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GFreeMO

How Do You Do It?

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Do not be sorry. It is corn free--if the company says it is.

There are other mediums that xanthan gum is grown on ---soy, wheat, etc---and not everyone with a corn issue will react to it.

That is why when companies say "corn free" --they probably mean it.

Think they would risk a law suit if someone with a corn allergy ate their products with X-gum?

Nope.

Namaste Foods:

Our fine foods contain no wheat, gluten, corn, soy, potato, dairy, casein, tree nuts or peanuts and are:

Carefully made in a dedicated allergen-free facility

Made with NO genetically modified ingredients

Kosher certified

Thank you for clarifying that, you really do learn something new everyday.

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Mo,

My heart breaks for you! I hope you can find a few things you enjoy and don't react to soon! And boy have you gotten some great suggestions. I'm always amazed at how much there is to learn from others here, how awesome! ??

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Well I'm not avoiding gluten at this time so i'm not worried about cross contamination just yet. But how could someone actually live that way anyways?? So I can't eat a steak at a steakhouse because they serve gluten foods there?? Ridiculous. I better be negative for Celiacs cause this wont work for me.

You are starting with a very negative attitude. If it DOES turn out you have celiac you need to think positive. Of course it is hard at first. We all wnet through a period of mourning, but it CAN be done.

There are many restaurants that have true gluten-free menus. Dominoes just thought they could make a few extra bucks by claiming they had gluten-free pizza because they see gluten-free as a FAD.

You CAN go into a steakhouse and eat safely most likely. Steaks are usually cooked on the charbroiler and meat is the only thing cooked on those. You CAN'T just order a burger without the bun in some places because they might cook them on the flat grill that they also toast the buns on.

But you can talk to them and ask. If they can't do it, you can either order something naturally gluten-free like salad with no croutons, baked potato, or go someplace else.

Go to the newbie thread and read up on it. Check out the cooking section. Believe me, I am NOT coming down on you but I am worried that if you do have celiac you are going to quit before you get started.

Celiac can kill you of you continue to eat gluten. In nasty horrible ways, like cancer. PLEASE, start thinking positive. If the rest of us can do it, you can too.

And we are here to help. :)

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Well I'm not avoiding gluten at this time so i'm not worried about cross contamination just yet. But how could someone actually live that way anyways?? So I can't eat a steak at a steakhouse because they serve gluten foods there?? Ridiculous. I better be negative for Celiacs cause this wont work for me.

Hi, my name is Case and I'm a Celiac. I eat steaks at restaurants, drink beer with my friends, and eat pizza from time to time, glutenfree ofcourse.. Haha?I just want you to know that life isn't so bad on this side, I'm a regular young adult who lives a regular life, I've just adjusted to being gluten free. Yes, there's a learning curve but it's possible! Once you learn to work the diet into your life you'll be fine, don't give in yet!! ??

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Thank you for clarifying that, you really do learn something new everyday.

here is a rather "heady" discussion of X-gum :lol:

Xanthan can be grown on SYNTHETIC medium---which is why a company can say it is "corn, wheat, dairy or soy free".

My chemist hubs concurs

http://130.15.85.243/courses/CHEE342/outline/documents/xanthanreview.pdf

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See, you learn something every day. I did NOT know they could grow X-gum on anything other than corn. Although it seems that corn doesn't bother me anymore, I'd still like to avoid it whenever possible. I'll go back to the site and check prices. Maybe I'll try some. Thanks once again, IH, and Alex, I apologize for the bad info.

not bad info, honey!!...it IS grown on corn, but it also grown on other medium...synthetic included.

Pleas see my post above.

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In my opinion X gum tastes like crap no matter what it is grown on. :) I'll check out the mixes.

Thanks everyone!!!!!

Why is this stuff so damn expensive. Makes fruit seem so much more appealing. Maybe I should get on with things and start making smoothies and stuff like that.

I do really appreciate all of the help!

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In my opinion X gum tastes like crap no matter what it is grown on. :) I'll check out the mixes.

