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beebs

Would You Try Oats.....

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If you had a severe reaction to gluten? I really want to, I would love to be able to eat oats, but I read that 1 in 5 Coeliacs react to the gluten like protein found in oats. To be honest it scares me big time.

If you do react to oats - is the reaction as bad as what you get with gluten??

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I seem to do okay with oats. I buy gluten-free BRM. I think I was gluten-free for 9 months before I tried it. I have it occasionally, not every day, but it used to be my favorite breakfast. I think the only way you'll find out is to try it.

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I accidentally tried oats when I ate some cinnamon cookies and later found out they had oats. I did have a reaction but for me it was not as bad as with other gluten reactions. Most doctors recommend waiting atleast a year before you try oats. Like she said, the only way to know is if you try them.

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Most celiacs tolerate oats. I read wait 2 years before trying them. (everyone has a theory) :lol:

When it is described as a "gluten reaction", it means you may have digestive issues.

It will not give you any neuro issues. Nothing I have read indicates that will happen, if that is your worry.

And it certainly will not cause a gluten autoimmune response in you. (provided they are gluten-free)

You might just get a tummy ache.

I LOVE oatmeal. I patiently waited 10 months.

I tried them. I got a tummy ache.

I waited another 6 months. Yup, same thing.

I can wait another six months. :)

I tolerate foods that I could not previously, so maybe I will get them back too.

EVERYBODY is different, so your experience may vary.

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I have been gluten free for 2 years now. I tried oatmeal a year in...got a little sick and thought I needed more time. Tried oatmeal again on my 2 year free mark which was a few weeks ago and got VERY sick. I had nausea and a super bad stomach ache for about a week. I had forgotten what it was like to have that crampy stomach all the time. I honestly can't believe I spent years feeling that way all the time. I felt like I had done 4 thousand sit ups...and of course had bad D.

So...personally I'm done. But when you have a limited diet I think it's okay to test a couple of times after you've given yourself some healing time. I keep trying milk every year too. I don't have milk back, but I can handle a little butter on occasion now, and sometimes even chocolate. So, even though the reaction to oats was terrible and awful, I think it's worth trying.

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I suggest that if you try them, be sure to try a very small amount the first time. My reaction to oats seemed worse than my reaction to gluten, and it wasn't only stomach issues. It was early on, and I won't be trying them again to be sure any time soon.

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Event my "gluten free" oats said they can be called that with some gluten. Be careful. I am not eating any for now.

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Event my "gluten free" oats said they can be called that with some gluten.

?? I'm sorry, but can you explain what that means, please.

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Beebs, here is some interesting research on oats.

Some people react to Avenin in oats.

"There may exist a sub-set of celiacs who also have avenin-reactive mucosal T-cells, avenin being the oat counterpart to wheat's gliadin". You can read more here:

http://www.celiac.com/articles/840/1/Oats-Intolerance-in-Celiac-Disease/Page1.html

Also:

http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/securit/allerg/cel-coe/oats_cd-avoine-eng.php

http://wheat.pw.usda.gov/ggpages/topics/Celiac.vs.grains.html

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Event my "gluten free" oats said they can be called that with some gluten. Be careful. I am not eating any for now.

The problem is that there are no tests sensitive enough that can test to zero ppm...if that's what you mean. But that holds true for other processed foods, too, not just oats.

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Oats don't like me. But everyone has their own body and needs to find out for them selves how things affect them. This is a trial and error business we are in.

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This is a trial and error business we are in.

oh boy, have you got that right, brother :)

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Some of those reactions sounds scary. I don't know if I could face it to be honest!

The gluten free products here in Australia have to be <3ppm - I am absolutely fine with gluten-free products so I'm sure that won't be an issue. Just if I am unlucky enough to react to oats. I'll have a read of those links Irish - Thanks!!

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This gal can't do oats, pure oats, no cross-contaminated and tested oats. No how.

No corn gluten either.

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I can do corn, do you think that makes a difference?

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I can do corn, do you think that makes a difference?

I don't know...I was still having random emotional rollar coasters, and it was a tremendous effort to get myself out of bed in the morning. (I LOVE popcorn made stovetop style as an evening snack).My sister (also gluten-free/df and corn free) suggested I give it a try. Wow. What a difference.

I also had my NAET practioner test me (applied kinesilogy) and I was very weak when I held the corn gluten vial. My children seem to be OK with it, but not my sister and I. Doc Osborn who has youtube videos about living gluten-free free has suggested that corn may not be ok for all who are gluten sensitive.

I'll try introducing it again someday; just to see, but not until I finish my "to do" list! I'm getting so much done!

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I can do corn, do you think that makes a difference?

Nope.

I can do corn IF it is not cross contaminated, which is difficult to find. Don't have a fresh corn problem.

Have not had any inkling to "try" straight oats after a few rounds of accidentally eating very small amounts which were not declared to be in "gluten free" food, and reacting very poorly to them, the same way as if I were glutened, in fact, worse than gluten because it hit my gut harder, and I get mostly neuro symptoms instead when actually glutened. This was oat bran in some allegedly "gluten free" chips that I ate, one time eating them on New Year's Eve, which led to the creation of My Prime Directive: Never Eat A New Food On The Eve Of A Holiday, Especially If You Had Plans. That was the year after I managed to be the only person who has ever been badly glutened by a famous restaurant with a gluten free menu and a normally good protocol, so I won't slam them here for the freak occurrence, which had me swearing off of eating out on holidays if I had plans the next day, because you might get the second string working the restaurant.

