No popular authors found.
Ads by Google:

Categories

No categories found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter





Ads by Google:


Follow / Share


  FOLLOW US:
Twitter Facebook Google Plus Pinterest RSS Podcast Email  Get Email Alerts
SHARE:

Popular Articles

No popular articles found.
Celiac.com Sponsors:

Sequencing of Buckwheat Genome Hints at Gluten-free Noodle Revolution

Celiac.com 05/09/2016 - Exciting gluten-free news from Japan, where researchers say they have successfully sequenced the entire buckwheat genome. This is a big deal, because buckwheat flour offers certain advantages over numerous other gluten-free flours, especially in noodle making.

Photo: CC--Ishikawa KenThose familiar with buckwheat know that, despite its name, it contains no wheat or gluten, and is, in fact actually a kind of fruit. The sequencing of the buckwheat gene is exciting because it provides information necessary to develop new kinds of gluten-free noodles and other buckwheat-based foods that may be tastier and chewier than traditional gluten-free products.

Yasuo Yasui of Kyoto University and colleagues have sequenced the full buckwheat genome for the first time, identifying genes which could be modified for improved cultivation capabilities and taste appeal.

Buckwheat is a central ingredient in soba noodles -- a traditional Japanese favorite -- and is also used to make other noodles from China and Korea. In Italy, buckwheat is used in a dish called pizzoccheri, a type of short tagliatelle, a flat ribbon pasta, made with 80% buckwheat flour and 20% wheat flour. Elsewhere in Europe, buckwheat is used in French gallettes, and Slovenian struklji, While in other regions of the world it appears in pancakes and other foods.

Ads by Google:

In the study, published in DNA Research, the Japanese team found genes related to "mochi-ness", which refers to the soft, chewy texture of foods like marshmallows or fresh bagels. Until now, scientists had not succeed in getting the distinctive 'mochi' texture with buckwheat," says Yasui.

"Since we've found the genes that could give buckwheat this texture, I think we can hope to see foods, including soba noodles and doughy European foods, with radical new sensations appearing on the market in the near future,” Yasui adds.

Some people are allergic to buckwheat, and Yasui says that the sequencing information may help to make buckwheat safe for those individuals as well.

So, stay tuned to learn more about the future of buckwheat in crafting new, chewier noodles, and more.

Source:

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).












Related Articles



Comments




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:


Hi Readers, I see a couple people are following this thread, and maybe it will be useful to someone else in the future, so I thought I'd update. I sent a follow up email to the center with my questions, a request for clarification of some things relating to DH, and a request for the fu...

I haven't been in a couple of years for a tater, but, when I went before, I said " allergy" and not to unwrap the potato. They handed me packets of sour cream and butter. They might have ingredients printed on them? Maybe " light" sour cream is the only kind they have? The ones I have been ...

I went here https://www.wendys.com/en-us/gluten-info and seemed to have gotten conflicting info. In one place it's says the sour creme baked potato is gluten-free. In another place, under condiments, it lists only light sour creme as gluten-free. Anyone know for sure?

The only symptom I know of that is celiac for certain is dh, which must be diagnosed by a dermatologist.

I have both eoe and celiac and now that I have been gluten free for 18 months, my anemia is gone. It is good to get off the iron supliments because mine may have been the cause of my ulcers. It feels good to recover and heal! I may work my way down to fewer supliments and lots of feel great da...