has one of the highest percentages contamination by pesticides of any of the foods we eat.

Is Soy Healthy?

The Dark Side of Soy

If you are going to consume soy, then your safest bet is to eat fermented products only like soy sauce and tempeh. The worst soy products are plain soy like soy milk, tofu, and soy alternatives. I was never a huge soy person other than soy sauce, but after finding out all this information about soy I began eliminating it from my diet, since it hides in many processed foods. There are, of course, health benefits to eating soy which is why it got it's name as a health food originally, but the bad completely outweighs the good. I hope this helps.

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Yes, thanks, darkhorse, that helps a lot. I knew about the pesticides and of course the genetical modifications but actually not about the dangerous substances. I can't eat soy anyway, but I wondered - now I have something to tell a friend who uses to eat his breakfast musli with soymilk and wonders why the heck he starts to feel uncomfortable with soymilk like with cows milk...

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I've had these problems my ENTIRE life. They happen all at once.. I do not really have gas either, it is more like trapped gas, if that makes sense or "bubbles" in my stomach. When I was a baby, I could not drink apple juice, for example and as a kid I've never been able to eat things like raisins or fruit in general or veggies. I do not digest them or something. So no, I noticed these problems when I was like 4 or 5, that I had horrid constipation and bloating when eating these foods. I train for figure comps and do intense weight lifting.. I have always had a very difficult time building muscles. I can lose weight, but the muscle is not there! I've been really fatigued and weak in the past year or so.. my legs feel SO heavy. So yes, the same thing basically happened to me. I have gone from sprints and jogging to walking on the treadmill. I feel SO weak, especially compared to people much older than me. And when I do workout, it takes a lot out of me.

Thanks. Well, I couldn't drink apple juice either, nor sweetened things in general. Vegetables mostly were okay, but sugar always made me sick. I suppose my guten intolerance was a consequence of the fructose malabsorption. It started when I was 8 years old - nausea all the time. The nausea went away with avoiding gluten two years ago, and I was so happy to be able to eat without nausea that I didn't realise I was bloated all the time until it got so bad that I had cramps in the intestines all the time.

Now today I worked in the garden for two hours, and as all the grasses are blossoming I stuffed myself with antihistaminics. I'm quite tired now, but my muscles are not as numb as they used to be last time I worked in the garden. Also my blood pressure seemed to be better today. Maybe this histamine thing really is worth considering. I'll report if this improvement keeps on the next days.

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More on salt, low blood pressure, etc.

I did look up salt in the BTVC knowledge base. Elaine said that the dextrose in salt is not a problem, it is legal. On the other hand, she said sorbitol is illegal. Go figure.

BTVC legal list also states: peanut butter with no additives, legal. Peanuts, in shell legal after six months. Shelled peanuts, illegal. Sometimes I wonder what that woman was thinking.

And on to low blood pressure. Mine was 84/50 today when the nurse checked it. I said That's why I'm here! They increased my dose of hydrocortisone. We'll see what happens.

I feel like the SCD has helped me tremendously with my digestion, but my endocrine system was badly damaged by years of gluten and hasn't healed.

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Maybe I can solve the dextrose and sorbitol mystery:

Dextrose is glucose, a monosaccharide. Even if it's made from wheat, it does not contain gluten - gluten is a protein, and glucose is the pure sugar. Sorbitol on the other hand is a sugar alcohol, the sugar alcohol of glucose. It is not metabolized through insuline like glucose but gets metabolized into fructose. As the body even of "normal" healthy people cannot metabolize more than about 60 g fructose per day, greater amounts of sorbitol dont't get metabloized in the small intestine and so go into the large intestine where they cause trouble - especially in already damaged guts, of course.

Shelled peanuts very often are treated with starches to keep them dry - so I suppose they're illegal bcause you don't know what starches they might contain.

By the way, I had a very reasonable doc who had the idea to prescribe me hydrocortisone just to see if my blood pressure will rise - just in case their would be some latent hypocortisolism. So I took the highest dosage of hydrocortisone for some time - but nothing happened except that the inflammation in my sacrum went away. But that's something, I now can sit without having pain! :rolleyes:

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Many of us here don't digest carbohydrates well which is why SCD helps. Here's another cause for such a problem: kryptopyrroluria. I'm getting tested for this in the next month. It could explain a LOT. It would be worth it for all of you to read the symptom list. Remember that you won't have all of the symptoms, just some. Of the long lists of symptoms, I have: poor dream recall, poor breakfast appetite, white spots on nails (in the past), allergy, weight gain, joint pain, cold feet, constipation, light/sound/odor intolerance, easy bruising, hypermobility of joints, bloating, light colored stool, stomach/gut problems, carbohydrate intolerance and faulty protein digestion, fatigue, functional liver problems, gluten sensitivity, low blood pressure, autoimmune disease.

http://www.hputest.nl/ewhat.htm

http://stanford.wellsphere.com/chronic-fat...-b6-zinc/603727

Dr Klinghardt, on his website has a downloadable notes from a recent presentation. He says 80% of his lyme patients have this, especially the ones who don't get well. (That's me).

