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Phila

Optimal Diet For Celiacs

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And I think fat was unfairly blamed for a lot of things that just aren't true (upon further study).

I agree, though I'd point out that there is a big difference between animal fat and plant fat, which has been largely overlooked. For instance, if you eat animal fats, you can end up with far less calcium being absorbed. Since dairy is animal based too, the calcium isn't as well derived as the dairy industry has led the consumer to believe. That's what I've found from my investigations.

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For me, I noticed I felt worse when I had meat. It even made my skin smell icky for days too. Didn't matter if it was red meat or poultry, though turkey had given less problems. I also would get dark around my eyes, and of course the gut didn't seem to like it either. When I think protein, I think peanuts, beans, spinach, etc.

To each his/her own obviously. I guess the particulars of the gut make each food go through differently from person to person. Lifestyle would make a difference too of course. I don't/can't work out, and the damage from gluten has got me far less active these days. So maybe I need less now, and easily overwhelm the gut with stuff? Can it be that easy to overdose on certain nutrients because of the leaky gut? Actually, in the case of leaky gut, I understand it's the undigested particles that get into the blood stream, which are essentially toxic. Now that makes some sense to me.

I had basically the opposite reaction. I lift weights, free weights like the guys do (in fact when I was sick, one of the guys made the comment "Takin' it easy today, you don't normally lift like a girl"). I needed more protein very badly. There's a picture of me taken 7 years ago that sits on my husband's dresser, and I look older than I do now. I had sunken eyes with bags under them and a puffy face. Now, I was not gluten/casein free back then, so I know that had something to do with my looks. In the picture I was 36, and the skin on my face looks as old as it does today at 43.

I seem to do best on the type diet Nancy mentions -- limiting grains.

My understanding is that when you haven't eaten meat for a long time, you don't have the acids in your stomach to digest them. So, if you had trouble adding them back, it may have been that you added too much, too soon and didn't wait till your body adjusted.

I'm not saying everyone needs to eat meat. Beans and peanuts neither one agree with me (peanuts because of the mold content) and with weight lifting, I'd have to eat an awful lot of spinach!!

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I agree, though I'd point out that there is a big difference between animal fat and plant fat, which has been largely overlooked. For instance, if you eat animal fats, you can end up with far less calcium being absorbed. Since dairy is animal based too, the calcium isn't as well derived as the dairy industry has led the consumer to believe. That's what I've found from my investigations.

That's one perspective, and like I said, I'm not a fan of dairy or the dairy industry...but human beings did evolve on saturated animal fats...

but I agree dairy is not by any means the most ideal source of calcium...

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My understanding is that when you haven't eaten meat for a long time, you don't have the acids in your stomach to digest them. So, if you had trouble adding them back, it may have been that you added too much, too soon and didn't wait till your body adjusted.

Yeah I'm certain that's true, not only for the stomach (perhaps you meant enzymes), but the rest of the gut.

In my case it was both long before, and during my transition to gluten-free. Like so many things, meat had been giving me problems which I didn't pinpoint/notice until the gut was more severely damaged. I suppose one day it may not effect me so badly, or may even help me feel better, though the last time I tried some it tasted aweful. Not having meat for a long time may make it less palatable. I was never a fan of it anyway, so it's no biggy to me if I never taste it again...accept I do recall fondly the aroma and flavor of sausage pizza/lasagna.

A bit before I went gluten-free was the last time I had any, though I was still having a small amount of dairy in the form of whey from margarine. I would later find it too seemed to contribute to certain problems I was experiencing at the time. I feared it was the soy, but I think I narrowed it down to casein.

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Yeah I'm certain that's true, not only for the stomach (perhaps you meant enzymes), but the rest of the gut.

In my case it was both long before, and during my transition to gluten-free. Like so many things, meat had been giving me problems which I didn't pinpoint/notice until the gut was more severely damaged. I suppose one day it may not effect me so badly, or may even help me feel better, though the last time I tried some it tasted aweful. Not having meat for a long time may make it less palatable. I was never a fan of it anyway, so it's no biggy to me if I never taste it again...accept I do recall fondly the aroma and flavor of sausage pizza/lasagna.

A bit before I went gluten-free was the last time I had any, though I was still having a small amount of dairy in the form of whey from margarine. I would later find it too seemed to contribute to certain problems I was experiencing at the time. I feared it was the soy, but I think I narrowed it down to casein.

Oh, yea, it would be enzymes ... duh.

I have a problem with casein, too. I miss my lattes! I know, I know, I'm better off without them, but I have very few vices!

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Guest BERNESES

Great thread!!!!!!!! I think the most important thing is to remember that while gluten is bad for ALL of us we all have different systems and needs.

For me, besides avoiding gluten, I also avoid legumes (soy, peanuts, all beans). It's a total bummer I miss my peanut butter and chocolate but the decrease in muscular pain is AMAZING. Prior to eliminating legumes I slept poorly, had much worse night sweats and incredible muscular pain.