It took me what seems like forever to figure this out, that I am sensitive enough to oats that I can not use products made in an oat processing facility, and I don't know that I would have, except that I had a great conversation with another celiac who runs a gluten free store and I started trying other brands of gluten free flours - I had it down to where I knew it was something at home that was getting me, because I was even eating out and not reacting, then eating at home and having problems,and I was getting to where I was self- testing food items one by one in essential form.

Since I stopped with the oat cc'd products this December, after the last round, I am a LOT healthier.

I do buy the gluten free oats for my spouse, he eats them a lot for breakfast, but he knows about cross contamination, and this was we still keep wheat, rye, and barley out of the house.

This sort of surprised me, as I am able to eat a lot of other foods. And I ate oats years ago before the diet change. Good grief, my ancestors. Imagine some poor Irishman not able to chow down on oats. Cabbage, cabbage, cabbage. :blink:

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My birthday was last tuesday, and it was decided that that was the day I could have and do anything I want. I wanted muffins.

I didn't want to spend hours making them, and I didn't want to buy 1000 ingredients, so I bought a bag of of my favorite shake and bake gluten-free chocolate muffins. I checked the ingredients, and it contained oat flour. I knew there was a chance I'd react, but oat flour is my favorite, and the label stated chocolate chip muffins, so nothing was going to stop me. Boy were they ever so good. I ate three the first day, and had mild cramps the next morning. I didn't think much of it, so I had more in the evening, and just a few hours after, I was in so much pain and agony from cramps + bloat that I couldn't sleep that night. I had residual cramps for two days after. (EDIT: I forgot to mention that the cramps came with a DH flare)

The good news is that it doesn't seem to be a long-term reaction thing, as it usually is with really being glutened. I'm not too fatigued, no infections or swelling, and I'm not a grouchketeer.

It all boils down to weather you like oats enough to try them now, or try them in two years when the chances you will react might be slimmer. How much do you like oats? ;-)

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I don't love oats - but to be honest, I despise rice porridge and most bread and all that stuff= so I am finding breakfast really hard - especially to find something filling. Arrghh.

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I don't love oats - but to be honest, I despise rice porridge and most bread and all that stuff= so I am finding breakfast really hard - especially to find something filling. Arrghh.

Can you do nuts? You can have a bowl of roasted nuts, pealed and diced apple or pear, and topped with honey or maple syrup. Very filling, nutritious and really yummy. You can even sprinkle a little Cinnamon on them. These days I have a bowl of frozen mango for breakfast. It would never have been enough for me before I went on the elimination diet, but when I started the diet and could literally have nothing but meat and leaf-greens, I truly missed fruits, nuts, and lots of vegetables. When I could add some of them back, I was totally satisfied by eating a plate of carrots and tomatoes. A bit of tomato could put me in bliss like soul food. Deprivation teaches us to enjoy and celebrate what food we can have, so don't worry too much about feeling full. It will come when your body starts adapting.. and then when you can find something new, just a little of it will be enough. I hope I was clear in what I was trying to say.

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I don't love oats - but to be honest, I despise rice porridge and most bread and all that stuff= so I am finding breakfast really hard - especially to find something filling. Arrghh.

Hot Buckwheat cereal with maple syrup and banana.

Quinoa flakes with agave syrup and berries.

Paleo bread (made with coconut and almond flour and flax seed)-moist and delicious, with some butter.

These are all full of protein and fiber and keep me going for hours.

ETA: um, "going"--as in energy-wise--not "going" to the loo :lol:

In fact, these also help with keeping all that "in order". ;)

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I get a terrible reaction to oats. I have not tried any but Quaker though...

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I get a terrible reaction to oats. I have not tried any but Quaker though...

Quaker oats are not considered gluten free. Even Quaker will tell you that. Regular oats are cc'd with wheat during growing, harvesting, or shipping.

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Quaker oats are not considered gluten free. Even Quaker will tell you that. Regular oats are cc'd with wheat during growing, harvesting, or shipping.

well, I was just going to say this, but....I'll just say DITTO!! and yeah, what SHE said ! :)

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So from what I see here, oats might give a digestive issue, but no damage? So maybe, seeing I don't get much by way of digestive issues, I might be able to eat them? It's been almost a year gluten-free now. I think I may just try oats, and if they work, I can get oat flour?

Now, something a bit off topic:

Dani, every time I scroll down and see your picture I think, "What a very pretty woman!" I'm sure everyone here will agree with me. Your old picture was nice, but this new one is even better. I just wanted to let you know. We all need a lift from time to time, and I hope this puts a smile on your face. You may not FEEL good, but you LOOK good. I'm just the opposite today. Feeling pretty good, but my thinning hair is making it harder and harder to look good every day. (Time to start looking at wigs I guess. :huh: )

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