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danikali

What Are Your Thoughts On.....

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Hi,

Just wondering which of you stay completely away from products that were made in an environment with wheat (or any gluten for that matter), and which of you don't count that as being a possible risk for contamination.

I finally got a reply back from Atkins, by phone stating that their protein bars (most of them) are gluten free, but she said that she wanted me to know that it is also made in a factory where wheat is used. Her exact words are 'I wouldn't say that you are 100% safe eating one of our non-gluten products."

Well, I bought the bar. Should I eat it? What would you do?

Thanks!

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Guest nini

I think it really depends... When I contact a company I pay attention to how knowledgeable they seem to be about gluten and cross contamination issues etc... Some companies may produce gluten free stuff in the same facility with gluten stuff, but in a different area, or after the lines have been thoroughly cleaned... If they tell me they can't guarantee 100% gluten free, I'm less likely to want to risk it, sure, but it just all depends. I eat Amy's foods that are produced in a facility that also produces wheat containing products, and I know that some people have reacted to some of their products, I think though that as a company they are very aware of the issue and try very hard. Other companies, I'm just not so sure they try hard at all...

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That's a tough one....In an ideal world, I wouldn't eat any products like that, but that's not realistic either. Until some essential products are made in wheat free facilities, I try it and see what my body thinks.

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Sometimes I wonder about just how far is too far. At times I think all plant products, whether processed or not, should carry the warning:

Grown on a planet where wheat is grown.

JK. I think :ph34r:

But seriously, I know cross contamination is a risk, but at what point do you say it is small enough that you no longer care. I am sitting at the keyboard right now, but a few hours ago I went outside and drove my car. There was a risk that some other driver would do something that caused an accident that I was involved in, causing me serious injury or death. I drove the car anyway.

I believe that most situations are safe for most people. I'm cautious, but not paranoid. There are too many lawyers (no offense to broncobux) blaming anybody and everybody for whatever happens, and that is why there are so many "cover your ass" disclaimers on labels today. :rolleyes:

My two cents, for what its worth.

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I've been doing some reading at the FDA web site and Kosher web site. I don't know how commonly this happens, but if they've got some product from another run with wheat, they're allowed to mix the left over stuff with the next stuff they run through. So lets say they're making cookies. They could be switching over to chocolate chip from raisin but have a bit of the raisin stuff still in the machines. They could just go ahead and incorporate that into the chocolate chip dough and not even bother to report the raisins on the package.

However, Kosher laws are really strict and they don't allow that sort of stuff. So it might be beneficial to look for the Kosher certification.

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I've given up on products like that. Now I stay away from them. Just too tired of unexpected gluten accidents.

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I think any food produced on a line that produces gluten-containing food should NOT be allowed to be labelled as gluten-free. Period. The food should carry a warning that says it was produced in a facility that processes gluten. If this means that most products on the planet need to carry this warning, then so be it. This will give the consumers all the information they need to make an informed choice. Those who don't care, can go ahead and consume the product. Those of us who do care can then avoid the product. Nobody gets hurt, and we are all happy.

Personally, I'm tired of getting sick, and going through the process of contacting the manufacturer of the 'gluten-free' product, only to be told that the product is processed on the same line as cereal breakfast bars, or that the cocoa is processed on the line that makes wheat flour. Or that the gluten-free unflavored potato chips are packaged on the same line as the flavored and gluten-containing potato chips.

But I'm one step ahead of the food manufacturers....because I eventually just stopped buying and consuming these products. I got sick so often, that it just wasn't worth the bother.

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i asked our ped gi about this-----he says that companies that put that on their label are just to lazy to check their stuff----or something to that effect.

christine

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Guest cassidy
I think any food produced on a line that produces gluten-containing food should NOT be allowed to be labelled as gluten-free. Period.

I completely agree with this. I tried eating Amy's products, most of which now have the label that they are produced in a facility with wheat, although they say gluten-free on the front. Most of the Amy's stuff has made me sick. I called them and they reimbursed me for what I bought. They made it seem like there weren't many people who have had reactions to their products, althought I have seen many posts on this board. I would encourage anyone who has had a reaction to call them.

I think it should be my choice whether I want to risk cross contaimination and by companies putting gluten-free on risky foods it is very misleading. If something says gluten-free, you shouldn't have to read any farther, you should be able to know absolutely that it is safe.

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That's it. I agree with gabby. I'm sick of being sick, and I DO care about the CC because I am obviously very very sensitive. When I don't eat anything processed, AT ALL, I feel like a million dollars, literally. But then I go back to trying the 'gluten free' stuff, and here I am again, symptoms popping up all over the place.

I get mad and jealous because it's not fair that EVERYONE AROUND ME can have anything on any shelve, in any store and that's why I tell myself that I'm being 'too causious' and should relax a little. But I CAN'T, and that is what I have to realize, PERIOD! I am not like them, and just because it says 'gluten free' obviously doesn't mean Sh*t for me because if there is any little sign of gluten, I AM SICK!

To those of you that CAN have those products labeled 'gluten free' I am so happy, FOR YOU! But not all of us are that lucky, and it's nothing to joke about.

In the meantime, are there ANY facilities out there that DO NOT make ANY products with gluten in them, therefore, have NO RISK of CC?

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I will not knowingly eat anything that has been produced in a building with wheat produced products. Even if they sterilize the equipment, there could be wheat dust on the lights, rafters etc.

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In the meantime, are there ANY facilities out there that DO NOT make ANY products with gluten in them, therefore, have NO RISK of CC?

Whole Foods gluten-free Bakehouse stuff is all made in a dedicated facility....same with Kinnikinnick and Enjoy Life. There is no chance of C.C.

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Hi,

Just wondering which of you stay completely away from products that were made in an environment with wheat (or any gluten for that matter), and which of you don't count that as being a possible risk for contamination.

I finally got a reply back from Atkins, by phone stating that their protein bars (most of them) are gluten free, but she said that she wanted me to know that it is also made in a factory where wheat is used. Her exact words are 'I wouldn't say that you are 100% safe eating one of our non-gluten products."

Well, I bought the bar. Should I eat it? What would you do?

Thanks!

Hi,

This is to answer some of the manufacturer's comments. I work at a commerical bakery that produces "health" foods for the health food stores across the country. We make gluten free products that are made in a facility that also uses spelt and wheat flour. We are a small bakery that most batches are about 150 pound in size. We only make gluten free products on a particular day of the week. Due to our small size, we feel that we can prevent cross contamination. We have never had a complaint.

YES, we do put on the label, made in a facitily with Wheat. The great piece of news that effective 1-1-06 ALL manufacturers must put an allegren statement on their label, not only what allegrens are in the product, but also what's made in the plant. It will take another couple of months before this starts showing up in the stores due to the inventories of food distributors.

This is the FDA web page with their press release: http://www.fda.gov/bbs/topics/NEWS/2005/NEW01281.html

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I have though alot on this and theres realy only conculusion I can come up with.

I refuse to life in fear.

If I get burned some place (like mcdonalds) I will aviod that place, food, what ever, and stay away from odviosuly stupid places (high gluten envrioments like dunkin doughnuts), but beyond that I will take my chances.

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I will eat stuff that says gluten free but then says made in a facilty that also.... cause I figure they are doing that to cover their a$$. I'm pretty sensitive though, so I don't know that I should be doing that per se. I know that if I just dropped food on my messy countertop, I would not eat it, because my husband cooks sometimes with flour and eats lots of gluteny stuff. However, that stuff is IN my kitchen all the time. So it's just really hard to know exactly how close your product has been to wheat. And this is not something to play trial and error with. We can just dream that the FDA will one day help us out here.

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I'm pretty leary of getting glutened. I have Amy's frozen dinners, and I like them, but I don't think I'll be eating them any longer because of the potential for cross-contamination. . . . . Lynne

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I've given up on products like that. Now I stay away from them. Just too tired of unexpected gluten accidents.

Ditto

My husband and I made this decision yesterday after I was glutened by Van's waffles. I know that is a product many of you and your children are able to depend on. I had suspected them as a source of glutening for me, but as of yesterday there is no doubt. I will contact the company today. This is just the most recent of a fairly long list of my glutenings from gluten-free products "manufactured in a plant that also processes foods containing wheat."

Do I get glutened from all such manufacturers? Nope. But the "surprises" are too frequent. I'd rather be beaten than glutened. For me, I am going to stay away from restaurants and most prepared foods choosing to cook from scratch in my gluten-free kitchen for awhile. I need the rest.

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Maybe when I get more better (HA! take that english teachers :lol: ) I will notice it like you all mention, cause right now I never do.

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To quote Vincent, I refuse to live my life in fear. When I finally got a biopsy with a positive diagnosis, I was almost healed. I will avoid known and suspect items, but I use wheat flour and breads in my house for the rest of my family, so even food I make at home would have to be labelled "made in a facility that processes wheat." I have to eat to live, so for some brands, I will take my chances. For lesser known brands, I don't chance it.

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i'm really having a hard time making a decision on this issue with the varied answers everyone has given. my kids don't have obvious symptoms to gluten, or we just haven't been gluten free long enough to know what gluten symptoms they would get.........also, how do we know if the symptom is actually from gluten, or if it is from some other component of the food, or maybe is just a "bug" going around? so far, we have avoided most things that are produced in the same facility as wheat. it seems to me that the nature of the foods themselves would give a clue to how likely they are to have CC. canned beans produced in the same facility don't seem like they would be as likely to be contaminated as bread produced in the same facility. i would really like to NOT worry about this disclaimer on foods, but so far, i am afraid to chance it.

christine

i just thought of something else. isn't this why we have periodic blood tests, to see how well we are staying gluten free? if my children don't have obvious symptoms, this seems like the only way we would really be able to tell.

christine

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Chrissy, you'll find your way through. The important thing to remember is that there's not a right or wrong answer to your questions. Take one track, and if it doesn't work for your family then change tracks. You're right, with blood tests, you'll know. Through obvious symptoms you'll have guidance. Best of luck to you and your family.

I have though alot on this and theres realy only conculusion I can come up with.

I refuse to life in fear.

It's not living in fear to avoid processing environments that have caused definite and severe gluten reactions. Avoidance is the only rational course for me (and I'm sure others) at this here-and-now point in my life. (confirmed diagnosis December '05 only after an unexplained weight loss of 35 lbs in 8 wks).

The fear for me is in the gamble. Of the foods/manufacturers I've tried where wheat and gluten-free are processed in the same location, about 1/2 of them have caused me to be sick. I will continue to eat those that haven't caused a reaction. I will, of course, not eat those that have caused a reaction.

I will eat those foods that seem safe to me already. I will not, however, subject my body to being a guinea pig anymore. I HATE BEING GLUTENED. I AM SICK OF BEING SICK.

Chrissy, you asked, "also, how do we know if the symptom is actually from gluten, or if it is from some other component of the food, or maybe is just a "bug" going around?"

For me, it's not so much "is it a glutening?" As it was "Where did the gluten come from?" For me, being glutened has an entirely different feel than gi viruses, etc. Once glutened I feel like I have food poisoning plus a hang-over plus my body feels beaten while my gut feels like it's being scrapped out by fingernails. Your children may not have this distinction or may not be old enough to be able to realize/express the difference. Being Celiac does not have degrees of severity, just the symptoms do. As a celiac disease newbie I made a lot of mistakes at first but am quickly learning. I don't introduce myself to more than one new food at time now. I used to be a lot more naive thinking that if a food was supposed to be gluten-free, well then, it must be gluten-free.

My symptoms are severe. I had known for almost a year that something was pretty wrong and that I needed to get to a gi. I put it off because of the severe illness of a close family member. I really thought, "Ok, we're going to get 'family member' over his illness and then I'll take time to have the tests etc that I knew would be forthcoming." I'd never heard of Celiac until I was laying in the hospital bed. Celiac didn't wait for me to decide it was convenient. While I was busy putting off a dr.'s visit, Celiac was busy ravaging my small intestine.

Live in fear? No. Been there. Make decisions to regain my health? You can bet on it!

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