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I will be traveling in 2 weeks for my first of 3 vacations this year.  Recently diagnosed (4/30/15)- wondering is there anything to take before, during or after if you think there will be or find out there was gluten in something you eat. There are several gluten free restaurants near the hotel but I don't want to ingest gluten by accident and my trip ruined.  Any ideas out there?

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Currently, there are no legitimate medications, supplements, enzymes, etc that can help a Celiac ingest gluten safely or reduce the effects of gluten.  There are some medications being developed but they are NOT available yet.  Anything you see that claims it helps "digest" gluten is ..... trying to think of a nice word here...... not succeeding.....  :ph34r:


 

 

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Currently, there are no legitimate medications, supplements, enzymes, etc that can help a Celiac ingest gluten safely or reduce the effects of gluten.  There are some medications being developed but they are NOT available yet.  Anything you see that claims it helps "digest" gluten is ..... trying to think of a nice word here...... not succeeding.....  :ph34r:

That is not what I wanted to hear of course, but thank you.  I have been reading about L Glutamine, do you know anything about it?

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If it is used to boost the immune system in Chemo patients - Why would you want to boost your immune response to gluten?

 

 

http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-878-glutamine.aspx?activeingredientid=878&activeingredientname=glutamine


 

 

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At first you should be sticking to whole foods (nothing processed) anyway. So if possible try to find a hotel with a kitchenette. Even if that is not possible, most rooms have microwaves and small fridges. You can get frozen gluten-free meals at a lot of grocery stores and just about all health food stores and cook them yourself. You can buy fruits and veggies which are naturally gluten-free, some eggs, rice, potatoes, etc. All of these can me microwaved. If you want meat, you could bring a small George Foreman grill and cook in your room. (Just be sure to hide it from the maid because some places might object.)

 

I know it's a bummer to be cooking all of your own meals when you're on vacation, but it's better than spending half your vacation being sick.


gluten-free since June, 2011

It took 3 !/2 years but my intolerances to corn, soy, and everything else (except gluten) are gone!

Life is good!

 

 

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If it is used to boost the immune system in Chemo patients - Why would you want to boost your immune response to gluten?

 

 

http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-878-glutamine.aspx?activeingredientid=878&activeingredientname=glutamine

Some people use glutamine for digestive system conditions such as stomach ulcers, ulcerative colitis, and Crohn’s disease. It is also used for depression, moodiness, irritability, anxiety, insomnia, and enhancing exercise performance.

So since I have 4 of the conditions listed above I thought it would be worth a shot.   Also, I got the name of this pill from another thread on this site so maybe it does do some good..... I am starting month 3 since my diagnosis so still looking for answers.

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At first you should be sticking to whole foods (nothing processed) anyway. So if possible try to find a hotel with a kitchenette. Even if that is not possible, most rooms have microwaves and small fridges. You can get frozen gluten-free meals at a lot of grocery stores and just about all health food stores and cook them yourself. You can buy fruits and veggies which are naturally gluten-free, some eggs, rice, potatoes, etc. All of these can me microwaved. If you want meat, you could bring a small George Foreman grill and cook in your room. (Just be sure to hide it from the maid because some places might object.)

 

I know it's a bummer to be cooking all of your own meals when you're on vacation, but it's better than spending half your vacation being sick.

The hotel does not come with a microwave or fridge and I am not happy about it.  There is a whole foods store about 1/2 mile from the hotel so that's a plus.  This is a work/vacation so we didn't have a choice on the hotel.  I have very few symptoms and don't really get sick, my celiac was found by accident BUT either way I do not want any more damage to my intestines.  I am still working on getting my entire kitchen organized and I am only eating and cooking gluten free meals. (I did make my grandsons grilled cheese sandwiches the other day without even thinking but I washed my hands right away)  I guess I will buy a cheap ice chest once we get there and get some fresh fruits and veggies...... This really is a pain.

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Call the hotel and ask for a fridge for medical reasons.  According to the ADA and some subsequent rulings - a hotel must provide you with a fridge and may not ask what the medical reason is.  I have only had one place charge me for the fridge - which is wrong.  If the hotel has a breakfast room with a microwave, you could use it.


 

 

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Call the hotel and ask for a fridge for medical reasons.  According to the ADA and some subsequent rulings - a hotel must provide you with a fridge and may not ask what the medical reason is.  I have only had one place charge me for the fridge - which is wrong.  If the hotel has a breakfast room with a microwave, you could use it.

