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Dr. Oz Says Don't Go gluten-free If No Symptoms
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Has anyone heard of this? I always understood it would still mess up your intestines even if you have no symptoms.

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Dr Oz is not someone that I take as a credible source on anything. I have not investigated this latest claim.

Silent celiac disease is common. I wish silent Dr Oz was, too. :angry:

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I don't trust him either but he had a real doctor on with him talking about the subject. Something to look into more anyway.

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Did he mean "even if you have a positive celiac test, but no symptoms, don't go gluten free" or did he mean "if you've never been tested, have no symptoms that would lead you to believe you're gluten intolerant, and haven't seen a doctor, don't go gluten free"? Because those are two VERY different things.

The first would be, I would think, malpractice. The second is actually reasonable advice, imho.

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he also said that if you feel gluten is the issue to cut it and perhaps see your doctor. No mention of testing or anything.

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I do not watch Dr. Oz, but someone mentioned today's show was to be about "gluten free allergy" so I recorded it. I had seen a clip from another show he did on gluten-free was awful because the topic was how unhealthy the "popular gluten free diet" was - without discussing either Celiac Disease or Non-Celiac Gluten Intolerance.

"The right way to go gluten-free" was presented with a table full of whole foods and discussion that many of the gluten-free processed foods can have nutritional problems. Personally I liked that they showed whole foods as the best food for a gluten-free diet - rather than promoting all the recent gluten-free processed foods.

While today's show had a few problems, on the whole I thought it did have a clear theme that people need to be aware of symptoms that could be caused by gluten. At one point Dr. Oz stated that everyone needs to be aware of this because "those of us in the medical field" are behind on this issue - something very close to that anyway. :D The two demonstrations - one which was designed to show how gluten destroys the intestinal lining and another that the audience was asked to take a quiz of symptoms - if they had 4 of 9 they were asked to stand - this was to illustrate how many people could be gluten intolerant - not celiac. The expert being interviewed claimed as many as 1 in 10 could be gluten intolerant - their informal audience poll looked to be higher than that - definitely got the point across.

There was no discussion of gluten-free fad or the trendiness of gluten-free - so big plus there.

While the whole food display was good - there was a segment tying gluten-free cooking to popular internet blogs for healthful eating - a gal demonstrated some of her "no bake" recipes that happen to be gluten-free - they were not great choices as two of three were made of oats and she did not specify gluten-free oats at that.

Dr. Oz did say that he didn't think people that are not fall into the catagories of Celiac Disease or Gluten Intolerant should not eat gluten-free -- it was when he was discussing gluten-free processed foods, not during the whole food segment. I think he was pointing out unless there is a need you shouldn't replace processed foods with gluten-free versions - but this was one statement in a pretty good show regarding gluten intolerance. Certainly better than other tv segments and internet articles I've seen that are full of incorrect info.

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I don't trust him either but he had a real doctor on with him talking about the subject. Something to look into more anyway.

The "real" doctor who was on his show is just another one of these celebrity-type doctors who make their money selling "lose weight quick" diet books, and goes around telling everyone that the vegan diet is the cure for all ailments.

Well, maybe he's not that extreme, but you get the point. If I followed his advice I'd be eating nothing but microwaved oats!

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I taped it too because of the topic.

He really should have been more clear about the difference between celiac and gluten intolerance. Celiac - no gluten, no matter what. Gluten intolerance (according to him) - recognizable by symptoms & if you have them, no gluten.

IMHO, some folks can just reduce it - my hubby finds too much gluten to be an issue. However, think about it, people are inundated with gluten all day - cereal for breakie, sandwich for lunch, pasta at supper, bread, cookies, etc. Probably not good to have any one type of food base so much period!

Oz seemed to start off saying gluten was evil, and then back tracked a bit to saying that it only was if you had symptoms.

Not an Oz fan here - especially when his guest is pumping a book like that guy was on this show. Had to laugh when he referred to him as a world expert. *snort*

Must be hard to have to fill an hour full of stuff for a show day in day out.

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Agreed. Celiac Disease was not the focus of this show. I would have preferred a guest doctor that is an expert in Celiac Disease research and a real gluten-free cooking demo (using the items they had on the whole food display), rather than some popular blogger that brought some recipes that could be gluten-free.

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Dr. Oz holds a position at Columbia University Medical Center in NYC, which is also the home of the Celiac Disease Center, headed by Dr. Peter Green, one of the world's top authorities on Celiac. Dr. Green has appeared on other TV shows, such as the View, but not on Dr. Oz as far as I know. I question why Dr. Oz didn't get Dr. Green, or one of the other doctors at the Celiac Disease Center, to appear on his program.

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I didn't see the show, but I'm always happy when even "half of our story" gets out.

I don't expect your average viewer to be overly interested in intestinal biopsies, stool changes, etc etc

If the mainstream media includeds a story about Celiac and features questions about symptoms and "talk to your doctor", it's a win for all of us.

No one show, no matter who is talking about it, will ever get it completely right.

Even Elizabeth Hasselback's ridiculous book, full of bad information, was probably a plus....since some of my acquaintances first learned of Celiac from seeing her interviewed. Awareness, IMHO, is a big part of the problem.

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I agree it is good for gluten-free to be out there. However, when info given is only half the truth,I feel it harms us. I never watch DR Oz, but was flipping the channels one night and caught it. The Dr on the show said to be gluten free you only have to avoid, wheat, barely and rye. They never explained about gluten-free oats or malt!

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I find Dr Oz frustrating when it comes to celiac disease. His doctorate gives him credibility with the masses, but he just doesn't grasp the realities of our situation. :angry:

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Well Dr Oz tends to make shows that over-simplify (using props and animations) very basic first-year med student topics.

What he teaches is true, but it's very basic stuff that is made for baby-mind digestible audiences.

PS: I work in the film industry here in LA, met his crew once on a shoot, his props were actually quite elaborate.

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I find Dr Oz frustrating when it comes to celiac disease. His doctorate gives him credibility with the masses, but he just doesn't grasp the realities of our situation. :angry:

I agree completely.

OT That kitty in your avatar looks sooooooo comfy and relaxed. All he needs is a remote to go back and forth between the game and Animal Planet :D

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I used to watch Dr. Oz until I realized how everything in the world is good one day and then bad the next or how many diets this man has promoted. I am sure he is only talking about gluten intolerance just so he can benefit from this too.

Next thing I will hear is how Dr. Oz said to go gluten-free hahaha.

Every show is different and there is always a new problem and a new solution to fix that problem.

I wish he would just go away......

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