:lol:

I am trying to figure out how you can distinguish what x-gum tastes like in a mix? Or did you taste a plain old spoonful of it?? :lol:

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:lol:

I am trying to figure out how you can distinguish what x-gum tastes like in a mix? Or did you taste a plain old spoonful of it?? :lol:

LOL...tastes like soapy chemicals. Don't try it! :D :D

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First, HUGE virtual hug. So sorry it's dragging you down, hon. I know, it's freaking hard as heck. The whole sulfite thing I've run into ensures I've got to avoid all corn, too, even if SS celiac disease didn't do it - processed corn is all sulfited before processing. Kicks my butt completely.

Some things I've been trying to do to keep my spirits up about the diet.

1. When I eat, I'm trying to make SOMETHING I can enjoy part of the meal. I am trying to make a plate look all nice and fancy like, I dunno, the gluten free iron chef, LOL. Cut things pretty shapes (we even bought some tiny cookie cutters that are made for cutting fondant), mold things, layer them, set up a variety of colors with veggies and sauces. Good taste is the goal, but if I can't get that, I've been trying to make at least one thing GOOD about my meal. Like, set the table up all nice so it looks gorgeous. Play music I really like, or have textures I like on the table, like velvet or silk. Light candles with scents I enjoy. Or worse comes to worse, when I'm tired and exhausted and just can't take it, I put whatever it is on a plate, plunk myself in front of the tv, and zone out watching a movie so I can ignore my food.

2. Getting creative with veggie dishes. This site has been great for a lot of ideas for veggies that I was able to use: http://kitchen-parade-veggieventure.blogspot.com/

3. Grow an herb garden. Seriously - it helps. Any freaking herb you can grow, I highly recommend trying it. You can put piles of herbs on your food, in soups, make a variety of pestos, and it is so NICE to have that extra flavor. And it looks pretty, and it's just nice to absolutely KNOW that you have something that is completely safe.

4. I devote some time to finding ONE good food. Something that I really like the taste of and that makes me feel good. And if I'm having a really bad day, I may have that freaking food with every meal. I'm trying to work toward more than one or two foods that I really enjoy, but it can be all that works when I'm feeling really bummed about the foods I can't eat. It's hard to come to terms with what you have to eat if you don't enjoy any of it, you know?

Do you have a good list of corn free stuff? One that I liked a lot was at corn-freefoods. There's a good list of corn-free products recommended by the corn allergic, based on the company information plus how people in the community report reacting to it, or NOT reacting to it.

http://corn-freefoods.blogspot.com/2012/06/corn-free-list-june-2012.html

As a side note, they used to have Namaste with xanthan gum on the list, but a number of sensitive corn free folks reported reactions, so they took it off the list. This was almost 6 years back, however, and I do not know if they ever revisited this product after that. I should also mention that they don't claim that products they remove contain corn, they simply prefer to err on the side of caution.

Another great forum for this, IMO, is the Delphi forums. http://forums.delphiforums.com/avoidingcorn/start

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First, HUGE virtual hug. So sorry it's dragging you down, hon. I know, it's freaking hard as heck. The whole sulfite thing I've run into ensures I've got to avoid all corn, too, even if SS celiac disease didn't do it - processed corn is all sulfited before processing. Kicks my butt completely.

Some things I've been trying to do to keep my spirits up about the diet.

1. When I eat, I'm trying to make SOMETHING I can enjoy part of the meal. I am trying to make a plate look all nice and fancy like, I dunno, the gluten free iron chef, LOL. Cut things pretty shapes (we even bought some tiny cookie cutters that are made for cutting fondant), mold things, layer them, set up a variety of colors with veggies and sauces. Good taste is the goal, but if I can't get that, I've been trying to make at least one thing GOOD about my meal. Like, set the table up all nice so it looks gorgeous. Play music I really like, or have textures I like on the table, like velvet or silk. Light candles with scents I enjoy. Or worse comes to worse, when I'm tired and exhausted and just can't take it, I put whatever it is on a plate, plunk myself in front of the tv, and zone out watching a movie so I can ignore my food.

2. Getting creative with veggie dishes. This site has been great for a lot of ideas for veggies that I was able to use: http://kitchen-parade-veggieventure.blogspot.com/

3. Grow an herb garden. Seriously - it helps. Any freaking herb you can grow, I highly recommend trying it. You can put piles of herbs on your food, in soups, make a variety of pestos, and it is so NICE to have that extra flavor. And it looks pretty, and it's just nice to absolutely KNOW that you have something that is completely safe.