The test is $55, so not too bad if you have to do it out of pocket.

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So I took the highest dosage of hydrocortisone for some time - but nothing happened except that the inflammation in my sacrum went away. But that's something, I now can sit without having pain! :rolleyes:
That's interesting. I also have a sore coccyx that makes sitting quite uncomfortable. Not sure that I really want to go down the hydrocortisone route with it though. When this Ultrasound appointment finally comes through, I think I might ask the Doc if it can be used to check that out rather than worry about the swollen liver, etc., which all seems to have dissipated anyway.

There seems to be a bit of a lump around it which one of the Doctors dismissed as a 'fatty' lump, but although that itself is not sore, the end of my coccyx is and has been for about three years or so. I can sit on hard surfaces, but anything softer that impacts on the coccyx and I end up having to shift from one cheek to the other!

I have kept hoping that the diet/liver cleanse/parasite/higher fat things might just deal with it but it is still persistently there. It does seem a little better some times than others but as yet I haven't figured out why.

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That's interesting. I also have a sore coccyx that makes sitting quite uncomfortable. Not sure that I really want to go down the hydrocortisone route with it though. When this Ultrasound appointment finally comes through, I think I might ask the Doc if it can be used to check that out rather than worry about the swollen liver, etc., which all seems to have dissipated anyway.

There seems to be a bit of a lump around it which one of the Doctors dismissed as a 'fatty' lump, but although that itself is not sore, the end of my coccyx is and has been for about three years or so. I can sit on hard surfaces, but anything softer that impacts on the coccyx and I end up having to shift from one cheek to the other!

I have kept hoping that the diet/liver cleanse/parasite/higher fat things might just deal with it but it is still persistently there. It does seem a little better some times than others but as yet I haven't figured out why.

That sounds quite familiar to me. It started with the coccyx and then spread over the whole sacrum - at least I couldn't sit longer than ten minutes without shifting, and that was painful, too, because the sitting bones also ached. The doc told me that was because I'm so skinny and sit on the bones. But then why was it so bad on hard AND soft surfaces? And now, after that hydrocortisone, it's nearly gone. Not completely, but so that I don't mind.

Usually you would not use hydrocortisone for this purpose but glucocorticoids.

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Skinny is not my problem...........I wish.........

I usually find when it is particularly inflamed that I have to keep shifting every five minutes or so - any longer and it get excruciating. It seems almost to 'lock' and I have to wriggle about a bit before attempting to stand or the pain is awful.

I think it may help to see if the Ultrasound can pick anything up although perhaps I would be better asking for an X-ray. At least it could be checked just to make sure there isn't anything wrong with the bone.

At the moment it isn't quite so sore, but I don't understand why it is worse sometimes than others. Someone suggested it might be a Pilonidal Cyst, but I have researched and am pretty sure it isn't that, but then I have also researched sore coccyx and haven't come up with anything on that either. The Medical Profession seems have no idea - as usual.

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No - don't wish to be skinny. It's not really desireable to have no reserves at all... It's not even useful for diagnosis - no fat between the organs makes it nearly impossible to get clear images!

The orthopedic surgeon told me that my coccyx is too much curved versus the inside. He also told me that he already has seen people with this problem who were not able to sit at all and had to have surgery to straighten the coccyx a bit. Not recommendable, though, because there is high danger that the tendons and muscles get injured. First I tried a non-steroidal antirheumatic, which helped, but only as long as I took it. Then, after some days of that hydrocortisone, it vanished completely. Now that I stopped taking the hydrcortisone it does hurt a little, but not much - if it doesn't get worse, it's okay. Maybe it's worth a try - four weeks glucocorticoid to kill the inflammation?

The Pylonidal cyst is very rare, and usually it is easily palpable. But if you say that the doc told you there was some kind of lipoma, they should make sure it really is some lipoma and not such a cyst.

Also I think that x-raying would make more sense than sonograhy. Sonography is for soft tissues such as muscles, but not suitable to image bone structures. If you wnat to check if maybe your coccyx is too much curved, this will be through x-raying.

