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An Immune Disorder At The Root Of Autism (Op Ed From Nytimes)


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#1 Takala

 
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Posted 26 August 2012 - 06:47 AM

This was on the opinion pages of the New York Times, 8/26/12, by Moises Velasquez-Manoff

Immune Disorders and Autism http://www.nytimes.c...1&smid=tw-share

While it is not about celiac per se, it does mention celiac as a risk factor for autism. And as of 4 years ago, that was nearly biological heresy on the internet discussion boards. So this article is a very interesting read. ;)

Better clues to the causes of the autism phenomenon come from parallel “epidemics.” The prevalence of inflammatory diseases in general has increased significantly in the past 60 years. As a group, they include asthma, now estimated to affect 1 in 10 children — at least double the prevalence of 1980 — and autoimmune disorders, which afflict 1 in 20.

Both are linked to autism, especially in the mother. One large Danish study, which included nearly 700,000 births over a decade, found that a mother’s rheumatoid arthritis, a degenerative disease of the joints, elevated a child’s risk of autism by 80 percent. Her celiac disease, an inflammatory disease prompted by proteins in wheat and other grains, increased it 350 percent. Genetic studies tell a similar tale. Gene variants associated with autoimmune disease — genes of the immune system — also increase the risk of autism, especially when they occur in the mother.

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So does metabolic syndrome, a disorder associated with insulin resistance, obesity and, crucially, low-grade inflammation. The theme here is maternal immune dysregulation.


The author also notes that as we humans become better at preventing infections and parasites (thanks to vaccines, antibiotics, hygiene, etc) there is this parallel phenomena of the rate of other inflammatory diseases going UP ^.

What is interesting to me, as a gluten intolerant person (or perpetually undiagnosed celiac), was the initial reaction from the "anti" gluten intolerant-it's all a fad diet/pro GMO faction (yes, there is such a thing :rolleyes: ) - they are very upset with this hypothesis appearing in the New York Times.

I think that it is very interesting, and you should read it. Fear of observed phenomena (and God forbid, it was a Danish study, we Americans all know Europeans can't possibly get anything right :blink: ) and possible explanations of what could be happening, provoking cries of "we must attack this" instead of their very own peer reviewed proof isn't really the scientific method, either. The use of the word probiotic as a possible treatment for inflammation, will probably send several of them off of deep edge. B)
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#2 pricklypear1971

 
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Posted 26 August 2012 - 07:29 AM

Very interesting. I haven't read the original, but this opinion piece is very thought provoking.

I pick up on points other than what you mention. All in all, I find the research mentioned very encouraging.

Where do I stand in line for my parasite???
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Apparently there is nothing that cannot happen today. ~ Mark Twain

Probable Endometriosis, in remission from childbirth since 2002.
Hashimoto's DX 2005.
Gluten-Free since 6/2011.
DH (and therefore Celiac) dx from ND
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Responsive to iodine withdrawal for DH (see quote, above).

Genetic tests reveal half DQ2, half DQ8 - I'm a weird bird!

#3 GFinDC

 
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Posted 26 August 2012 - 09:51 AM

You can keep the parasites. The idea of maternal inflammation causing autism seems reasonable. Maybe there will be some new treatments developed because of it. Hopefully anyhow.
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Proverbs 25:16 "Hast thou found honey? eat so much as is sufficient for thee, lest thou be filled therewith, and vomit it."
Job 30:27 My bowels boiled, and rested not: the days of affliction prevented me.
Thyroid cyst and nodules, Lactose / casein intolerant. Diet positive, gene test pos, symptoms confirmed by Dr-head. My current bad list is: gluten, dairy, sulfites, coffee (the devil's brew), tea, Bug's Bunnies carrots, garbanzo beans of pain, soy- no joy, terrible turnips, tomatoes, peppers, potatoes, and hard work. have a good day! :-) Paul

#4 Kate79

 
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Posted 27 August 2012 - 06:08 AM

Very interesting. I haven't read the original, but this opinion piece is very thought provoking.

