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Which Is Better? Corn Or Rice Pasta?
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30 posts in this topic

I am 2 Wks. gluten free, but I am wondering which products are the best to buy. I am a big Pasta eater, so which is closest to regular pasta, corn or rice?

Your input would help me greatly. :)

Thanks,

Mark

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Some brands of rice pasta are good (I like Tinkyada), but I wasn't fond of the corn pasta I tried. Quinoa pasta is good too (it's a quinoa/corn blend).

Unfortunately, different people have their own preferences, and some people may prefer brand A, others prefer brand B. Not much choice but to experiment a bit. :-)

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I like corn pasta over the rice pasta. Mrs. Leepers's is good. Also

Orgran which is out of Australia, they have a good pasta. It is a mixture of rice AND corn (they call it RisOMais). It is good!!

For the rice pastas Tinkyada is the best. It just isn't good "re-heated".

-Jessica :rolleyes:

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I'm very satistfied with Tinkyada (rice) so I haven't even tried any corn pastas.

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I'm partial to brown rice pasta... I find it tastes the closest to regular pasta. None of them reheat so well, but at the first meal, no one in my house can tell the difference betw. brown rice pasta and the old wheat pasta.

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I like corn pasta and elbow macaroni. I think the secret is the sauce or what you put it in. I make my own spaghetti sauce using burger meat (in my case buffalo), contadina tomato products, onion, green pepper, spices and cook it slowly for a long time. I used corn elbows in goulash recently and it was very good...there too, using good quality products for the rest of the dish. I think the corn holds up much better than the rice especially when it comes to reheating leftovers. You have to be so careful when cooking rice pasta, you can get it too done and then it is gummy. I don't buy it at all anymore. I actually buy the generic corn pasta at the health food store and it is really reasonably priced.

Barbara

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I have to agree with Tiffany, I have found "Tinkyada" brand (rice pasta) to be my all time favorite thus far. I have found corn pasta's quite difficult to work with and in my opinion, fall apart easily after boiling.

-Sarah

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Tinkyada here too. It doesn't fall apart (some of the other brands do) and it tastes very "normal". A lot of people swear by Biaglut, but it's more expensive than the Tinkyada so I haven't even tried it yet for fear I might like it better! :-)

Bridget

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Tinkyada and RisOMais are both very good. The key is to not overcook! It tends to fall apart and get mushy.

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:D tinkyada here too--i loved noodles and really miss then--i have tried lots and lots of different varieties and tinkyada is the closest i have found--when i want noodles i get tinkyada linguine and use Better Than Bouillon chicken soup base and its as close as i will ever get to old fashion egg noodles----corn pasta tends to bother--i think i am very limited where corn is concerned--i can eat it as a veggie, but corn flours and pasta's seem to bother me--- ;) deb
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I guess I'm a wet blanket when it comes to gluten-free pasta but I honestly don't like any of them. The best thing I've come up with is a recipe for homemade, but it is time-consuming to make it so I rarely do.

Tinkyada gets my vote for prepared gluten-free pasta because it's easy to find and easy to cook, but I have a hard time calling it my "favorite" because I find it just barely more palatable than most of the others.

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In my opinion the rice pasta is better, because it has a very mild flavor compared to the corn pasta. When I make tuna salad with corn pasta, I have to add tons of stuff to overcome the corn flavor, so I am eating tons of mayo - which I would rather taste the tuna and the pasta all together. I buy all brands of rice pasta, so can't really tell you which one is best, I have tries the Tinkayada - however it is spelled - and it is very ggod. Just make sure you do not overcook the rice pasta, cause it will get mushy, I keep a very close eye on mine when I am cooking it. ;)

Bam

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Tinkyada gets my vote, hands down. I just like saying the name....it's fun! In my house, when my husband says what are you having I say, "Tinkyada", never macaroni or spaghetti. He knows now exactly what I mean..LOL

I learned about it from this board, thank you. I was never happy with the corn products, so gave up on pasta altogether until I found out about Tinkyada.

