Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):


Join eNewsletter


Celiac.com Sponsor (A1-m):



Join eNewsletter

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

snowcoveredheart

New Girl - Trying To Work Out The Ropes!

Recommended Posts

hi all,

brand new to the forums so please be gentle.

I was diagnosed with celiac disease some 7 years ago... at the same time i was told i was lactose intollerent (it also attack the system) - however due to many other issues least of all the fact i was going through mental health diagnosis (im Bi polar) i couldnt have cared less... needless to say that i ignored it all.

I am now fully diagnosed and have been coping with my BP for about a year (and am finally gaining some success with it - not on meds, i cannot afford the side effects and do what i do at work).. as such i have turned my attentions back to the gluten-free and DF diets... after all there is much evidence that what we eat affects the mood and mental health.

I have read all the gumf i was given and everythign else i can get my hands on and am going for a total absinence from all sorts of stuff ive had a reaction to ( i also had a reaction to peanuts and soya and dairy on the tests) and then try and put some of it back in if i can.

my main concern is how this will affect my weekends as so much of what we all do socially is focused around food! but seeing so many peeps living well with it does give me blessings all

S

xXx

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):

Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):


Hi S: Welcome to the Board!

We never eat out anymore due to my husband's Celiac; but we've learned that the sacrfice is worth it as most of his symptoms have gone away, but the permanent damage is still there.

Whether to eat out or not is entirely up to you and your level of confidence with the restaurant AND server.

Just a suggestion: I would recommend going to celiac disease support group meetings and try to cultivate some friendships from others who share your health concerns. We don't have a support group around us and I can tell you that had we, it would have been easier for us.


Husband has Celiac Disease and

Husband misdiagnosed for 27 yrs -

The misdiagnosis was: IBS or colitis

Mis-diagnosed from 1977 to 2003 by various gastros including one of the largest,

most prestigious medical groups in northern NJ which constantly advertises themselves as

being the "best." This GI told him it was "all in his head."

Serious Depressive state ensued

Finally Diagnosed with celiac disease in 2003

Other food sensitivities: almost all fruits, vegetables, spices, eggs, nuts, yeast, fried foods, roughage, soy.

Needs to gain back at least 25 lbs. of the 40 lbs pounds he lost - lost a great amout of body fat and muscle

Developed neuropathy in 2005

Now has lymphadema 2006It is my opinion that his subsequent disorders could have been avoided had he been diagnosed sooner by any of the dozen or so doctors he saw between 1977 to 2003

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi S! Welcome!

I hope that you feel welcome here--the vast majority of the people here are knowledgeable and supportive and happy to share their experiences and information. It's really a great group. I am new to this and I can honestly tell you that had it not been for this site, I don't know what I would have done! I received NO information from my doctor's office, so everything I have learned I have gotten from these people and doing research online.

I am very wary now of eating out. I haven't been out since I was dx'd and probably won't eat out until the end the month when we have company here. I have been gathering a list of restaurants that provide gluten free menus, and I know that I can pretty much always get a salad with oil and vinegar if nothing else. I am also intolerant to casein, so that complicates things just a bit. I also know people who take their own food when they go out just to be able to socialize with their friends. I have definitely been known to bring my own salad dressing. I guess it's all what you are comfortable with. I also know a lot of people who do a lot of entertaining in their home, that way they can control the food that is prepared and eaten.

So, come often, lurk, post, share, complain, ask questions--this is a great place to get info and support!

Good luck with your bp--I have a relative who is also bp and would love for him to get off his meds as well. Keep me posted on how it's going!

CL


Dx'd with lymphocytic colitis 1/07

Dx'd by Enterolab 3/07--+IgA, +Ttg, DQ2 and DQ8

Dx'd celiac by Dr. Lewey 4/07--without +blood or biopsy

gluten-free 3/7/07

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
hi all,

brand new to the forums so please be gentle.

I was diagnosed with celiac disease some 7 years ago... at the same time i was told i was lactose intollerent (it also attack the system) - however due to many other issues least of all the fact i was going through mental health diagnosis (im Bi polar) i couldnt have cared less... needless to say that i ignored it all.

I am now fully diagnosed and have been coping with my BP for about a year (and am finally gaining some success with it - not on meds, i cannot afford the side effects and do what i do at work).. as such i have turned my attentions back to the gluten-free and DF diets... after all there is much evidence that what we eat affects the mood and mental health.

