Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):



Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):


Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Bibulousman

Most Important Meal Of The Day

Recommended Posts

Hi,

I'm wondering if anyone knows about breakfast cereals that are suitable for Celiacs.

Is oatmeal ok to eat? For example Quaker Oats has an instant oatmeal with flavoring that is rather tasty. Is this safe?

I've noticed that cereals like Corn Flakes have something in them that looks like it might be a wheat derivative (I don't read labels in English so it's hard to give an exact description). Does anyone know if Corn Flakes or Frosted Flakes are ok for celiacs?

Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter


Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):

Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):


Well, like the title of your post says, breakfast is the most important meal of the day. I know most people don't like to eat a large breakfast, but I do, and hot or cold cereals don't fit my idea of most healthy.

However, if you're looking for breakfast cereals, here are a few ideas:

Kasha (roasted buckwheat)

Amaranth (like cream of rice or hominy grits, high in protein & fiber)

Millet (a bit larger than amaranth)

T'eff (very very tiny, super high in protein & fiber)

Oats are almost always contaminated with wheat, so many on this board don't even try. Though research suggests a certain percentage of Celiacs can eat oats, again many do not chance it. I have no idea if corn flakes are gluten-free, but my guess would be no. I'm sure the company web site has an FAQ or something about that.


A spherical meteorite 10 km in diameter traveling at 20 km/s has the kinetic energy equal to the calories in 550,000,000,000,000,000 Twinkies.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

Oats are almost always contaminated with wheat, so many on this board don't even try. Though research suggests a certain percentage of Celiacs can eat oats, again many do not chance it. I have no idea if corn flakes are gluten-free, but my guess would be no. I'm sure the company web site has an FAQ or something about that.

I know Kellog's corn flakes are a no-no because they are sweetened with barley malt. I've had good luck with the Bob's Red Mill Gluten free oatmeal but maybe I'm one of the lucky ones.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

My breakie of choice is about a cup of brown rice mixed with an egg and a handful of dried cranberries & nuked. It has it all - complex carbs, protein, and a little fat. I steam 3 cups or so of rice & store it in the fridge so it's handy in the morning.

When I do eat cold cereal, I like Nature's Path Mesa Sunrise - I buy it in bulk at Safeway but the health foods stores often have them too (and some other gluten-free cereals). Mesa Sunrise is like cornflakes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

like many others, I rarely have cereal for breakfast - it's simply not a terribly well rounded 'food' for the most important meal of the day. (ironically, that's what I had today. ;) ) at closest, I may have quinoa flakes with flax meal and jam (for more protein, fat, and fiber than cereal would provide). otherwise, I'll often have rice cakes or an apple with peanut butter, eggs with rice (leftover from the night before) or a corn tortilla, or something like that.


Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"

Inconclusive Blood Tests, Positive Dietary Results, No Endoscopy

G.F. - September 2003; C.F. - July 2004

Hiker, Yoga Teacher, Engineer, Painter, Be-er of Me

Bellevue, WA

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

like many others, I rarely have cereal for breakfast - it's simply not a terribly well rounded 'food' for the most important meal of the day. (ironically, that's what I had today. ;) ) at closest, I may have quinoa flakes with flax meal and jam (for more protein, fat, and fiber than cereal would provide). otherwise, I'll often have rice cakes or an apple with peanut butter, eggs with rice (leftover from the night before) or a corn tortilla, or something like that.

I've seen a few posts which seem to suggest quinoa as a good source of fiber, but it has less than most gluten-free grains I've looked up. It does have carbs though. So I guess you're referring to the flax, right? Not to over-stress fiber, but t'eff can actually be a better source, since flax is normally eaten in relatively small amounts. For example, 2Tbsp flax has about 5.4g fiber, while the same amount of t'eff has 6g. So if you ate a bowl of t'eff, you could end up with too much fiber. Last I checked, t'eff is far cheaper than flax too.

