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Gravy

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Is there a good brand of wheat/gluten free gravy at all? I did try bisto best but after eating it I am getting the same symptoms as I do when I eat wheat (bloating, vomiting, diarrhoea etc). It does not have wheat etc in the ingredients but does say that it's made on a production line that handles wheat. The rest of the meal was a fresh joint of pork that I had cooked myself and vegetables so I don't think they upset me.

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The best I found is mixes by Full Flavor Foods, I'm a gluten-free tester & by far these top the chart..Many varieties& flavors..You can order online ormany shops& stores carry this....

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I will look them up ty!

Also does anyone know if consuming wheat can cause a rash? To add to my stomach pain, vomiting, diarrhoea I now have a rash all over my stomach...

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I will look them up ty!

Also does anyone know if consuming wheat can cause a rash? To add to my stomach pain, vomiting, diarrhoea I now have a rash all over my stomach...

Some of us get a blistery itchy rash called DH from gluten. However if your symptoms don't improve soon you may want to call your doctor. You can also get the symptoms you are describing, including the rash, from food poisoning.

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Well the rash has faded this morning, the vomiting only happened the once after eating (vomiting is not one of my usual symptoms and the only other time I had that was after I took wheat and processed food out for a week and then had some weetabix...my stomach hit the eject button, but no rash that time...all the same i took the wheat and processed food back out again until the bisto...) and now I am back to the familiar ill feeling of feeling half hung over (even though I don't drink) and feeling like my body (but not my emotions) are in shock lol. Oh and a not so excited yay to the return of the acid reflux. The diarrhoea is still with me a bit but when I say diarrhoea I don't mean watery, I mean soft rancid smelling pale stools that today smell like....bisto!

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best off making it homemade. Take some drippings corn startch and milk and mix it all together in a sauce pan (unforcenently i do not know the mesurments for it, thats how my mom makes it :3).

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My mother made some homemade a couple of months ago. I was surprised, it was very delicious. I still don't remember what she used to make it since it really never came up again. Maybe I'll see if she even remembers. :lol:

Later,

Ray

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It's incredibly simple to make gravy. I have never bought gravy, in fact. After roasting whatever it is you are roasting, remove most of the fat, leaving a few tbsp in the pan, add a starch such as arrowroot or cornstarch (or even your favourite gluten-free flour - white rice flour works fine) and whisk in water and herbs and alcohol or whatever you use (cream for a cream gravy). Or simply make a roux out of butter and starch/flour before whisking in.

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You can also make "motherless gravy" if you haven't cooked any meat or the meat didn't make drippings. Make a blond roux with butter and gluten-free flour(melt butter , stir in flour and whisk for a few seconds to get rid of raw flour taste)Add a good beef or chicken gluten-free broth ( I use Emeril's) and whisk like mad as you add it. Correct seasoning with salt and pepper. Easy and much better than the mixes.

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Thanks; what is the proportion of butter to flour?

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Thanks; what is the proportion of butter to flour?

Corn starch makes great gravy.

In fact a lot of restaurants uses CS instead of flour.

Use the same portions of CS as you would flour however make sure you mix corn start WELL with warm water before putting it in the gravy. I use about 1 tbsp per 1/8 cup. Also boil the gravy for 2 minutes, the high temp over 2 minutes will get rid of any lingering flavor from the CS.

No one in our family could tell the difference.

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Corn starch makes great gravy.

In fact a lot of restaurants uses CS instead of flour.

Use the same portions of CS as you would flour however make sure you mix corn start WELL with warm water before putting it in the gravy. I use about 1 tbsp per 1/8 cup. Also boil the gravy for 2 minutes, the high temp over 2 minutes will get rid of any lingering flavor from the CS.

No one in our family could tell the difference.

I've had great success lately using potato starch. It's similar to cornstarch - just mix a tablespoon or two in about 1/4 cup of cold water. Mix well and slowly pour into simmering pan drippings or whatever you're using. Stir constantly until you reach the desired consistency. The leftovers don't seem to separate as readily as some gluten-free flours tend to do.

