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Villi Damage From Other Food Intolerances?


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29 replies to this topic

#1 megsylvan2

 
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Posted 04 April 2006 - 07:18 PM

Was wondering if other food intolerances cause the same villi damage that gluten does, or is this limited to gluten only? Does anyone know? I am also have significant pain and GI symptoms from egg, and was trying to figure out if it causes damage or just pain?

Thanks.
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Gluten intolerant and egg intolerant
Gluten/egg free since 11/2005 :-)

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#2 Ursa Major

 
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Posted 04 April 2006 - 07:22 PM

Apparently soy can cause the same damage to the villi as gluten. I don't know about anything else. I can't tolerate eggs, either, they will give me a terrible stomach ache and diarrhea, as well as making me feel extremely exhausted all day next day. But I don't know if they damage the villi, too. I don't really think they do, but who knows?
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I am a German citizen, married to a Canadian 29 years, four daughters, one son, seven granddaughters and four grandsons, with one more grandchild on the way in July 2009.

Intolerant to all lectins (including gluten), nightshades (potatoes, tomatoes, peppers, eggplant) and salicylates.

Asperger Syndrome, Tourette Syndrome, Addison's disease (adrenal insufficiency), hypothyroidism, fatigue syndrome, asthma

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#3 Rusla

 
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Posted 04 April 2006 - 07:26 PM

I hope nothing else does that, would be terrible. I have so many intolerances it would be a real ordeal to find out which did what.
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Rusla

Asthma-1969
wheat/ dairy allergies, lactose/casein intolerance-1980
Multiple food, environmental allergies
allergic to all antibiotics except sulpha
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gluten-free totally since Nov. 28, 2005
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#4 Rachel--24

 
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Posted 04 April 2006 - 07:37 PM

I dont think other foods cause villi damage that is seen in Celiac but they can cause imflammation of the intestinal lining. The only other protein I've heard of causing the same villi damage is casein...but its very rare.
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Rachel

#5 Carriefaith

 
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Posted 04 April 2006 - 07:39 PM

I have read that casein, the milk protein and soy can cause a "flattened or blunted intestinal surface". I read this on page 41 of Breaking the Vicious Cycle by Elaine Gottschall.
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Carrie Faith

Diagnosed with Celiac Disease in March 2004
Postitive tTg Blood Test, December 2003
Positive Biopsy, March 3, 2004

#6 Ursa Major

 
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Posted 04 April 2006 - 08:04 PM

I have read that casein, the milk protein and soy can cause a "flattened or blunted intestinal surface". I read this on page 41 of Breaking the Vicious Cycle by Elaine Gottschall.



Ouch, I guess my experimenting with ice cream and cheese this past weekend might not be a good idea then, even if I didn't get terrible diarrhea. But I am feeling very tired and listless, and have a stomach ache.
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I am a German citizen, married to a Canadian 29 years, four daughters, one son, seven granddaughters and four grandsons, with one more grandchild on the way in July 2009.

Intolerant to all lectins (including gluten), nightshades (potatoes, tomatoes, peppers, eggplant) and salicylates.

Asperger Syndrome, Tourette Syndrome, Addison's disease (adrenal insufficiency), hypothyroidism, fatigue syndrome, asthma

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#7 Carriefaith

 
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Posted 04 April 2006 - 08:06 PM

But I am feeling very tired and listless, and have a stomach ache.

I'm sorry that you aren't feeling well :(
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Carrie Faith

Diagnosed with Celiac Disease in March 2004
Postitive tTg Blood Test, December 2003
Positive Biopsy, March 3, 2004

#8 TCA

 
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Posted 04 April 2006 - 08:11 PM

I've just started thinking about other foods too. The word "intolerance" is so broad. If someone is lactose intolerant, it gives them an upset stomach to eat it, but does it do any real damage to the body? (I saw Carrie's post on casein, but just using an ex.) I know I have a bad mold allergy and cheddar cheese gives me a headache because of it. I try to avoid it, but occationally will eat a little because my husband loves it and I'll cook something with it for him. Am I actualy doing damage to my body or just have a headache for a day? I know what gluten did, but are there other ways damage is going on in my body when I eat something I am slightly allergic to or intolerant of? :huh:
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#9 Carriefaith

 
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Posted 04 April 2006 - 08:17 PM

I know what gluten did, but are there other ways damage is going on in my body when I eat something I am slightly allergic to or intolerant of?