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Thanks. Well, I couldn't drink apple juice either, nor sweetened things in general. Vegetables mostly were okay, but sugar always made me sick. I suppose my guten intolerance was a consequence of the fructose malabsorption. It started when I was 8 years old - nausea all the time. The nausea went away with avoiding gluten two years ago, and I was so happy to be able to eat without nausea that I didn't realise I was bloated all the time until it got so bad that I had cramps in the intestines all the time.

Now today I worked in the garden for two hours, and as all the grasses are blossoming I stuffed myself with antihistaminics. I'm quite tired now, but my muscles are not as numb as they used to be last time I worked in the garden. Also my blood pressure seemed to be better today. Maybe this histamine thing really is worth considering. I'll report if this improvement keeps on the next days.

So do you just avoid high histamine foods? I am looking into this. Also, do you (or anyone really) have any experience with hormones? According to my lab results, I am post-menopasual at 24.. I was at 21 actually. Amenorrhea for almost 8 years. My endo wants me on hrt, but I refuse. I know there are other ways. I am curious what other women do regarding their hormones.

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From a purely personal perspective, hormonal issues are not something that has ever really been a problem for me. I used to get the usual PMT where I was not much fun to be around for a few days each month, but apart from that I seem to have been sailing through the Menopause. It started pretty early with odd missed periods, about 10 years or so ago when I was in my early 40's but I have missed all the hot flushes et al.

I just have this feeling that somehow, although it may take some time, that if the diet is right, eventually hormones will settle down. I am sure they too are affected by the rotten 'Western' diet. Whilst they undoubtedly go up and down at certain times of the month, I have noticed that my daughter seems to be much more hormonal when she has given in to sugar and carb cravings.

It wouldn't surprise me if things like Candida don't affect hormones in some people too. As it can apparently give out any one of up to 70 different by-products including acetaldehyde there is every likelihood that it can affect hormones in some way or other. So getting that under control through diet has to help too.

Jane doesn't cope with stress very well and has been verging on bipolar at times - in the pit one minute and climbing the walls the next. She is taking St John's Wort currently (the anti-depressants made her pretty ill) and that is keeping her on a generally even keel. I so wish I could persuade her to get on the SCD.

I noticed recently that as well as helping with mild to medium depression, St JW is also anti-bacterial and anti-viral, and I do wonder if its benefits aren't as much to do with that as anything. If it helps to keep the Candida level down somewhat then perhaps it helps the depression and mood swings as a result. Who knows?

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Many of us here don't digest carbohydrates well which is why SCD helps. Here's another cause for such a problem: kryptopyrroluria. I'm getting tested for this in the next month. It could explain a LOT. It would be worth it for all of you to read the symptom list. Remember that you won't have all of the symptoms, just some. Of the long lists of symptoms, I have: poor dream recall, poor breakfast appetite, white spots on nails (in the past), allergy, weight gain, joint pain, cold feet, constipation, light/sound/odor intolerance, easy bruising, hypermobility of joints, bloating, light colored stool, stomach/gut problems, carbohydrate intolerance and faulty protein digestion, fatigue, functional liver problems, gluten sensitivity, low blood pressure, autoimmune disease.

http://www.hputest.nl/ewhat.htm

http://stanford.wellsphere.com/chronic-fat...-b6-zinc/603727

Dr Klinghardt, on his website has a downloadable notes from a recent presentation. He says 80% of his lyme patients have this, especially the ones who don't get well. (That's me).

The test is $55, so not too bad if you have to do it out of pocket.

Thanks for posting this Sherry. It's very interesting and i have many of the symptoms. I used to have white spots on nails also but haven't in a long time. I hope you get some answers from the test. I may have to look into it more and ask my Dr. about it since I'm taking so long to heal. I know I'm improving more and more on the SCD. That's not a bad price for the test.

Pele - it was very encouraging to read you saw much improvement after 9 mths on the diet. I'm right at 9 mths and i can tell i've improved a lot more over the last 2 mths.

My Dr. is trying to figure out my maintenance dosage of Vitamin D3 and for the last month she had increased it to 5,000 iu's per day and it went from 43 to 62. She has bumped it back down to 2,000 iu's per day and will test it again the 15th of this month. I have a feeling my maintenance level is higher than 2,000 because after about a day on the 2,000 iu's the joint pain in my elbows came back - i still had a little in my elbows on the 5,000 iu's if i picked up something heavy. She had given me an article on vitamin d3 helping with pain when she first tested my level and i know now by experience that it really does help with pain.

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More on salt, low blood pressure, etc.