I've tried both their white and brown rice pastas and prefer the brown.

I DO use lots of water and add lots of salt to the cooking water, and follow the recommended time to the letter. Leftovers, if drained right away keep nicely in the refrigerator for a while.

Kandee

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Mrs. Leepers corn pasta and Ancient Harvest quinoa pasta. I am allergic to rice.

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Tinkyada brown rice pasta is the best in my opinion :)

I've tried pasta with corn in it and it wasn't very good <_<

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Thanks, everyone!

Looks like tinkyada is the overall favorite. I bought some Mrs. Leepers Rice Penne pasta at Wild Oats last week. It was OK but had a slightly strong taste. I tried the rice spaghetti too, not sure what brand it was. Wasn't crazy about it. I have some Quinoa spaghetti, but haven't tried it yet. I will try to find some Tinkyada, since most of you think it is the best. So far I agree with Catfish, that none I have tried to date have really been that great. I think I might try to make my own as soon as I find a recipe.

Thanks for your input.

Mark B)

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Don't forget that, after a number of months being gluten-free, you may find that you don't mind some of the pastas you don't currently like. Give them a try again after a while if you still can't find one you're satisfied with.

(Besides, pasta sauce over spaghetti squash is good too! ;-) )

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Besides, pasta sauce over spaghetti squash is good too!

YUM!

I agree!

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Don't forget that, after a number of months being gluten-free, you may find that you don't mind some of the pastas you don't currently like. Give them a try again after a while if you still can't find one you're satisfied with.

(Besides, pasta sauce over spaghetti squash is good too! ;-) )

Good point--this applies to all gluten-free food. The gluten-free bagels I didn't like at the start are now my favorite that I eat every morning (made by Sans Gluten).

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I wish Tinkyada would make ravoli, I miss that soooooo much. I actually made ravoli from scratch. I fould a mold at a restaurant supply store. I couldn't get my pasta to roll out in my pasta maker. I have the one that attatches to a kitchen aid. I rolled it by hand so it was too thick. The taste was okay. Since I haven't had ravoli in so long, I thought it was great. I'm going to try another recipe with sorghum flour. I found some sorgum flour from Twin Valley Mills that I really like. If I can get a good ravoli, I'll carry it in my store. I'm betting I'm not the only one who misses ravoli :)

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Yes--I miss it, too--particularly cheese ravioli. I had been having lasagna instead, which was just as good as my old gluten-filled lasagna (home-made with some flat noodles, made by Deboles I think). It's very good, but I haven't had it in many months since I cut out tomato sauce temporarily.

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thanks for the advice. I am still very new at this gluten-free thing, so I will continue to try different things to "acquire" a taste for them. Before I was diabetic I used to drink regular Pepsi, and now I can't stand the stuff after drinking Diet Pepsi for so long. Thanks for making that point.... Also, forgive my ignorance, but what is spaghetti squash???

Mark :huh:

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Spaghetti squash is a type of winter squash, usually available about half of the year (here in California, anyway). It has a VERY tough outside, but once you smack it hard enough to crack it open, and then steam it, the cooked flesh can be scooped out into the strands that it forms. It looks like spaghetti (hence the name), but it doesn't taste that way, so it's not a substitute, it's just something different to try. It's high in vitamins and nutrition, though, and a healthy alternative.

Here's a website about it: All About Spaghetti Squash

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I also have a ravioli mould and I make my own ravioli. My favorite is a mushroom/romano cheese recipe I made. It is hard to roll gluten-free pasta dough because it's very sticky and stretchy compared to normal pasta dough, but I found a recipe that works very well and a secret I've learned is to roll it with a Teflon coated rolling pin on a Silpat cookie sheet, and use Asian rice flour for dusting surfaces. It helps keep the dough from sticking to your work areas. Corn starch just melts into the dough so it doesn't work as well for dusting surfaces. Also, roll the dough as thin as you can get it. It will seem ridiculously thin, but will cook up just right.

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