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chrissy

Gluten Free Is Not That Hard!

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we eat peanuts and roasted nuts-----i'm a little confused about why you are only buying raw nuts, i assume you haven't been able to find any that haven't been dusted with flour---but i totally agree with you about unprocessed nuts being more expensive!!! i can't figure out how to say this---i keep typing and deleting-----but i think you really understood what i was saying when i said it is amazing how your perspective can change when it really needs to.(when you are forced into dietary changes)

it's the people that haven't learned to swim that are afraid of the water.

i just think it might be a little less overwhelming to the newly diagnosed if the docs and the written reports said things a little differently----more like,"the gluten free diet may seem overwhelming at first, but given a little time and practice, it will become much easier than you think."

when our ped gi first talked to me about celiac he said, "the good news is, it is totally controllable with diet."

that is alot more positive than," the diet is really difficult, but it will controll the disease."

christine

Christine,

I found out that roasted nuts are not gluten-free so I steer clear of those and eat only raw.

But yes, when you are forced to do something, you either deal with it or let it get you down. I refuse to let this get the best of me. It is just the cards that were dealt to me and life goes on. I would rather have to control my diet than have to take meds.


Laura

Started SCD 3/16/06

Diagnosed by Enterolab 2/06/06

IgA & tTg Positive, Malabsorption negative

HLA-DQB1, 0303 0302

Casein IgA positive

gluten-free 2/8/06

Celiac Blood Panel Normal 2/13/06

Rheumatoid Arthritis 7/05

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No casserole yet. I've been working too much for past month or so. Husband also is don't feeling well lately and he can't introduce new stuff while feeling sickish; so have to wait on this a little more.


Husband has Celiac Disease and

Husband misdiagnosed for 27 yrs -

The misdiagnosis was: IBS or colitis

Mis-diagnosed from 1977 to 2003 by various gastros including one of the largest,

most prestigious medical groups in northern NJ which constantly advertises themselves as

being the "best." This GI told him it was "all in his head."

Serious Depressive state ensued

Finally Diagnosed with celiac disease in 2003

Other food sensitivities: almost all fruits, vegetables, spices, eggs, nuts, yeast, fried foods, roughage, soy.

Needs to gain back at least 25 lbs. of the 40 lbs pounds he lost - lost a great amout of body fat and muscle

Developed neuropathy in 2005

Now has lymphadema 2006It is my opinion that his subsequent disorders could have been avoided had he been diagnosed sooner by any of the dozen or so doctors he saw between 1977 to 2003

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I have only been on this diet for about a week and it at first seemed much harder. Now that I am feeling better, I don't really miss eating things with gluten. Yesterday I ate something that was in a flour tortilla (on purpose to see how I felt) and I felt sooo bloated after. I didn't have any D, but the bloating was bad enough. I like cooking and make most of my food from scratch anyway. I'm going to ask my MIL to teach me some good Mexican recipes since most Mexican food doesn't have gluten in it. I am also going to learn how to make a lot of Thai food. The hard thing will be when my kids go on the diet. I want them to get a blood test first....but will try the diet if the test comes out negative. I know it will be hard since they love food that has gluten in it. And it will be hard to make sure DD doesn't eat anything at school that she shouldn't.

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Teankerbell-Can you elaborate on certain nuts not being gluten free? I was a little confused on that as I have ones in my house that are. Thanks!

Hey,

My step-daugher who is celiac disease and on this message board alot, found out that roasted nuts are not gluten free. She has tried, almonds and peanuts for sure. But after finding this out, she stays away from all roasted nuts and so do I.


Laura

Started SCD 3/16/06

Diagnosed by Enterolab 2/06/06

IgA & tTg Positive, Malabsorption negative

HLA-DQB1, 0303 0302

Casein IgA positive

gluten-free 2/8/06

Celiac Blood Panel Normal 2/13/06

Rheumatoid Arthritis 7/05

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Guest Viola

Actually, I think the problem lies with some 'dry' roasted nuts. You need to call the company and check on those.

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For me cooking/eating gluten-free at home has gotten so much easier. AFter just a couple of months it's already almost second nature for both me and my very supportive, non-celiac husband when we're in our own gluten-free kitchen. So in this respect the gluten-free diet is easy.

I haven't had too many pity parties. I'm so glad to know what was making me sick and that it is something that can be "fixed" without surgeries, and medicines, and it's not terminal (which is the way it was feeling when I lost 35 lbs in 8 wks).

Social situations, and any food consumption beyond my own kitchen is very difficult for a number of reasons. If I go to a restaurant then 1) I'm afraid of CC because more often than not I get sick regardless of where I eat or what I order. 2) I don't like that my diet has to be a focus at the beginning of every meal as I talk with waiters and/or managers and/or whatever food preparers in restaurant, etc. I'd really like to just browse the menu, place an order, and continue whatever conversation without the "to do." So many of our social situations in the work place and with friends & family are food-oriented. This is really, really hard for me. I'm not even beginning to feel comfortable in these situations. Yes, my friends and family are great. It's just.................well, this is where I have found that it gets really tiresome. Hence the contradiction to the final sentence of paragraph one. In this respect, the gluten-free diet is really hard.

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I actually like the way the gluten-free diet has changed my life in some respects. I never really cooked much before I was diagnosed. It was just so easy to get something on the way home or go out to eat. Plus if I did cook, it was always something quick and easy like manwich. Since I started gluten-free I really found a new passion for cooking. I like eating a variety of food and now the only way I can is to cook it myself. I never thought that I would cook some of the things I do now! I don't think gluten-free is hard at all once you get used to it (at least for day to day). Eating out and at other people homes is hard, but I'm always a little put off when people say "Oh I could never do that! I don't know how you do it!" It's really not that hard.

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Teankerbell-Can you elaborate on certain nuts not being gluten free? I was a little confused on that as I have ones in my house that are. Thanks!

I know that Fisher Roasted and Salted Almonds are gluten-free. I called the company just last week. They also sent me their gluten-free list. If you or anyone is interested, I will be happy to post it.


Patti

"Life is what happens while you're busy making other plans"

"When people show you who they are, believe them"--Maya Angelou

"Bloom where you are planted"--Bev

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