4. I devote some time to finding ONE good food. Something that I really like the taste of and that makes me feel good. And if I'm having a really bad day, I may have that freaking food with every meal. I'm trying to work toward more than one or two foods that I really enjoy, but it can be all that works when I'm feeling really bummed about the foods I can't eat. It's hard to come to terms with what you have to eat if you don't enjoy any of it, you know?

Do you have a good list of corn free stuff? One that I liked a lot was at corn-freefoods. There's a good list of corn-free products recommended by the corn allergic, based on the company information plus how people in the community report reacting to it, or NOT reacting to it.

http://corn-freefoods.blogspot.com/2012/06/corn-free-list-june-2012.html

As a side note, they used to have Namaste with xanthan gum on the list, but a number of sensitive corn free folks reported reactions, so they took it off the list. This was almost 6 years back, however, and I do not know if they ever revisited this product after that. I should also mention that they don't claim that products they remove contain corn, they simply prefer to err on the side of caution.

Another great forum for this, IMO, is the Delphi forums. http://forums.delphiforums.com/avoidingcorn/start

Shauna, thank you! I was hoping that you would chime in as I know that you eat this way too. The thing is, I never really ate packaged foods when I didn't have celiac, so why would I do it now? I guess it's because it's all there is. I always made my baked good from scratch with flour and eggs, etc. I never liked the mixes and I don't care for the gluten free - over priced ones either.

I am looking into making fresh fruit sorbets and things like that.

Thank you for all of your advice. I appreciate it!

I want to really thank you for the herb garden idea! I am headed to the nursery later to get some things. Wonderful idea!

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I've not been online for awhile and I wasn't patient enough to carefully read through the 3 pages already here. I hope I'm not repeating things too much. I feel for you too. I can't eat much processed at all.

I buy grain whole and sort it for unwanted grains before washing and grinding or cooking. I have found corn more than wheat as a contaminant. I have found quite a bit in Birkett Mills (Pocono and Wolff) buckwheat. If washing isn't enough to remove the corn so that you don't react, that buckwheat probably won't work for you.

What I have done to deal with this issue is get into gardening. I was already interested in gardening with a big ornamental garden so that is something that is enjoyable to me, and I have made friends with others with the same interest. Neighbors stop buy when I am out in garden and it is a nice social activity that doesn't involve food. They often ask for tours, and advice.

There are a lot of foods that you can grow that aren't easily available in stores, especially in a small town. They are actually considered delicacies and not weird food that only gluten free people eat. These are things like garlic scapes and pea shoots. You can grow all sorts of fresh spices and herbal teas. You can grow many more varieties from seed than you can buy in the store and it is all an adventure. Fresh from the garden food tastes really good and isn't at all expensive.

It is also nice to have hobbies which don't involve food. I am involved in a bunch of musical groups. Even if you don't play an instrument now, you could learn, or think of some other non food activity that you can do. Even with my musical groups, there are some food involved activities, but many aren't and I certainly have lots of occasion to socialize without food being involved. Exercise activities, fun runs, walking groups, or hiking might be an option.

It is very important for me to remember that the depression is likely the gluten talking. I get really depressed with trace glutening. Once I get over it, life seems so much better. You will be in my thoughts.

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I've not been online for awhile and I wasn't patient enough to carefully read through the 3 pages already here. I hope I'm not repeating things too much. I feel for you too. I can't eat much processed at all.

I buy grain whole and sort it for unwanted grains before washing and grinding or cooking. I have found corn more than wheat as a contaminant. I have found quite a bit in Birkett Mills (Pocono and Wolff) buckwheat. If washing isn't enough to remove the corn so that you don't react, that buckwheat probably won't work for you.

What I have done to deal with this issue is get into gardening. I was already interested in gardening with a big ornamental garden so that is something that is enjoyable to me, and I have made friends with others with the same interest. Neighbors stop buy when I am out in garden and it is a nice social activity that doesn't involve food. They often ask for tours, and advice.

There are a lot of foods that you can grow that aren't easily available in stores, especially in a small town. They are actually considered delicacies and not weird food that only gluten free people eat. These are things like garlic scapes and pea shoots. You can grow all sorts of fresh spices and herbal teas. You can grow many more varieties from seed than you can buy in the store and it is all an adventure. Fresh from the garden food tastes really good and isn't at all expensive.