I pick up on points other than what you mention. All in all, I find the research mentioned very encouraging.

Where do I stand in line for my parasite???


Right here: http://www.thisameri...enemy-camp-2010

NPR did the above story about a British man who infected himself with hookworm to treat his debilitating allergies/asthma. Apparently it worked, and for awhile he was selling his 'treatment' online, but I'm pretty sure he got shutdown.
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#5 pricklypear1971

 
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Posted 27 August 2012 - 07:01 AM

Right here: http://www.thisameri...enemy-camp-2010

NPR did the above story about a British man who infected himself with hookworm to treat his debilitating allergies/asthma. Apparently it worked, and for awhile he was selling his 'treatment' online, but I'm pretty sure he got shutdown.


Thanks!

I think I'll wait til they refine it a little better :).

I'm also interested in boone repopulation. I hope they find something effective in that area, and fast.
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Apparently there is nothing that cannot happen today. ~ Mark Twain

Probable Endometriosis, in remission from childbirth since 2002.
Hashimoto's DX 2005.
Gluten-Free since 6/2011.
DH (and therefore Celiac) dx from ND
.
Responsive to iodine withdrawal for DH (see quote, above).

Genetic tests reveal half DQ2, half DQ8 - I'm a weird bird!

#6 1974girl

 
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Posted 27 August 2012 - 10:35 AM

Very interesting. I hope the women on the pregnancy board here will at least take a probiotic.
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#7 plumbago

 
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Posted 28 August 2012 - 05:26 AM

I got to that NYT article on autism from Michael Pollan's tweet.

Interesting, but also annoying in that there is, in relation to celiac disease, a kind of loose-ended statement:

One large Danish study, which included nearly 700,000 births over a decade, found that a mother’s rheumatoid arthritis, a degenerative disease of the joints, elevated a child’s risk of autism by 80 percent. Her celiac disease, an inflammatory disease prompted by proteins in wheat and other grains, increased it 350 percent.

One, that's assuming a mother - who could be aged, what? 18-47? - ALREADY HAS rheumatoid arthritis. Ok, sure, it is definitely possible. But the second part about Celiac.

After being seen by a professional who is on the leading edge of celiac disease research, I have learned that celiac disease exists only when it is UNTREATED. So let's say the pregnant woman is eating gluten free? Does this still hold? I always wish that the writers would specify: treated or untreated. It makes such a difference.

Second, wasn't it also only a couple of days ago that articles began appearing about how the age of fathers has possibly increased the incidence of schizophrenia and autism?

Which is it? Older fathers or inflammed mothers???

Plumbago
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#8 nvsmom

 
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Posted 06 September 2012 - 01:51 PM

Disturbing article... my first born son has some celiac and hypothyroidism symptoms (tested negative to celiac) and is (partially) diagnosed with Aspergers (we didn't finish the diagnosis since there is no benefit to it at this time). I had untreated celiac and hypothyroidism while pregnant with him, and I'm starting to wonder about RA since I had a positive RF test decades ago.

I've seen a few articles like this.

Jeez... I wish I'd known
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#9 beebs

 
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Posted 06 September 2012 - 03:56 PM

Wow, this is fascinating stuff, I have autoimmune arthritis and celiac and two of my kids have ASD and are both suspected celiacs. We all have asthma. I always thought there was probably a connection.
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#10 MegRie

 
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Posted 13 October 2012 - 08:27 PM

Disturbing article... my first born son has some celiac and hypothyroidism symptoms (tested negative to celiac) and is (partially) diagnosed with Aspergers (we didn't finish the diagnosis since there is no benefit to it at this time). I had untreated celiac and hypothyroidism while pregnant with him, and I'm starting to wonder about RA since I had a positive RF test decades ago.

I've seen a few articles like this.