I will definitely have my husband call the hotel.  It really is going to be a tough vacation.  I have another one at the end of August and then first of September so hopefully this one will be my test run.  There is a place called "Legal Sea Food" in Boston that I did some research on and it maybe "ok" but I just don't know.  It being a workcation I am hoping not too many "cocktail and snack" hours.

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A soft-sided cooler is helpful.  You can fill it with ice after shopping at Whole Foods.  That's what my husband does when traveling.  It is a pain, but worth the effort.  Feeling sick on a business trip is worst than being sick on vacation!  

 

When you read restaurant reviews, look for those posted by those with celiac disease.  Otherwise, higher end restaurants usually do a good job.  Always talk to the manager or the head chef.  Do not rely just on your waiter.  

 

If you grilled that cheese sandwich in a non-stick pan or cast iron, it is no longer safe!  Nor is that silicone flipper.  Cast iron pans can be re-seasoned, but you need to have a dedicated non-stick pan for gluten free things.  

 

Oh, I mentioned that anemia was my main symptom.  Two months after my diagnosis, I fractured a few vertebrae doing NOTHING!  So, damage can still be done without you being aware that it is happening!  


Non-functioning Gall bladder Removal Surgery 2005

Diagnosed via Blood Test and Endoscopy: March 2013

Hashimoto's Thyroiditis -- Stable 2014

Anemia -- Resolved

Fractures (vertebrae): June 2013

Osteopenia/osteoporosis -- June 2013

Allergies and Food Intolerances

Diabetes -- January 2014

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

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I travel a lot.  Get one of the gluten-free locator apps.  I have had a few bad experiences, but most of the time, if you use common sense and ask questions, it is fairly easy to find safe food.  The hardest places are most fast food restaurants, but they are mainly junk, anyway,

I have written off fast food restaurants... I have not been to one since April 30th and unless I can help it I won't go.  I have printed a list of the top 10 Boston Restaurants with Gluten-Free menu.  I have looked at all the menus and some maybe iffy but there are a few that only serve gluten free and vegan meals so I think that one will be the safest.  The Legal Sea Food is the most impressive though and also I believe the most expensive!

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A soft-sided cooler is helpful.  You can fill it with ice after shopping at Whole Foods.  That's what my husband does when traveling.  It is a pain, but worth the effort.  Feeling sick on a business trip is worst than being sick on vacation!  

 

When you read restaurant reviews, look for those posted by those with celiac disease.  Otherwise, higher end restaurants usually do a good job.  Always talk to the manager or the head chef.  Do not rely just on your waiter.  

 

If you grilled that cheese sandwich in a non-stick pan or cast iron, it is no longer safe!  Nor is that silicone flipper.  Cast iron pans can be re-seasoned, but you need to have a dedicated non-stick pan for gluten free things.  

 

Oh, I mentioned that anemia was my main symptom.  Two months after my diagnosis, I fractured a few vertebrae doing NOTHING!  So, damage can still be done without you being aware that it is happening!  

Thank you.  I was anemic for a long time but they couldn't find out what was causing it.  After my hysterectomy in 2013 I was still slightly anemic but that seems to have leveled out.  My nutritionist did not tell me that about the pans.....So I am back to square one and will need to buy a new skillet or two and put in a safe place.  I have spent so much money trying to get this under control!

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Thank you.  I was anemic for a long time but they couldn't find out what was causing it.  After my hysterectomy in 2013 I was still slightly anemic but that seems to have leveled out.  My nutritionist did not tell me that about the pans.....So I am back to square one and will need to buy a new skillet or two and put in a safe place.  I have spent so much money trying to get this under control!

softsided cooler? can that go through the airport?  I don't fly often but will be flying 2 times in the next couple months so any and all information is welcomed and appreciated.

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Thank you.  I was anemic for a long time but they couldn't find out what was causing it.  After my hysterectomy in 2013 I was still slightly anemic but that seems to have leveled out.  My nutritionist did not tell me that about the pans.....So I am back to square one and will need to buy a new skillet or two and put in a safe place.  I have spent so much money trying to get this under control!

