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Katester

All-purpose Flour

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I've been searching for a good gluten-free all-purpose flour for quite a while and haven't had much luck. I know many people make their own blends but to me it would be easier to buy one. I've tried Bob's Red Mill but noticed a weird texture or something. I don't know. Something wasn't right with it. I was wondering if anyone has found a good reliable gluten-free all-purpose flour that is inexpensive and does the same thing as gluten-filled all-purpose flour.


symptoms-october 5th, 2007

negative endoscopy and colonoscopy-december 2007

positive bloodwork-january 2008

diagnosed celiac-january 8, 2008

"At the end of the day, the fact that we're still here is reason enough to celebrate."

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I use Kinnickinninck all purpose flour.

their website:

http://www.kinnikinnick.com/

Sandy


Sandy

Type 1 diabetes - 1986

hypothyroid -1993

pernicious anemia

premature atrial beats

neuropathy

retinopathy

daughter is: age 15

central hypotonia and developmental delay

balance issues (rides an adult 3 wheel bike)

hypothyroid 1996

dermatographia - a form of angioedema 2002

celiac 2004 - by endoscopy

diagnosed Aspergers at age 7 - responded very well (HUGE difference) to gluten-free diet

recovered from Kawasaki (2003)

lactose intolerant - figured out in Oct/06

Gilberts syndrome (April/07)

allergy to stinging insects

scoliosis Jan 2008

nightshade intolerance - figured out April 2008

allergy to Sulfa antibiotics

son is 13

type 1 diabetic - 2003 diagnosed on his 9th birthday

celiac - 2004 by endoscopy

lactose intolerant - figured out Nov/06

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My local health food store recently gave me a bag of a new flour that they were thinking of getting in. I really liked it, especially for scalloped potatoes. It is Tom Sawyer brand. I also like this one for coating chicken etc. Another good one is Pamela's gluten-free baking mix, it makes great biscuits and stuff but does have buttermilk in it.


Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying

"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)

Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002

Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis

All bold resoved or went into remission in time with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002

 Gene Test Aug 2007

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

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I think you'll get a much better value by blending your own. Also, AFAIK there is no one single blend that will work well for everything, not to mention personal preferences. There is no gluten-free flour blend that works the same as the gluten-filled stuff. That doesn't mean you can't make delicious things with gluten-free flour, only that you need to use it differently, and the results will be somewhat different for many items. Some things can turn out close enough that nobody can tell it's gluten-free, like cookies and muffins for instance. But bread (I think white sandwich bread in particular) is one of those things with which you'll probably have to just do the best you can, and it takes practice to get really good results. Opinions on blends, mixes, and what company makes the best gluten-free bread seem to vary quite a lot.

There are a lot of suggestions on blends, so I'd look at those first. Also, start with something easy, like cookies. Then maybe try muffins, pancakes, or biscuits. Work your way into other things as you get to know how the blends work, taste, etc.

Lastly, I recommend avoiding Bob's Red Mill bean flours. They stone grind their bean flours, which creates too much heat for the oils in the beans. This leads to rancid flour, thus a foul taste. As I recall, Bob's gluten-free blend has bean flours in it.


A spherical meteorite 10 km in diameter traveling at 20 km/s has the kinetic energy equal to the calories in 550,000,000,000,000,000 Twinkies.

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to add on to what raven said: www.glutenfreeflour.com

that's the site for the tom sawyer flour, and if you read the testimonials, most people really love it...same with orgrans, and i've also heard the gluten-free pantry flour is great as well....personally, i've tried none, but i want to try the sawyer and orgran one since i've heard NOTHING but great things

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I used to mix my own, but now I use the betterbatter gluten-free flour. I don't notice any difference between it and the gluteny stuff. In fact, it was so good, I was really worried that somehow there had been a mistake and they'd shipped me real flour!

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I really like this one - it's called Domata.

Domata Living Flour, Inc.

23950 E. 2160th Road

Fair Play, MO 65649

417-276-7789 office

www.domatalivingflour.com


Bev

Mom of Garrett - Mizzou freshman; diagnosed Jan 2005

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better batter gluten free flour is my vote. you can order it online.

I've searched and searched and cant find them. Their website seems to be not there any more?

However, I"m sure that they, like every other blend, contain tapioca, which I cannot tolerate. It seems to be the key to replicating wheat flour texture . . .


Cara - 42, mom to dd 15, ds 12, ds 4

Off gluten and dairy (and tapioca ;-( ) since 11/07

A.L.C.A.T. test showed over 50 sensitive foods

Celiac panel came back negative.

Regular allergy testing reacted to every inhalant and all but 6 foods.

Slowly adding in foods, started w 19 and now have 25

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