I did look up salt in the BTVC knowledge base. Elaine said that the dextrose in salt is not a problem, it is legal. On the other hand, she said sorbitol is illegal. Go figure.

BTVC legal list also states: peanut butter with no additives, legal. Peanuts, in shell legal after six months. Shelled peanuts, illegal. Sometimes I wonder what that woman was thinking.

And on to low blood pressure. Mine was 84/50 today when the nurse checked it. I said That's why I'm here! They increased my dose of hydrocortisone. We'll see what happens.

I feel like the SCD has helped me tremendously with my digestion, but my endocrine system was badly damaged by years of gluten and hasn't healed.

I have low blood pressure also. I'll have to look and see what mine was last month at our Health Fair at work - i can't remember but have it written down. I feel my endocrine system has been badly damaged also by years of gluten.

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So do you just avoid high histamine foods? I am looking into this. Also, do you (or anyone really) have any experience with hormones? According to my lab results, I am post-menopasual at 24.. I was at 21 actually. Amenorrhea for almost 8 years. My endo wants me on hrt, but I refuse. I know there are other ways. I am curious what other women do regarding their hormones.

Hi dtgirl,

I'm with you on the hormonal problems. I'm 44 now but started with amenorrhea about 8 years ago too...at about age 36 or 37. Lucky me also had about all of the menopausal symptoms....hot flashes, night sweats, irritability, vaginal dryness, dry skin, etc. I'm on bio-identical hrt (vivelle dot and compounded prometrium cream). I think my gyno would like me to try going off of them since i have many fibroid cysts in my breasts and had to have a biopsy about a year and a half ago. I'd like to go off of them also but was kind of waiting to be on the SCD for about a year (which a year will be in Sept.) to see if healing my gut more will help me to go off of them. I was diagnosed with POF at age 39 which i think was caused by the gluten. Hrt did help me feel a lot better. I was given the bio-identical hrt at NIH and after 2 hrs of applying the patch i could feel a difference. We were driving home and i fell asleep in the car and when i woke up i felt so rested and hadn't slept that good in a long time. I had attended the POF study at NIH not long after being diagnosed and they found no known cause. I'm pretty sure they did the blood test for celiac there from what i can tell from my records but i had tested negative on my blood test in Jan. 08 from my GP and at NIH they didn't do the genetic test and my Dr. did and discovered i carry one DQ8 gene. I've tried to call them several times but have only left messages and can't seem to get a person to ask about it. I keep forgetting to call back but will try again.

I'm sorry you're having to deal with the hormonal imbalance also. Do you have many menopausal symptoms? The good thing is that you're very young and you'll have a much better chance of straightening out your horomones than i will since i'm 44.

The estradiol is supposed to help with bone loss also which i have osteopenia. I think i'm due a bone scan this year so it'll be interesting to see if it's improved. If so, i think going gluten free and starting the SCD will be a large part of it.

Ali - i agree with you, i'm hoping that improving my diet and healing my gut will help with the hormones and i won't have to take hrt. Time will tell.

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Very interesting, Sherry, about kryptopyrroluria. It makes me wonder which came first, gluten damage or deficiencies?

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So do you just avoid high histamine foods? I am looking into this. Also, do you (or anyone really) have any experience with hormones? According to my lab results, I am post-menopasual at 24.. I was at 21 actually. Amenorrhea for almost 8 years. My endo wants me on hrt, but I refuse. I know there are other ways. I am curious what other women do regarding their hormones.

Yes, I do. Currently I eat exactly the same every day - some plain rice and millet with steamed zucchini and mozzarella, steamed turkey with steamed chard, scd yoghurt with some blue- and cranberries and coconut oil, and two tablespoons flax seed oil per day. And every now and then if I feel I need some energy I take a tablespoon of coconut oil.

I didn't feel very well yesterday, but compared to other days on which I have so much work it was still better, I think. I was tired all day, but although my blood pressure was only 90 to 60 when I had a look at it, I didn't feel extremely dizzy like I did before. Usually I felt somewhat tired all the time plus had some extreme "crashes" when I nearly fainted. For the last three days I had no such crashes.

My hormons are not okay - no amenorrhea, which is about the only reason docs believe me that I'm not anorectic... But I don't have children although I didn't take contraceptives, and every time I have my period I feel terrible, night sweat, cramps until I sometimes vomit, and returning gastro problems in general. They wanted me to take progestagen, but I don't think that is a good idea. Like most others round here I think that the hormones will balance themselves if I find and keep the right diet.

At least I found that my PMS is better if I avoid histamine and take antihistaminics.

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