It is also nice to have hobbies which don't involve food. I am involved in a bunch of musical groups. Even if you don't play an instrument now, you could learn, or think of some other non food activity that you can do. Even with my musical groups, there are some food involved activities, but many aren't and I certainly have lots of occasion to socialize without food being involved. Exercise activities, fun runs, walking groups, or hiking might be an option.

It is very important for me to remember that the depression is likely the gluten talking. I get really depressed with trace glutening. Once I get over it, life seems so much better. You will be in my thoughts.

Thanks so much for the response. I was looking forward to your reply as well.

It's too late for a garden where I live but I am headed to the nursery later this week to get some herbs that I can grow! This will make a huge difference in my cooking. We have some farmers markets near me that I am going to check out too.

You are so right about the gluten causing depression because today I feel so so much better about all of this.

I also love the idea of new activities that are not based on the food. There is a hiking group that meets in the state park near my house. Thats a great idea. I love birdwatching too so thats something else that I can do.

Thanks for your help! I appreciate it.

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It is very important for me to remember that the depression is likely the gluten talking. I get really depressed with trace glutening.

I can also say this happens to me.

That is exactly my "gluten tell". I follow the same pattern....I cannot sleep, I am "racy", pounding in my heart and in my head, I am "slow" and then, I feel pretty blue, somewhat anxious and I get quiet for a few days. (The gastro stuff is a "given". )

This is nothing like my personality :rolleyes: and so it is a GIANT clue I've been hit.

Plus, I BURN in my nerves, joints, bones and muscles.

I hate the neuro stuff more than anything else. :(

I think MO may be feeling a little isolated (as she has explained her circumstances) and maybe, she needs to spread her wings a bit. More activities and definitely find a celiac support group.

We all really do understand how it feels to be down, but we have to find ways to live that do not involve making food the center of every activity.

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I can also say this happens to me.

That is exactly my "gluten tell". I follow the same pattern....I cannot sleep, I am "racy", pounding in my heart and in my head, I am "slow" and then, I feel pretty blue, somewhat anxious and I get quiet for a few days. (The gastro stuff is a "given". )

This is nothing like my personality :rolleyes: and so it is a GIANT clue I've been hit.

Plus, I BURN in my nerves, joints, bones and muscles.

I hate the neuro stuff more than anything else. :(

I think MO may be feeling a little isolated (as she has explained her circumstances) and maybe, she needs to spread her wings a bit. More activities and definitely find a celiac support group.

We all really do understand how it feels to be down, but we have to find ways to live that do not involve making food the center of every activity.

It's mind boggling how gluten makes us all so so sick. Crazy! That sounds very painful! ugh. I wonder why it makes us anxious and depressed. I literally cry for a few days when I get zapped. The intestinal pain makes me cry but it's not that, it's like deep deep depression and it lifts after a day or 2. It's kind of scary.

I figured out why I am so isolated in my small town. I don't have really anything in common with other women my age. I am a book worm, I am always reading a good book, I LOVE birdwatching and feeding the birds. I also like hiking and the outdoors and gardening and going to parks for picnics. I am from Colorado but stuck in Missouri. I had so many friends and neighbors there. My closest friends have always been many years older than me. It seems like here in the midwest as opposed to Colorado and out west, food is the center of every single activity. In Colorado, it was such an after thought. Lunch would be some fruit and grilled chicken rolled up in a lettuce leaf that was eaten after a hike in the national parks. Here, it's pizza and crap after something that I have absolutely no interest in. Hopefully one day we will be able to move back to Colorado but for now, I am stuck. It seems that most women here that are my age are into shopping (I loathe shopping..I am a less is more girl) eating out, for some reason, they are obsessed with cupcakes and clothes and makeup. I don't wear make-up and I am not into clothes. ....Eh.....I could go on but you get the drift.

MO

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How about seeing if there's an Audubon group anywhere near you? They do bird watching activities all the time. Also, you could check the AHS --- American Hemerocallis Society (Daylilys! YAY!) & see if there are any groups near you.

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How about seeing if there's an Audubon group anywhere near you? They do bird watching activities all the time. Also, you could check the AHS --- American Hemerocallis Society (Daylilys! YAY!) & see if there are any groups near you.