I have read all the gumf i was given and everythign else i can get my hands on and am going for a total absinence from all sorts of stuff ive had a reaction to ( i also had a reaction to peanuts and soya and dairy on the tests) and then try and put some of it back in if i can.

my main concern is how this will affect my weekends as so much of what we all do socially is focused around food! but seeing so many peeps living well with it does give me blessings all

S

xXx

Dear snowcoveredheart,

Have you been on a lot of antibiotics, birth control, or steroids for asthma or other things? The reason I am asking is because I have done a lot of research on a systemic overgrowth of Candida yeast. In my research, it has been implicated as a cause of Bipolar Disorder. It has links to other diseases such as schizophrenia, autism, ADD, ADHD, and Alzheimer's. Yeast can cause so many physical and mental problems, it is unbelievable.

Sincerely,

NoGluGirl


Jin

Strawberry Allergy, mold allergy, dustmites allergy, ragweed allergy, dust allergy, food dye allergy - 1985

Asthma - 1994

Ovarian Cyst - May 1999

Anemia - 2000

4 More Ovarian Cysts - March 2000

Bloodwork for Celiac - November 2000 negative

Colonoscopy, Endoscopy, Intercolisis, Gastric Emptying Study - May and June 2001 negative biopsy

Fibromyalgia - June 2001

IBS - June 2001

Gallbladder Removal - July 28, 2003 after doctor said the tests showed nothing, so it was not gallbladder disease. It was very inflamed and irritated and nearly ruptured the surgeon told me at my 10 day post-op check-up.

Thyroid Disease - August 2004

Celiac Disease - March 2007 Current Dr. refers to me as Celiac, as she says blood tests are often inaccurate.

Official Purple Glittery Bat Keeper, District Attorney, and Chinese Restaurant Owner of The Silver Dragon of Rachelville

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dear snowcoveredheart,

Have you been on a lot of antibiotics, birth control, or steroids for asthma or other things? The reason I am asking is because I have done a lot of research on a systemic overgrowth of Candida yeast. In my research, it has been implicated as a cause of Bipolar Disorder. It has links to other diseases such as schizophrenia, autism, ADD, ADHD, and Alzheimer's. Yeast can cause so many physical and mental problems, it is unbelievable.

Sincerely,

NoGluGirl

Hi NoGluGirl

There are some wonderfully informative governmental reports out there now regarding what we eat and the effects it has. I have obviously done a hell of a lot or research myself over the years (it took seven years to get my final diagnosis and the issues had arrisen long before that point). Equally there are far more interesting reports as to the causes of bi polar, most of which agree there is no single answer and a lot of darkness and guess work.

As to your question, no i have not. I have been on birth controll for nearly ten years now (on and off) however, due to hormonal issues im on a much lower level dose than is standard and ive never taken steriods or had asthesma.

I am interested to see how the new diet aids, I have been warened than initally i will be in for a rocky patch whilst my body gets used to the changes (as would everyone) but of course given the gravity and biological nature of those changes and adjustments there is much to look out for as they affect other aspects. Hopefully, when i get to the other side of that it should be worth it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your weekends will be so much better if you're not sick all the time! When everyone's eating at a friend's place, I bring my own food. I also have one friend who is amazing about my diet so he cooks for me (he's the only one I'll trust to cook me food). If we're going out to eat, sometimes I still bring my own food. If I'm going, my friends will make sure it's a gluten-free-friendly place - I have a ton of influence on where we eat. Sometimes I meet up with everyone after dinner. I also do a lot of activities where you can get food, but don't have to. If I'm going to the movies or sporting events I eat before I go and don't buy any food there. I'm also the one who always has a pocket full of food (fun size bags of M&Ms, fruit snacks, an apple). I went out to a fancy dinner the other day with a tiny purse that you can only fit the essentials in. Everyone laughed to see that my essentials are money, cell phone, lipstick and M&Ms! M&Ms wouldn't be in anyone else's essentials, but they are of vital importance to me :)


Gluten-Free since September 15, 2005.