 

I have written off fast food restaurants... I have not been to one since April 30th and unless I can help it I won't go.  I have printed a list of the top 10 Boston Restaurants with Gluten-Free menu.  I have looked at all the menus and some maybe iffy but there are a few that only serve gluten free and vegan meals so I think that one will be the safest.  The Legal Sea Food is the most impressive though and also I believe the most expensive!

 

A soft-sided cooler is helpful.  You can fill it with ice after shopping at Whole Foods.  That's what my husband does when traveling.  It is a pain, but worth the effort.  Feeling sick on a business trip is worst than being sick on vacation!  

 

When you read restaurant reviews, look for those posted by those with celiac disease.  Otherwise, higher end restaurants usually do a good job.  Always talk to the manager or the head chef.  Do not rely just on your waiter.  

 

If you grilled that cheese sandwich in a non-stick pan or cast iron, it is no longer safe!  Nor is that silicone flipper.  Cast iron pans can be re-seasoned, but you need to have a dedicated non-stick pan for gluten free things.  

 

Oh, I mentioned that anemia was my main symptom.  Two months after my diagnosis, I fractured a few vertebrae doing NOTHING!  So, damage can still be done without you being aware that it is happening!  

softsided cooler? can that go through the airport?  I don't fly often but will be flying 2 times in the next couple months so any and all information is welcomed and appreciated.

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Even if you don't want to fly with a cooler you can buy a cheap styrofoam cooler when you get where you're going. They're so cheap (under five bucks) you can leave it behind when you go home. And besides that, they really do keep your food colder than the expensive ones.


gluten-free since June, 2011

It took 3 !/2 years but my intolerances to corn, soy, and everything else (except gluten) are gone!

Life is good!

 

 

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That is not what I wanted to hear of course, but thank you.  I have been reading about L Glutamine, do you know anything about it?

L-glutamine is thought to help with healing muscle tissue and the muscosal linings of the gut. I used it when I was doing a lot of weight lifting, and it REALLY helped with reducing pain the next day.  I took it during the first year or two gluten-free, but I can't say if it helped since I have nothing to compare it to.  ;)


Nicole 

"Acceptance is the key to happiness."

ITP - 1993

Celiac - June, 2012

Hypothyroid - August, 2012

CANADIAN

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L-glutamine is thought to help with healing muscle tissue and the muscosal linings of the gut. I used it when I was doing a lot of weight lifting, and it REALLY helped with reducing pain the next day.  I took it during the first year or two gluten-free, but I can't say if it helped since I have nothing to compare it to.   ;)

 

 

Yeah  but it still won't keep her from making antibiodies, etc to gluten - which I think is what she was asking?  :unsure:


 

 

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Exactly!

 

It is thought L-glutamine MAY help with healing AFTER the damage has been done... It's like getting stitches after you've cut yourself badly. It's helpful to have the stiches, but it's best to avoid the whole situation if at all possible.   ;)


Nicole 

"Acceptance is the key to happiness."

ITP - 1993

Celiac - June, 2012

Hypothyroid - August, 2012

CANADIAN

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softsided cooler? can that go through the airport?  I don't fly often but will be flying 2 times in the next couple months so any and all information is welcomed and appreciated.

 

Yeah, we pack it in with our carry on stuff.  No ice or liquids though.  We add cool things once we get through security like (cheese, fruit, etc.)  Then we use it in the hotel, rental car, etc.  


Non-functioning Gall bladder Removal Surgery 2005

Diagnosed via Blood Test and Endoscopy: March 2013

Hashimoto's Thyroiditis -- Stable 2014

Anemia -- Resolved

Fractures (vertebrae): June 2013

Osteopenia/osteoporosis -- June 2013

Allergies and Food Intolerances

Diabetes -- January 2014

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

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Even if you don't want to fly with a cooler you can buy a cheap styrofoam cooler when you get where you're going. They're so cheap (under five bucks) you can leave it behind when you go home. And besides that, they really do keep your food colder than the expensive ones.

The styrofoam coolers are great too!  