Jeez... I wish I'd known



Hi,
I know that this can be a sensitive subject, but I just wanted to suggest that you may want to finish getting a diagnosis for your son. I work with adults with special needs and those who were not diagnosed before adulthood are not eligible for some types of financial aid! At least at this point in time. :/
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#11 come dance with me

 
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Posted 14 October 2012 - 06:02 AM

I don't have coeliac disease or arthritis, my daughter has coeliac disease and Autism. Her father, grandfather, uncle and cousin have Autism. Her grandmother has coeliac disease, but of course is not the one who carried her. Not sure what to make of this particular piece?
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#12 ElseB

 
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Posted 14 October 2012 - 06:43 AM

As a woman with Celiac and Hashimotos who is considering having children in the next few years, I'm terrified to have children. With all of these autoimmune disesases, can I really produce a healthy child?
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#13 megsybeth

 
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Posted 14 October 2012 - 07:29 PM

I think this is really interesting and makes me kind of glad I had two births before my diagnosis, ElseB! But I'd like to throw another perspective out there. I do think part of the rise in autism rates has to do with some level of over-diagnosis. My son was diagnosed at 2 and a half with ASD by a Developmental Ped who believed in over-diagnosing so as not to miss anyone. The thing is, his major issues are motor delays (very clumsy) and poor eye contact because he has a very short attention span.

His mother is celiac but he is also celiac. So I also think some of the diagnoses of ASD and ADHD, maybe not a lot, but some, are misdiagnosed celiac which my son was for two years. My son is the kind of child who would rather make the puzzle pieces talk to each other than try to put them in the right spot, he's a social butterfly even if he bounces off the walls. But autism was the easiest label to put on him when he was younger and it helped us get services covered.

His old developmental ped is probably right that it's better to treat some kids for ASD than to miss others, but when it leads to doctors missing other serious medical issues like celiac, I do think we need to think about making doctors have a broader focus.
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#14 Alicia H

 
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Posted 04 October 2013 - 12:35 PM

Hi, I had the same reaction as Plumbago when I read the article -Were they talking about diagnosed or undiagnosed celiacs?  But I ended up reading the original research paper, which gives a little more clarity on this question.  It looks like increased risk is not true for diagnosed celiacs (meaning gluten free pregnant women).   Below is copied from the original research paper.  And I'll put the link to the paper below it.  To me, it's still a little unclear, but do you think that is what's being said here?

 

"Maternal diagnosis of celiac disease

was found to be associated with ASDs.
Previous studies have found associations between undiagnosed celiac disease in pregnancy and intrauterine
growth reduction of the fetus,33,34 low
birth weight,33,34 and early gestational
age,34 which also are risk factors for
ASDs.35 However, celiac disease diagnosed before pregnancy does not
seem to constitute a risk of adverse
fetal outcome, indicating the importance of treatment of pregnant women
with celiac disease.33,34"

 

http://pediatrics.aa.../2/687.full.pdf

 

Thanks, 

Alicia


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#15 kareng

 
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Posted 04 October 2013 - 12:57 PM

Hi, I had the same reaction as Plumbago when I read the article -Were they talking about diagnosed or undiagnosed celiacs?  But I ended up reading the original research paper, which gives a little more clarity on this question.  It looks like increased risk is not true for diagnosed celiacs (meaning gluten free pregnant women).   Below is copied from the original research paper.  And I'll put the link to the paper below it.  To me, it's still a little unclear, but do you think that is what's being said here?
 
"Maternal diagnosis of celiac disease
was found to be associated with ASDs.
Previous studies have found associations between undiagnosed celiac disease in pregnancy and intrauterine
growth reduction of the fetus,33,34 low
birth weight,33,34 and early gestational
age,34 which also are risk factors for
ASDs.35 However, celiac disease diagnosed before pregnancy does not
seem to constitute a risk of adverse
fetal outcome, indicating the importance of treatment of pregnant women
with celiac disease.33,34"
 
http://pediatrics.aa.../2/687.full.pdf
 
Thanks, 
Alicia




You might want to check out this more recent one.

http://www.celiac.co...celiac-disease/
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