I live in the sticks. There is corn in front and soybeans in back. Too bad i'm allergic to both...my luck...why cant potatoes grow there? I'll see what I can find. Thanks for the suggestions. :)

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You have to move to Ireland for the potatoes. laugh.giflaugh.giflaugh.gif

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I live in the sticks. There is corn in front and soybeans in back. Too bad i'm allergic to both...my luck...why cant potatoes grow there? I'll see what I can find. Thanks for the suggestions. :)

Come to Maine, we have taters everywhere you look!! ?

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I figured out why I am so isolated in my small town. I don't have really anything in common with other women my age. I am a book worm, I am always reading a good book, I LOVE birdwatching and feeding the birds. I also like hiking and the outdoors and gardening and going to parks for picnics. I am from Colorado but stuck in Missouri. I had so many friends and neighbors there.

I know what you mean. I am also displaced. I was too sick to work for many years so I followed my husband around for his job, distancing myself from my friends more and more each time. I am from Vancouver, Canada and live in Upstate N.Y. People are just so different. Their philosophy of life and what is important to them is different. Then add extreme gluten intolerance to that and ...

I think that working helps so that we can come into contact with more people. I did get a job again after so many years, but I only have three coworkers and very little in common with them. Do you work? The other activities help too and it sounds like you have some ideas there.

I bet that there is at least one other person in that small town who feels like s/he has nothing in common with the others who could also use a good friend. I hope you find him/her.

Thank goodness for the internet, eh?

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Maine or Idaho will get you your "taters" for sure. :)

MO, I love books, hate to shop, & love my birds (I am a bird counter for Cornell Labs--it's a fun way to help and they catalog birds from what observers record during certain months) and I am a photographer. Sadly, I could not have children and I could never really fit in with the "moms" I knew during my 20's-40's and that was painful for me. So, I get that part.

I love to cook and adapting all my recipes was a fun (and sometimes frustrating experience :rolleyes: ) but as my strength comes back, it is something that gives me great joy.

I love to write and I love gardening and the outdoors (although what happened to me because of celiac took away that ability to hike, distance swim etc.--- but I hope to get it back at some point) Hubs and I used to travel to NYC for shows, etc. and as soon as I am better, we will resume that.

Therefore, I can relate to much of what you are telling us. Many of my dearest friends & family are thousands of miles away, too. I did not grow here in NY either and most of my "peeps" are scattered over the country. I Skype with them often and I used to travel regularly to visit them (again, for 3 years that was not possible) but now that I am recovering, I am doing more of that.

So....Maybe you can go to Colorado to visit the people you are missing ? Traveling to Florida and seeing my best friend (back in March) really "perked me up"!

I felt isolated when I became very ill and yes, there is some difficulty with living remotely (we are waaaay out in the countryside--the closest neighbor is not that close at all) but I make a point to go into "the big city" :lol: often.

There is a gluten-free cafe and the owners & their kids have embraced hubs and me as family--and I have made dozens of new friends there.

Thus, my suggestion you find a celiac support group--even if you have to drive an hour or so --as I do --to get there? You have to "get out" of the house ---and "out of your own head". :) That is not a criticism. I am speaking from experience. You need some company, honey!

You are feeling down right now (and that is understandable) yet I hope you can find some things to do to stimulate and interest you. In the meantime, you do have us. :)

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It's mind boggling how gluten makes us all so so sick. Crazy! That sounds very painful! ugh. I wonder why it makes us anxious and depressed. I literally cry for a few days when I get zapped. The intestinal pain makes me cry but it's not that, it's like deep deep depression and it lifts after a day or 2. It's kind of scary.

I figured out why I am so isolated in my small town. I don't have really anything in common with other women my age. I am a book worm, I am always reading a good book, I LOVE birdwatching and feeding the birds. I also like hiking and the outdoors and gardening and going to parks for picnics. I am from Colorado but stuck in Missouri. I had so many friends and neighbors there. My closest friends have always been many years older than me. It seems like here in the midwest as opposed to Colorado and out west, food is the center of every single activity. In Colorado, it was such an after thought. Lunch would be some fruit and grilled chicken rolled up in a lettuce leaf that was eaten after a hike in the national parks. Here, it's pizza and crap after something that I have absolutely no interest in. Hopefully one day we will be able to move back to Colorado but for now, I am stuck. It seems that most women here that are my age are into shopping (I loathe shopping..I am a less is more girl) eating out, for some reason, they are obsessed with cupcakes and clothes and makeup. I don't wear make-up and I am not into clothes. ....Eh.....I could go on but you get the drift.