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Thanks; what is the proportion of butter to flour?

1 tablespoon butter / oil to 1 tablespoon flour to 1 cup liquid

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Thank you!

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Sticky rice flour (aka glutinous rice flour) - found in Asian supermarkets - is the secret weapon to GREAT gravy. Trust me, it works (just be sure to whisk it in a roux in the same way as you would do with wheat)... ;)

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Good thread, thanks! :) I've never in my life made gravy. Last holiday season (my first as a gluten free person) I just bought my usual jarred gravy for the family, and found one that was gluten free for me. Yeah, I know, jarred gravy.... :ph34r::rolleyes: But, I hate to cook, and I don't know how to cook! lol... However, it sounds easy enough to do by using chicken or beef stock. I don't think I'd know how to do it using pan drippings because I'd need exact measurements. I might just try it this year at Thanksgiving! :)

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I recently contacted B&G Foods (the manufacturer for Emeril's Stocks) and thought I'd give an update on threads mentioning them so we can have more recent information available:

 

 
On Tuesday, November 18, 2014 2:27 AM, "CorporateConsumerAffairs@bgfoods.com" <CorporateConsumerAffairs@bgfoods.com> wrote:


Dear Consumer,

 

The Emeril's Organic Chicken stock does not contain gluten. 

 

However, Emeril's Organic Stocks are produced in facilities that contain wheat and gluten ingredients. While every precaution is taken to avoid cross contamination, we cannot guarantee that they do not contain trace amounts of these ingredients from other products that are manufactured within the same manufacturing facility.

 

Corporate Consumer Affairs 
B&G Foods, Inc.

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I was trying to cook my first gluten free Thanksgiving meal last year while out of town, and gravy was troublesome...until I called mom, and she suggested just thickening the pan juices with instant potatoes.  It worked!  I use rice flour now or cornstarch, but in a pinch mix in the potatoes! 

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Our family loves gravy.  I use the water from the mashed potatoes to mix with the pan drippings.  I used to use Wondra, but can't any more, so I mix cornstarch with water before adding it to the drippings.  I think there are directions on the box but I just eyeball it.  I think it's 2 TBSP/cup of water???  1/4 cup maybe.  Bring the drippings/potato water to a boil and whisk in the cornstarch and water.  I also used to add bouillon cubes but I have to find some gluten-free ones.  I think Penzey's has a gluten-free bouillon base I need to try.  That gives the gravy a more rich taste.  You can probably use beef stock or chicken stock too but you will have to add more cornstarch.

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Our family loves gravy.  I use the water from the mashed potatoes to mix with the pan drippings.  I used to use Wondra, but can't any more, so I mix cornstarch with water before adding it to the drippings.  I think there are directions on the box but I just eyeball it.  I think it's 2 TBSP/cup of water???  1/4 cup maybe.  Bring the drippings/potato water to a boil and whisk in the cornstarch and water.  I also used to add bouillon cubes but I have to find some gluten-free ones.  I think Penzey's has a gluten-free bouillon base I need to try.  That gives the gravy a more rich taste.  You can probably use beef stock or chicken stock too but you will have to add more cornstarch.

 

On the cornstarch container (argo) they say to use 2 Tbsp per cup of liquid, but I like a thicker gravy so I add 3-4.  Massel makes gluten-free boullion, it can be hard to find, but it is really good.  I buy tons at a time when I go to the store that has it, because they are small and the expiration date is usually 3 years out or so.

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On the cornstarch container (argo) they say to use 2 Tbsp per cup of liquid, but I like a thicker gravy so I add 3-4.  Massel makes gluten-free boullion, it can be hard to find, but it is really good.  I buy tons at a time when I go to the store that has it, because they are small and the expiration date is usually 3 years out or so.

 

I'll have to keep an eye out for that.  I didn't think to look at the bouillon until I went to make gravy last week...good thing I double checked before adding it!

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