Peanut-Free since July 2006.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi NoGluGirl

There are some wonderfully informative governmental reports out there now regarding what we eat and the effects it has. I have obviously done a hell of a lot or research myself over the years (it took seven years to get my final diagnosis and the issues had arrisen long before that point). Equally there are far more interesting reports as to the causes of bi polar, most of which agree there is no single answer and a lot of darkness and guess work.

As to your question, no i have not. I have been on birth controll for nearly ten years now (on and off) however, due to hormonal issues im on a much lower level dose than is standard and ive never taken steriods or had asthesma.

I am interested to see how the new diet aids, I have been warened than initally i will be in for a rocky patch whilst my body gets used to the changes (as would everyone) but of course given the gravity and biological nature of those changes and adjustments there is much to look out for as they affect other aspects. Hopefully, when i get to the other side of that it should be worth it.

Dear snowcoveredheart,

Hopefully, the gluten free diet will correct this. Many people with Celiac or gluten intolerance have mental health issues as well. For me, it is depression. It is nearly impossible to be happy when you are constantly physically suffering. I too, have hormonal issues and was put on the Depo-Provera shot. Ovarian Cysts were my trouble. I had five in less than 10 months.

The research I have done on Bipolar disorder was interesting. I read that it is actually an excessive amount of serotonin, instead of the lack of it present in people with depression and anxiety.

I am curious about nutritional deficiencies concerning it. There are a number of celebrities that have Bipolar Disorder. English actor Jeremy Brett (Sherlock Holmes Mysteries), Linda Hamilton (Terminator), and soap actor Maurice Benard (Sonny Corinthos on General Hospital) all have it.

Sincerely,

NoGluGirl


Jin

Strawberry Allergy, mold allergy, dustmites allergy, ragweed allergy, dust allergy, food dye allergy - 1985

Asthma - 1994

Ovarian Cyst - May 1999

Anemia - 2000

4 More Ovarian Cysts - March 2000

Bloodwork for Celiac - November 2000 negative

Colonoscopy, Endoscopy, Intercolisis, Gastric Emptying Study - May and June 2001 negative biopsy

Fibromyalgia - June 2001

IBS - June 2001

Gallbladder Removal - July 28, 2003 after doctor said the tests showed nothing, so it was not gallbladder disease. It was very inflamed and irritated and nearly ruptured the surgeon told me at my 10 day post-op check-up.

Thyroid Disease - August 2004

Celiac Disease - March 2007 Current Dr. refers to me as Celiac, as she says blood tests are often inaccurate.

Official Purple Glittery Bat Keeper, District Attorney, and Chinese Restaurant Owner of The Silver Dragon of Rachelville

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi S,

Just wanted to welcome you to the board! I hope that you find this place a warm and supportive forum, full of education and tips for the gluten free life!

I'm happy that seeing others has given you hope. Its very hard when you don't know anyone else who has it---so seeing others who live "normal" lives makes us feel more empowered---"Hey, if they can do it, then I can!" We all started with ZERO knowledge, so its certainly possible.

We still go out, but a lot of times I'll either eat beforehand or bring food with me. Esp in the beginning, instead of going out, we had people over to the house (and still do). I have certain friends who have learned to successfully cook for me. Eating out can be tricky, but it helps to establish a relationship with a restaurant and they'll get to know you. With eating out (and, eating in!) its important to remember two things: 1. ingredients and 2. cross contamination/how its prepared.

It might be helpful to keep a food journal, and track your symptoms as well.

Let us know what we can do to help!

Laura

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Snow,

I have Bipolar II and have been off meds for nearly eight months (and so happy to be). I was doing okay but my mood seemed to change for the worse as my digestive problems increased. I was much more depressed than usual, which comes with the territory for me. I stopped eating gluten about a week ago and I really do think my mood has changed for the better. I have had BP for almost all my life so I find it hard to believe that eliminating gluten would change that but one never knows. I am hopeful.

Good luck!

RedWolfGirl

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I read that it is actually an excessive amount of serotonin, instead of the lack of it present in people with depression and anxiety.

I am curious about nutritional deficiencies concerning it.

hi,

it is that case when in manic phases - of which there is hyper and hypo. I am thankfull that ive only had one large period of hypo manic to date, which is what took me to the hospital in the first place! i dont know if deficiencies really cause or relate to BP, mush of the research is still guess work, but i am hopeful that a diet that suits me and contains fish and other benefical food sources and hopefully regulating my suagr levels will help.