MO

And this is why Colorado is one the healthiest states in the good ole US of A! They aren't food obsessed....which doesn't mean they are not into food either. I loved Colorado, for the freedom it's citizens enjoy and the fact they are into fitness and are so damn friendly. I think it's because they are so healthy, they are so happy and nice. :D

I did a hike and brought a great salad to eat for after the hike. No one looked at me like I was weird for doing that, they all commented on how good the salad looked. That rarely happens in Massachusetts. They want to be super-sized...... :lol:

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And this is why Colorado is one the healthiest states in the good ole US of A! They aren't food obsessed....which doesn't mean they are not into food either. I loved Colorado, for the freedom it's citizens enjoy and the fact they are into fitness and are so damn friendly. I think it's because they are so healthy, they are so happy and nice. :D

I did a hike and brought a great salad to eat for after the hike. No one looked at me like I was weird for doing that, they all commented on how good the salad looked. That rarely happens in Massachusetts. They want to be super-sized...... :lol:

You wanna see super sized, come to Kansas and Missouri! I get what you mean though. It's odd how people from different parts of the country are into different things.

We are going to Colorado in late august. We rented a condo this time so the cooking and meals will be easier. I told my husband that I may be a squatter there and just stay in the condo forever. :P

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Maine or Idaho will get you your "taters" for sure. :)

MO, I love books, hate to shop, & love my birds (I am a bird counter for Cornell Labs--it's a fun way to help and they catalog birds from what observers record during certain months) and I am a photographer. Sadly, I could not have children and I could never really fit in with the "moms" I knew during my 20's-40's and that was painful for me. So, I get that part.

I love to cook and adapting all my recipes was a fun (and sometimes frustrating experience :rolleyes: ) but as my strength comes back, it is something that gives me great joy.

I love to write and I love gardening and the outdoors (although what happened to me because of celiac took away that ability to hike, distance swim etc.--- but I hope to get it back at some point) Hubs and I used to travel to NYC for shows, etc. and as soon as I am better, we will resume that.

Therefore, I can relate to much of what you are telling us. Many of my dearest friends & family are thousands of miles away, too. I did not grow here in NY either and most of my "peeps" are scattered over the country. I Skype with them often and I used to travel regularly to visit them (again, for 3 years that was not possible) but now that I am recovering, I am doing more of that.

So....Maybe you can go to Colorado to visit the people you are missing ? Traveling to Florida and seeing my best friend (back in March) really "perked me up"!

I felt isolated when I became very ill and yes, there is some difficulty with living remotely (we are waaaay out in the countryside--the closest neighbor is not that close at all) but I make a point to go into "the big city" :lol: often.

There is a gluten-free cafe and the owners & their kids have embraced hubs and me as family--and I have made dozens of new friends there.

Thus, my suggestion you find a celiac support group--even if you have to drive an hour or so --as I do --to get there? You have to "get out" of the house ---and "out of your own head". :) That is not a criticism. I am speaking from experience. You need some company, honey!

You are feeling down right now (and that is understandable) yet I hope you can find some things to do to stimulate and interest you. In the meantime, you do have us. :)

Irish, your story is very similar to mine. Celiac robbed me of having children too. We are both healing and getting better and stronger though!

Thanks for all of the suggestions and ideas. I appreciate it!

Big Hugs! - MO

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I know what you mean. I am also displaced. I was too sick to work for many years so I followed my husband around for his job, distancing myself from my friends more and more each time. I am from Vancouver, Canada and live in Upstate N.Y. People are just so different. Their philosophy of life and what is important to them is different. Then add extreme gluten intolerance to that and ...

I think that working helps so that we can come into contact with more people. I did get a job again after so many years, but I only have three coworkers and very little in common with them. Do you work? The other activities help too and it sounds like you have some ideas there.

I bet that there is at least one other person in that small town who feels like s/he has nothing in common with the others who could also use a good friend. I hope you find him/her.

Thank goodness for the internet, eh?

It seems that many of us here have so many things besides celiac in common. I wish we could all live in the same state. The celiac state. :P

I don't work outside of the home but my husband travels for his job and is gone a lot so I need to be here to hold down the fort. I use to be a teacher though and loved it.

Yes, I agree..thanks goodness for the internet. :)

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