Non-functioning Gall bladder Removal Surgery 2005

Diagnosed via Blood Test and Endoscopy: March 2013

Hashimoto's Thyroiditis -- Stable 2014

Anemia -- Resolved

Fractures (vertebrae): June 2013

Osteopenia/osteoporosis -- June 2013

Allergies and Food Intolerances

Diabetes -- January 2014

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

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I recently spent 2 weeks in remote areas of Montana and Wyoming and am quite sensitive to gluten.  If you can get access to a microwave in the hotel, that will help.  I had to rely on healthy snacking most of the time.  Here is my list: Beef jerky ordered online from the Healthy Jerky Company, veggies and chicken broth heated in microwave, gluten free bread and almond butter, gluten free cold cuts from Applegate Farms, almond milk and cereal, gluten-free Pure Bars, raw fruits, carrots, microwavable bacon, gluten-free corn tortillas with cheese and salsa.  Even in the most remote towns I was able to find restaurants where I could get a piece of plain grilled meat and steamed veggies.  I've had pretty good luck at Chipotle, PF Changs and Carl's Junior (lettuce wrap burger).  Sadly, my list is pretty boring but it minimized the amount of times I got sick from gluten.  I ate some deli turkey that I thought was gluten-free but I was wrong so I had to sleep that off for half a day.  Good luck.

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For what it's worth, both my son & I "washed out" of the Alvine phase III test of the new Celiac drug, what a pain it is to go through all that to be dropped because we are "TOO HEALTHY".

 

Guess what? If you go look in depth on the U.S. government website that covers drug testing & see what they are testing...and read the labels on the commercially available now supplements...it's the same!  Phase I & II did show promise and there's a reason it's into the end of Phase III. I just SHUDDER to think what the co$t of THAT Rx is gonna be!

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I live outside of Boston and you will not need to worry so much about finding safe food here.  This is an extremely Celiac savvy area of the country and many of the higher end restaurants can provide you with a safe meal. 

 

Legal Seafood has a stellar gluten-free menu, have good protocols in place for ensuring a safe meal, and, I believe, have a dedicated fryer.  They are not cheap but if you want a better chance of not being cc'd, then paying more for great food and knowledge ranks high on my list of things to seek out when traveling.  Legal's is an institution around here. 

 

If you want to name some of the restaurants that are on that list, I might be able to provide information on them.  But, otherwise, Boston is one of the better cities to find good, safe food for Celiac's.  I travel oversea's on a regular basis for vacations and eat out at night.  I have rarely become ill and I am one of the more sensitive, symptomatic Celiac's.  If you eat somewhere that offers up good quality whole foods, you can easily eat and not be sick.  You will learn as time goes by that traveling is not impossible on the gluten-free diet.

 

Let me know if you have any questions........I know Boston well!

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I live outside of Boston and you will not need to worry so much about finding safe food here.  This is an extremely Celiac savvy area of the country and many of the higher end restaurants can provide you with a safe meal. 

 

Legal Seafood has a stellar gluten-free menu, have good protocols in place for ensuring a safe meal, and, I believe, have a dedicated fryer.  They are not cheap but if you want a better chance of not being cc'd, then paying more for great food and knowledge ranks high on my list of things to seek out when traveling.  Legal's is an institution around here. 

 

If you want to name some of the restaurants that are on that list, I might be able to provide information on them.  But, otherwise, Boston is one of the better cities to find good, safe food for Celiac's.  I travel oversea's on a regular basis for vacations and eat out at night.  I have rarely become ill and I am one of the more sensitive, symptomatic Celiac's.  If you eat somewhere that offers up good quality whole foods, you can easily eat and not be sick.  You will learn as time goes by that traveling is not impossible on the gluten-free diet.

 

Let me know if you have any questions........I know Boston well!

In my research I told my husband last week that Legal Seafood had the best selection of gluten free entrees on the menu. I know it's not cheap but so far nothing I have purchased for this new way of life has been cheap.  I also found these as eating out options:  1) Not your average Joe's; 2) Cafe de Boston 3) Dante 4) Myers & Chang 5) Davio's 6) Elephant Walk 7) L'Espalier 8) Nebo Restaurant and Bar 9) Blue Ginger.... Any of those ring a bell?   There is a whole foods restaurant near our hotel and I plan on having fresh fruits and vegetables to snack on during the day since "my" dinner will be more expensive than usual.  What about the Beehive, Yankee Lobster Company, Harvard Square, Empire?  I found a bar that serves several gluten free beers but I can't remember the name and I don't think I wrote it down. I guess I will need to research that one again.  I am very excited to have also found a gluten free restaurant at the airport (we have a 2 1/2 hour layover)  Any and all suggestions/advice are so greatly appreciated!!!

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