I'm not really sure... I'm guessing that casein and soy could cause intestinal damage; however, I am not sure if intestinal damage from soy or casein is common. I would suggest getting allergy and intolerance tests to see if you are allergic/intolernce to certain foods.
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Carrie Faith

Diagnosed with Celiac Disease in March 2004
Postitive tTg Blood Test, December 2003
Positive Biopsy, March 3, 2004

#10 darlindeb25

 
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Posted 05 April 2006 - 02:48 AM

I don't know the answer to this either, but it would seem to me that any grains could cause the damage, but if its the gliatins in the wheat, rye, barley, and oats that does it, then maybe not. I do know I cant tolerate soy or corn now and I think rice is going too. No tomatoes and starches are out. Deb
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Deb
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We urge all doctors to take time to listen to your patients.. don't "isolate" symptoms but look at the whole spectrum. If a patient tells you s/he feels as if s/he's falling apart and "nothing seems to be working properly", chances are s/he's right!

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#11 Carriefaith

 
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Posted 05 April 2006 - 05:59 AM

I have read before that the casein and soy proteins are similar to gluten. Maybe casein and soy are sometimes confused with gluten in people with celiac disease, and the antibodies attack the intestinal wall because the protein is mistaken for gluten? I don't believe that this would happen to everyone with celiac disease, but maybe to those people who have a major intolerance/allergy to casein or soy. Just a thought.
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Carrie Faith

Diagnosed with Celiac Disease in March 2004
Postitive tTg Blood Test, December 2003
Positive Biopsy, March 3, 2004

#12 Nancym

 
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Posted 05 April 2006 - 06:42 AM

I don't think other food intolerances have been as studied as wheat has been.
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#13 cornbread

 
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Posted 06 April 2006 - 03:00 PM

Enterolab now do IgA tests for soy, yeast and egg (as well as casein and gluten). I came back positive for everything but egg. They told me that it was their belief that any food that causes an abnormal rise in IgA antibodies could do the same damage as gluten. For example, whichever food triggers that reaction, to your body it is the same reaction. It's not actually the gluten that causes your body harm, it's the autoimmune *reaction* that the gluten triggers in your body that causes the damage - and as well all know, the damage isn't always limited to the gut, it can be arthritis, MS, excema, etc. To me that theory makes too much sense to ignore. Your body doesn't care whether it's gluten or casein or pickled frog that you ate, if it launches an IgA reaction, you are in trouble.

The grey area arises when you don't know whether it was an IgA or IgG reaction that you had. I can't tolerate eggs these days, but I tested for them twice via Enterolab (IgA test) and each time the showed no abnormal IgA reaction. However, they were the only thing that came back positive on my IgG food allergy blood test. So that means I am certainly reacting, but it is an IgG reaction, ie: something I can hopefully get over in time. The IgA stuff though, that's for life and I take it as seriously as gluten.

Here's the link to the Enterolab IgA tests for soy, yeast and egg:
https://www.enterola...m#egg_yeast_soy
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#14 JAMR

 
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Posted 16 June 2009 - 07:06 PM

There have been tests run on calves to show that soy does damage the villi and create the same issues for malabsorption that occurs with celiac. Given the other indications, I would take it as given that it does the same in humans. Also note that the IgA tests that are being done for soy, should note that the tTG IgA appears to be specific only to gluten/gliadin. This means that a negative for ttg does not mean a negative to soy intolerance.
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#15 TotalKnowledge

 
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Posted 17 June 2009 - 10:50 AM

It would make sense if they *can*. Not many other substances are as ubiquitous in the typical modern diet as wheat however. Since someone with a gluten intolerance can not subconsciously avoid gluten it might do more damage to the intestine.

Just my supposition there. No scientific backing or proof.
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