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Victoria1234

Alarming info, please help discern the truth

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I was intrigued by the cellulose thread and googled it. Found this link http://www.csaceliacs.org/label_names.jsp

heres the part on the page I found scary. Pls let me know if it's a good site or cray cray, ok? It's about halfway down on the linked page if you want to see it in context. Thanks.

 

 

Ingredient Red Flags for Gluten-Free Commercial Products

Processing Information and Packaging Materials - How can these affect celiacs? Chewing gum sticks or candy might be dusted with oat flour to keep then from sticking to the paper wrappers. Taco shells and French fries might be dusted with gluten-containing flours to prevent them from sticking together. Coatings and wrappings designed to protect quality of meats, fruits, vegetables can be derived from a variety of vegetable products including wheat gluten. Gluten-containing products might leave residues in/on the machinery later used for otherwise gluten-free items. Extruding machines and conveyor belts might be dusted with gluten-containing flours to keep the product moving. Items might be added incidentally during processing. THIS GLUTEN IS HIDDEN, because it is NOT DISCLOSED ON THE PRODUCT LABEL; people with celiac disease have learned about these additions by trial and error. Not all negative body responses to foods are due to gluten. Check with manufacturer to verify the product in question is free from Content, Contact and Cross-contamination from wheat, barley, rye or at this time oats. For further information review the FDA Compliance Policy Guide, Compliance Policy Guidance for FDA Staff

Sec. 555.250 Statement of Policy for Labeling and Preventing Cross-contact of Common Food Allergens at www.fda.gov.

Starch - U.S. manufacturer's ingredient "starch" will be cornstarch only (not true for foreign manufactures or pharmaceuticals). "Modified food starch" may be made from wheat - also from corn, arrowroot, potato, tapioca or maize.

Gluten Peptides - Smaller pieces of protein from wheat, barley, rye, oats and other grains. These certain peptides produce intestinal damage in celiacs.

Hordeins of Oats and Barley - The test for hordeins in inadequate insofar as it is being used to determine safety of malt for celiac patients. In the malting process, enzymes are activated in the germinating grain and these enzymes begin to break down the hordein proteins into smaller pieces. Studies of enzymatic digestion of wheat proteins indicate that peptised with molecular weights of 10,000 to 10,000 are still causing intestinal damage for celiacs when ingested. In vitro (test tube) experiments indicate that peptides as small as 3,000 in molecular weight may be active. Accordingly, the absence of intact hordein proteins does not prove the absence of harmful hordein peptides. Differences in the malting process will give different results. Moreover, it is not possible to rule out the possibility of harmful peptides in malt by gel electrophoretic analysis for native hordein proteins. Because the questions of whether (or how much) hordein peptides are harmful to celiacs is unanswered. People with celiac disease have inadequate information to make an informed decision.

Natural Flavor - By definition may or  may not contain any of the gluten-containing grains or derivatives.

Malt - Malt is usually made from barley. May be made from corn.

Malto-Dextrose - Maltose and dextrins that may be obtained by enzymatic action of barley malt or acorn flour. Celiacs must avoid this product if the source is unknown.

Colorings and Dyes - Often the source is not on the label. Some people report allergic reactions.

Caramel Color - This additive results from controlled heat treatment of dextrose (corn sugar), invert sugar, lactose (milk sugar), malt syrup (usually from barley malt), molasses (from cane), starch hydrolysis (can include wheat) or sucrose (cane or beet).

Hydrolyzed Vegetable Protein, Hydrolyzed Plant Protein and Textured Vegetable Protein - HVP, HPP and TVP usually are made from wheat, corn or soy.

Monosodium Glutamate - Foreign sources of MSG usually contain gluten-containing grains, U.S. food producers may be importing this product. U.S.-source MSG usually utilizes a source substance of cane, beets or tapioca starch. A small percentage of producers may be using wheat gluten.

Emulsifiers - Emulsifiers alter the surface properties of other ingredients they contact; emulsifiers may contain gluten from grain.

Lectins/Lecithins - May be from the hull or graincoat of soy, amaranth, barley or other grains. A small percentage of celiacs appear to react to glutens only when lectins or lecithins are present.

Canola Oil - Versatile oil processed from a genetically modified variety of rapeseed. An Annual old world plant [Brassica napus] of the mustard family whose seeds are used for oil and leaves for fodder.

 

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The way the information is presented it looks like the definitions of starch etc are from the FDA Compliance Policy Guide, but they are not.  Here is the FDA guide:

https://www.fda.gov/ICECI/ComplianceManuals/CompliancePolicyGuidanceManual/ucm074552.htm

Without knowing the actual source of the definitions I can't evaluate their accuracy.

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Here is what the FDA says about use of allergenic ingredients as processing aids (from that Compliance Policy Guide).  They must be declared.

FDA’s regulations (21 CFR 101.100(a)(3)), provide that incidental additives, such as processing aids, which are present in a food at insignificant levels and that do not have a technical or functional effect in the finished food are exempt from ingredient declaration. Some manufacturers have asserted to FDA that some allergens that are used as processing aids qualify for this exemption. FDA, however, has never considered food allergens eligible for this exemption. Evidence indicates that some food allergens can cause serious reactions in sensitive individuals upon ingestion of very small amounts; therefore, the presence of an allergen must be declared in accordance with 21 CFR 101.4. The exemption under 21 CFR 101.100(a)(3) does not apply to allergenic ingredients.

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Another source for hidden gluten are the stickers adhered to fresh fruits and vegetables. The glue in the stickers may contain gluten. To avoid gluten exposure the best solution is to cut off the area where the sticker has been placed.

 

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5 hours ago, PTArt said:

Another source for hidden gluten are the stickers adhered to fresh fruits and vegetables. The glue in the stickers may contain gluten. To avoid gluten exposure the best solution is to cut off the area where the sticker has been placed.

 

No.  Not likely.  

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On 7/4/2017 at 6:50 AM, PTArt said:

Another source for hidden gluten are the stickers adhered to fresh fruits and vegetables. The glue in the stickers may contain gluten. To avoid gluten exposure the best solution is to cut off the area where the sticker has been placed.

 

Wow!  Is that old myth still alive?  Even if it were true, most people either peel or wash their fruits and veggies before consuming so there would be zero risk to a Celiac. 

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