S

xXx

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know if this relates at all, but I was diagnosed with Borderline Personality Disorder after years of being misdiagnosed as bipolar. My symptoms have all but vanished after being gluten free. They first started to noticeably wan after about a year gluten free, after three years gluten free I think shrinks would likely tell me I'm pretty normal. I feel healthy for the first time in my life, both emotionally and physically.

I was told by my doctors that BPD was something that I would never be able to outgrow and there was absolutely no treatment other than intense therapy. I am living proof that one can overcome the "unconquerable" mental illnesses and I did it WITHOUT intensive therapy. All I did was go gluten free.

When I get glutened I display mild symptoms of BPD. I tend to get a little paranoid, angry, and manipulative, but I have never fallen back into things fully. Hopefully the same thing will be true for you with your BP.


~Angie~

Gluten free since May 2004

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dear Snowcoveredheart,

I am glad to hear you have not had too many nasty episodes. The manic phases are difficult from what I hear. My Great Uncle was bipolar. My Aunt worried constantly about him. She never knew if he would be okay. I am sorry to say, those medications can actually do more harm than good. They changed his dose, and he committed suicide. :( My Aunt was devastated. Doctors should supervise people with this condition more carefully when they adjust medication. It made me angry the doctors were not more careful.

You mentioned your blood sugar is a problem. I am hypoglycemic, and I get mean if my blood sugar gets low or I get too hungry. It also makes me sick. I have to eat small frequenty meals in order to keep my sugar levels up. Really, one of the best things to balance blood glucose is the Zone Diet. Each meal is 30 percent fat, 30 percent protein, and 40 percent carbs. It is also easy for Celiacs to do. They discourage grains being eating often. It also helps your concentration and everything else. This eating plan seems to be the smartest out there, because it is about balance.

The only thing that was said to be mentally wrong with me was being hyper, which is difficult to deal with at times! My brain seems to be in DUH MODE a lot lately.

Dear Guhlia,

I believe that gluten free diets definately help correct mental illnesses. Also, there have been links to Schizophrenia, Alzheimer's, ADD, ADHD, Autism, and all kinds of others through heavy metal poisoning, Yeast Candida, and other dietary sensitivity issues. Once people went off of what they were allergic to (gluten, dairy, etc.) they symptoms disappeared completely! It is amazing how food can be a cure. If only more documentation existed, many other people would be walking around medication free like you!

Sincerely,

NoGluGirl


Jin

Strawberry Allergy, mold allergy, dustmites allergy, ragweed allergy, dust allergy, food dye allergy - 1985

Asthma - 1994

Ovarian Cyst - May 1999

Anemia - 2000

4 More Ovarian Cysts - March 2000

Bloodwork for Celiac - November 2000 negative

Colonoscopy, Endoscopy, Intercolisis, Gastric Emptying Study - May and June 2001 negative biopsy

Fibromyalgia - June 2001

IBS - June 2001

Gallbladder Removal - July 28, 2003 after doctor said the tests showed nothing, so it was not gallbladder disease. It was very inflamed and irritated and nearly ruptured the surgeon told me at my 10 day post-op check-up.

Thyroid Disease - August 2004

Celiac Disease - March 2007 Current Dr. refers to me as Celiac, as she says blood tests are often inaccurate.

Official Purple Glittery Bat Keeper, District Attorney, and Chinese Restaurant Owner of The Silver Dragon of Rachelville

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome to the board! You sound like you've had a rough road of it, and I hope it gets better from here.

As for the social situations, they can get tough, but *you* don't have to buy into them revolving around food. You can go to a restaurant, while your friends eat dinner, and have nothing but a glass of water, and still have a really good time enjoying the lovely, entertaining company of your friends - because the real reason you're there is your friends, not the food. It's hard to make that transition, and the expectations are always on us, so sometimes, we have to 'demand' places that are friendly to gluten free food, but we can separate the social activity from the physiologic one, and it really can help. (And you can go out with your friends doing other things than eating more often - dancing, bowling, hiking, etc.)


Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"

Inconclusive Blood Tests, Positive Dietary Results, No Endoscopy

G.F. - September 2003; C.F. - July 2004

Hiker, Yoga Teacher, Engineer, Painter, Be-er of Me

Bellevue, WA

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites