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Hi, I've recently had to start eating gluten-free and I'm still learning to say the least. I was wondering if everything that says it is gluten-free actually is gluten-free?? I had some salad dressing that said on the back that it was gluten free but it still seemed to bother me, so I'm not sure if it was that or something else in it or with my stomache.

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Hi, I've recently had to start eating gluten-free and I'm still learning to say the least. I was wondering if everything that says it is gluten-free actually is gluten-free?? I had some salad dressing that said on the back that it was gluten free but it still seemed to bother me, so I'm not sure if it was that or something else in it or with my stomache.

Welcome to the forum!

When we're new, it seems like we can react to most anything and everything. And since the FDA has not come up with guidelines as to what exactly constitutes gluten-free, we are at the mercy of manufacturers, some of whom are very good about testing and labeling. Or you could be reacting to an ingredient in the salad dressing even if it is gluten-free or to something you ate a day or two earlier. 'Tis all such a puzzle.

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From what I've last found, (which it seems "facts" can be changed every day <_<) gluten free can actually be 20 ppm gluten. Has anyone else heard of that one? So, that would mean that even if it says "gluten free" it isn't always 100% gluten free. Some products are really and truly free of all gluten, but then products can be labeled as gluten free with that 20ppm level. The food industry has put up a long, hard battle to keep from having to put what is in their foods on the label and so it makes it really difficult to buy prepared foods. If only they knew how many struggling Celiacs there are who would buy their foods if they could be sure they wouldn't get "glutened" with them! Watch the "natural flavors" in foods. They can be the culprit a lot of times and often it is from barley or corn (if corn is a problem for you like it is for me, watch out ... it is everywhere)

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I had some salad dressing that said on the back that it was gluten free but it still seemed to bother me, so I'm not sure if it was that or something else in it or with my stomache.

When I was first diagnosed it seemed like everything set me off and I felt like I was having a reaction. I remember reacting to a mixture of red wine vinegar and olive oil that had been drizzled over a salad -- it was agony. You might just want to go very simple and natural in terms of meals for a few weeks and then slowly add foods back in. This has been working for me although at 5+ months in I still have to be careful about anything acidic and I can't do anything particularly spicy at this point. Hopefully it will all come in time.

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From what I've last found, (which it seems "facts" can be changed every day <_<) gluten free can actually be 20 ppm gluten. Has anyone else heard of that one? So, that would mean that even if it says "gluten free" it isn't always 100% gluten free. Some products are really and truly free of all gluten, but then products can be labeled as gluten free with that 20ppm level. The food industry has put up a long, hard battle to keep from having to put what is in their foods on the label and so it makes it really difficult to buy prepared foods. If only they knew how many struggling Celiacs there are who would buy their foods if they could be sure they wouldn't get "glutened" with them! Watch the "natural flavors" in foods. They can be the culprit a lot of times and often it is from barley or corn (if corn is a problem for you like it is for me, watch out ... it is everywhere)

Corn is a problem for you as a celiac or for a different reason? Corn meal and tortilla's are my go to! AHHAHAHAHHAAA!

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Some people have additional food intolerances such as corn or soy, but I believe most celiacs are safe with corn. If you have just started the diet, you may have stomach problems just because you aren't healed yet; it doesn't always mean that you've been glutened or have additional intolerances.

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