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Does Too Much Gluten In The Diet Cause Celiac Disease To Be Triggered In The First Place?

vital gluten unbleached flour celiac risk mayo clinic baking alcoholism alcohol smoking sun skin cancer

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8 replies to this topic

#1 glutenmaestro

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Posted 05 February 2014 - 04:31 PM

Is excessive consumption of gluten-containing food a risk factor for celiac?

 

I was wondering whether it worked on a similar principal to too much alcohol and alcoholism or sun exposure and skin cancer.

 

I never had any of the symptoms or signs of celiac that have been documented when I was in grade school.

 

A few years prior to being diagnosed I loved my bread and did a lot of home baking with organic unbleached flour and even added vital wheat gluten to breads and cakes. Neighbours always said that our baked items were the best they'd ever come across.

 

This video by Joseph Murray MD at Mayo Clinic seems to sum it up well.

 

Do you think there's a connection???  :unsure:


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#2 kareng

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Posted 05 February 2014 - 04:40 PM

Doesn't make sense for me. I never was a big bread/ baked goods eater. I would say I ate a lot less gluten than most people I know.
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#3 GottaSki

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Posted 05 February 2014 - 04:43 PM

No, eating gluten does not cause Celiac Disease.

 

Celiac disease can trigger at any point in a person's life....any amount of gluten once Celiac Disease is triggered is harmful.

 

If you had no symptoms until a point you were eating more gluten....you might consider this...perhaps the increase alerted you to the issue...thus preventing further complications :)


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-Lisa

Undiagnosed Celiac Disease ~ 43 years

3/26/09 gluten-free - dignosed celiac - blood 3/3/09, biopsy 3/26/09, double DQ2 / single DQ8 positive

10/25/13 - MCAD

Health history since celiac diagnosis became too long -- moved to the "about me" section of my profile

My children and I all have multiple copies of the genes for Celiac Disease, along with large variety of symptoms/resolution gluten-free

Current tally from me, three kids and two grands: 4 diagnosed with Celiac Disease, 2 NCGS

Get PROPERLY tested BEFORE REMOVING GLUTEN.

ALWAYS independently research health related information found on internet forums/blogs.

"LTES" a Gem :)


#4 Juliebove

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Posted 06 February 2014 - 12:07 AM

If it did cause it, I'd have it.  And I don't.  I eat toast for breakfast every morning.  Whole wheat.  But compared to most Americans I probably eat less gluten than they do.  Being diabetic, I do have to watch my carbs.


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#5 nvsmom

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Posted 10 February 2014 - 01:20 PM

I am almost sure I developed celiac disease in babyhood so excess gluten shouldn't be a trigger for me.


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#6 mopsiecat

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Posted 17 February 2014 - 10:31 AM

No, I don't think eating gluten has anything to do with it.  It sure does run in families though - I have numerous family members that are celiac.


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#7 glutenmaestro

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Posted 24 February 2014 - 09:33 PM

But they say to gradually introduce gluten between 4 and 6 months while breastfeeding. This prevents celiac disease. Introducing gluten too early increases the risk.

 

Another question:

 

Is there a memory component to this problem that forms over time, meaning that if the individual with celiac disease continues to consume gluten and is undiagnosed their reaction will be worse when they go off it and then are re-exposed by accident?


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#8 GottaSki

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Posted 24 February 2014 - 11:09 PM

A person that is neither celiac or gluten sensitive can stop and start eating gluten without issue.

 

If a person removes gluten for a period of time and then has adverse reaction when they resume eating gluten they either have an allergy, intolerance or Celiac Disease.

 

Forgive me, it seems you are struggling with accepting your diagnosis.  How long have you been diagnosed?   

 

1% of population has Celiac Disease.....the majority of which are never diagnosed.

 

6% of population have some level of gluten intolerance....which explains why many people feel better gluten-free.

 

We have all gone thru transition when diagnosed &/or found that our bodies can't tolerate gluten...let us know if we can help :)


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-Lisa

Undiagnosed Celiac Disease ~ 43 years

3/26/09 gluten-free - dignosed celiac - blood 3/3/09, biopsy 3/26/09, double DQ2 / single DQ8 positive

10/25/13 - MCAD

Health history since celiac diagnosis became too long -- moved to the "about me" section of my profile

My children and I all have multiple copies of the genes for Celiac Disease, along with large variety of symptoms/resolution gluten-free

Current tally from me, three kids and two grands: 4 diagnosed with Celiac Disease, 2 NCGS

Get PROPERLY tested BEFORE REMOVING GLUTEN.

ALWAYS independently research health related information found on internet forums/blogs.

"LTES" a Gem :)


#9 CaliSparrow

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Posted 25 February 2014 - 12:09 PM

But they say to gradually introduce gluten between 4 and 6 months while breastfeeding. This prevents celiac disease. Introducing gluten too early increases the risk.
 
Another question:
 
Is there a memory component to this problem that forms over time, meaning that if the individual with celiac disease continues to consume gluten and is undiagnosed their reaction will be worse when they go off it and then are re-exposed by accident?


I've not heard/read that but it's an interesting question. I had some symptoms when I was a salad-eating healthnut and even in childhood. When I became a gluten-raving maniac, my health really started circling the drain. I've been sick and not working for 10 years. I stopped eating gluten 11/2012. I'm extremely sensitive to it. The bad symptoms last about 10 days to two weeks and then there is more health fallout (catch whatever is going around and then get a UTI). The whole process lasts over a month. My doctor tells me the length of time my symptoms last will shorten as I heal. The first year gluten-free was a horrendously difficult roller-coaster ride. My CNS has been impacted which made it worse and there were times I thought I was going to die. There are odd things I can do now that I could never do - like pull an outfit together. My mom bought me clothes until she became sick and my husband did my shopping after that. Now I can SEE what my wardrobe needs. These types of changes have been the strangest part of this whole thing. Who knew? I guess everyone thought my elevator didn't make it to the top. It makes me sad to think of little me and any other little ones who fall just under the radar.

Anyway, I don't know the answer to your question but I was sick for a long time and I'm uber sensitive with long-running symptoms. It's still early and I'm not sure what will improve with time. So far, little-by-little, I'm being given a new life and some very unexpected changes with it.

Good luck on your journey.

Cali
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Last glutening: 12/28/13 (long time FOR ME!)
April 2014: no more reintroducing foods, not rocking the boat, no studying (except during insomnia)
March 2014: Reintroducing intolerant foods. Yolks & banana are a "no". Dairy NO
Year 2: Mental clarity improving. Hello to normalcy.
October 2013: Functional Medicine doc ref to cardiologist for possible sick sinus syndrome (deadline May)
September 2013: 55+ food intolerances, mercury poisoning, sIgA 50, leaky gut, adrenal fatigue, hormone disruption, ferritin 7, low Vit D, low Vit B6
January2013: Dairy-Free, Soy-free
November 2012: Gluten-Free
Year 1: Migraines resolved, OCD diminished, Change in skin texture, EyeBrows lifting & eyes bigger, Better memory, Better cognitive function, Better problem-solving capabilities, Lower anxiety level, Better outlook, Arrhythmia reduced, hope



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