Incidentally, t'eff has more protein than flax as well. With 6g for 2Tbsp t'eff, and 3.8g for flax.


A spherical meteorite 10 km in diameter traveling at 20 km/s has the kinetic energy equal to the calories in 550,000,000,000,000,000 Twinkies.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

Well, like the title of your post says, breakfast is the most important meal of the day. I know most people don't like to eat a large breakfast, but I do, and hot or cold cereals don't fit my idea of most healthy.

However, if you're looking for breakfast cereals, here are a few ideas:

Kasha (roasted buckwheat)

Amaranth (like cream of rice or hominy grits, high in protein & fiber)

Millet (a bit larger than amaranth)

T'eff (very very tiny, super high in protein & fiber)

Oats are almost always contaminated with wheat, so many on this board don't even try. Though research suggests a certain percentage of Celiacs can eat oats, again many do not chance it. I have no idea if corn flakes are gluten-free, but my guess would be no. I'm sure the company web site has an FAQ or something about that.

Don't count on any regular cereals sold in stores to be gluten free. They either have wheat, barley gluten or some kind of preservative in them. For some reason they love to use barley malt in cereal. Bob's Red Mill Whole Rolled Oats marked Gluten Free are the safest oats you can use. None of the other oats can be trusted. Problem with Bobs is it takes longer to cook them to the consistency you like, but they are probably much more nutrious than the instant oats. I add some cinnamon, cooked apples, brown sugar or maple syrup and they taste pretty good. Wild Oats Supermarket, Winding Way Farms and other health food stores have brown rice krispies, corn flakes and a few other cereals that are marked gluten free and fairly tasty. Some regular supermarkets are getting more in to gluten free, and they also have some of the gluten free cereals. My mantra these days is if it doesn't say Gluten Free on the package then you can't count on it being Gluten Free.


"The decisions we make dictate the life we live. To thine on self be true."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

To add into this breakfast thing since I to also believe it is a vital meal of the deal, I eat in the car or once at work everyday. This limits what I can take. I am new to being gluten free and have been making muffins. Not the healthiest choice but I am at a loss. A rice cake and peanut butter is just not enough and totally not appealing that early in the morning. I do like the envirokids cereals (again not healthy but yummy) and I will sometimes eat that at work but other suggestions would be great.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

Bob's Red Mill Mighty Tasty gluten-free Hot Cereal lives up to it's name and is made from brown rice, corn, sorghum, and buckwheat.

I've been using Gifts of Nature certified gluten-free rolled oats in baking.


Me: GLUTEN-FREE 7/06, multiple food allergies, T2 DIABETES DX 8/08, LADA-Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults, Who knew food allergies could trigger an autoimmune attack on the pancreas?! 1/11 Re-DX T1 DM, pos. DQ2 Celiac gene test 9/11

Son: ADHD '06,

neg. CELIAC PANEL 5/07

ALLERGY: "positive" blood and skin tests to wheat, which triggers his eczema '08

ENTEROLAB testing: elevated Fecal Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA Dec. '08

Gluten-free-Feb. '09

other food allergies

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

If you like oatmeal, try this recipe--protein, fiber and fruit:

Baked oatmeal

Cooking spray

1 c gluten-free oats

1/2 c dried fruit pieces--can use fresh, diced small

2 c skim milk

2 lg eggs (or 4 whites)

1/4 c sugar (I use sugar free syrup)

1/2 tsp vanilla

1/8 tsp salt

Preheat oven to 350

Lightly spray 2 oven safe cereal sized bowls, set aside

Stir together oats and fruit, divide among the bowls

Place cups in a shallow baking dish (for ease of moving)

In a bowl, whisk milk, eggs, sugar, vanilla and salt until sugar is dissolved

Pour evenly over the oats

Bake 30-40 minutes, until centers are set, serve warm drizzle with syrup

350 calories per bowl


Rachelle 20dance.gif

Daughter diagnosed 1/06 bloodwork and biopsy
-gluten-free since 1/06

Son tested negative-bloodwork (8/07), intestinal issues prompted biospy (3/08), results negative, but very positive dietary response, Dr. diagnosed Celiac disease (3/8)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

Only Oats (www.onlyoats.ca) and Lara's Oats (www.Lame Advertisement.com) produce pure uncomtaminated oats. Only Oats even has Quick Oat Flakes. You can order it from their website. Also Lara's oats products are avialble in many health stores.


Better safe than glutened

Dairy Free / Gluten Free / Soy Free / Corn Free / Mostly Nut Free / Legumes Free

Low histamine / amine / glutamate diet

Restricted animal protein diet

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

Don't count on any regular cereals sold in stores to be gluten free. They either have wheat, barley gluten or some kind of preservative in them. For some reason they love to use barley malt in cereal. Bob's Red Mill Whole Rolled Oats marked Gluten Free are the safest oats you can use. None of the other oats can be trusted. Problem with Bobs is it takes longer to cook them to the consistency you like, but they are probably much more nutrious than the instant oats. I add some cinnamon, cooked apples, brown sugar or maple syrup and they taste pretty good. Wild Oats Supermarket, Winding Way Farms and other health food stores have brown rice krispies, corn flakes and a few other cereals that are marked gluten free and fairly tasty. Some regular supermarkets are getting more in to gluten free, and they also have some of the gluten free cereals. My mantra these days is if it doesn't say Gluten Free on the package then you can't count on it being Gluten Free.

While this is mostly correct, Fruity Pebbles, Winnie the Pooh Cruch, Dora Stars are safe.


~~~~Gluten Free since 9/2004~~~~~~

Friends may come and go but Sillies are Forever!!!!!!!

36_22_10[1].gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

Forget cereal. Eat leftovers, lunch and dinner foods, eggs, etc - you'll stay fuller longer. You can scramble together a box of thawed chopped spinach, a handful of grated cheese, 6 eggs, and some cooked sausage chopped into bites until it's all cooked on Sunday, put it in the fridge, and scoop it out and warm up a bowl of it for the next 4 days. Van's gluten-free waffles with cream cheese or peanut butter. Bowl of plain yogurt (try Greek strained yogurt but not the non-fat kind) with nuts and fruit of your choice. gluten-free corn tortilla microwaved with a slice of cheese and a slice of ham, then rolled up. These don't take much longer than cereal and will keep you full and probably cost you less. I keep cereal (Rice Crunchem's and Mesa Sunrise) around for those few times I don't have anything else to eat. And I used to eat 3 bowls of Cheerios every morning and then be starving by 10:30. Now I eat this stuff and I'm not hungry before noon.


Lee

I never liked bread anyway.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

I've seen a few posts which seem to suggest quinoa as a good source of fiber, but it has less than most gluten-free grains I've looked up. It does have carbs though. So I guess you're referring to the flax, right? Not to over-stress fiber, but t'eff can actually be a better source, since flax is normally eaten in relatively small amounts. For example, 2Tbsp flax has about 5.4g fiber, while the same amount of t'eff has 6g. So if you ate a bowl of t'eff, you could end up with too much fiber. Last I checked, t'eff is far cheaper than flax too.

Incidentally, t'eff has more protein than flax as well. With 6g for 2Tbsp t'eff, and 3.8g for flax.

while it doesn't have as much fiber, it can be cooked with just hot water at work, which is a big bonus for me. ;)


Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"

Inconclusive Blood Tests, Positive Dietary Results, No Endoscopy

G.F. - September 2003; C.F. - July 2004

Hiker, Yoga Teacher, Engineer, Painter, Be-er of Me

Bellevue, WA

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

http://www.Lame Advertisement.com/ProductsList.aspx?c=1&cid=135

I keep the above around for a quick breakfast, something healthy on the go or something healthy to have around that is quick and healthy so I won't be tempted to grab something bad when hunger hits fast as there still is some junk food in the house for the others.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter



Join eNewsletter