I do dairy, grains like rice, quinoa in limited amounts. Avoid almost ALL processed foods and buy organic whenever I can. Limited sugra, limited alcohol (no grain based alcohols whatsoever).

I'm on the fence about supplements right now- all mine are gluten, corn, soy, dairy free- but something is still troubling my gut. can't quite figure it out.

Ahh... exercise (my missing link right now). I do best with flow yoga and ANYTHING outdoors. Flow yoga is good because the speed raises cardio a bit, but I get the stretching I need.

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...but human beings did evolve on saturated animal fats...

And unsaturated factory-processed vegetable oils are new to the human diet within the past 100 years.

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I agree that the same diet isn't right for everyone. This reminds me of a great book I read years ago by Dr Sherry A. Rogers called Wellness Against All Odds, she talked about how through her experiences she learned that even the process of healing called for a change in diet. She had always put her cancer patients on a macrobiotic diet and discovered that some thrived and others didn't. She put the ones who weren't thriving on a diet opposite of the principles of macrobiotics, high fat, high animal protein, etc. and they began to heal.

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Bully4You, about the lectin sensitivity, I have read up a bit on that, and I was wondering what veggies you mainly eat. While grains, legumes, dairy, and eggs have lectins, apparently things like broccoli, spinach, and tons of other things do too. I guess they aren't all the same type though. At least I hope not.

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Bully4You, about the lectin sensitivity, I have read up a bit on that, and I was wondering what veggies you mainly eat. While grains, legumes, dairy, and eggs have lectins, apparently things like broccoli, spinach, and tons of other things do too. I guess they aren't all the same type though. At least I hope not.

RiceGuy,

Ursula is also a good one to go to for info about lectins, she seems to be the expert in that department :)

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RiceGuy,

Ursula is also a good one to go to for info about lectins, she seems to be the expert in that department :)

Oooops, sorry Bully4You, I got some info mixed up as I've been pouring over so many allergy documents lately. The broccoli and spinach things was salicylates, not lectins.

And yeah, Ursula I'm also querying about this stuff.

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I'd have to point you to Ursula as well. I don't eat beans and grains, but I eat any and all veggies, especially the cabbagy ones that I think have lectins in them. There are different kinds of lectins, and different percentages of lectins in foods - I think grains are 20% or something like that. (But never trust me with numbers.)

I will say that I was VERY LOW on that body ecology diet. I dragged myself into the store the other day and bought one of those Amasaze (sp?) rice drinks - the almond one - it has 35g of carbs. It totally cured me, thank goodness. I'm still leaving out fruit for the remainder of the week, but if you cound how many carbs you're getting from nonstartchy veggies, it's shockingly little. Maybe Ursula has something to say about this too.

Good luck.

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I think you're mixing two of us together - I am not shy about fats at all, in fact, add olive oil to virtually every thing I eat. I also eat avocados quite frequently. The gal who has cut out most fats is doing so because her digestive tract can't handle it right now.

I did some research and it looks like this type of fatigue/muscle weakness is common when doing the no yeast thing - it is called the die-off phase or something, and having weakness is normal. However, I am going to keep track of my calories and stuff today, make sure I've got a good balance of acid/alkaline - expansive/contractive, protein/carbs, etc.

I thought of another one while reading a tip for recipes elsewhere on the site:

NO MARGARINE.

Transfats = evil. (The true axis of evil: transfats - corn-fed beef and cooked milk - and processed grains)

Raw butter is best, and then for cooking coconut oil (sesame oil too?)

noncooked: pumpkin oil, olive oil (virgin of course)

You'll probably feel better when some time has passed as you said. Have you tried anchovies? I get the ones at costco. I fix a salad and just open a can and put it on top. It seems to give me energy and it is good. I bought the book "The Perricone Promise" a while back to look younger and have his others. He is very big on the salmon. The wild salmon is sometimes hard to find so I rely alot on the anchovies for the omega 3's. This is an easy to carry food. LL

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I can't imagine what anchovies taste like? I likd ceasar dressing back in my dairy/garlic days - but always freaked out if there were actual anchovies on my salad. Are they the fishiest things ever? Do they make your breath weird? I almost bought some the other day from Italy in olive oil, but chickened out.

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i remember reading that almost ALL foods contain lectins but lectins are highest in legumes like soy, peanuts, beans. Actually, here's a link to an article:

http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/full/318/7190/1023

I cut them out about a month ago (legumes) and it has really helped. But still have a missing link.

Julie- I LOVE your new pic!!!

Thanks Berneses, I LOVE your new pic too :)

It seems to me also, that pretty much everything has lectins in it. I recall looking over the list thinking, what would one eat? Practically everything would have to be eliminated.

I can't imagine what anchovies taste like? I likd ceasar dressing back in my dairy/garlic days - but always freaked out if there were actual anchovies on my salad. Are they the fishiest things ever? Do they make your breath weird? I almost bought some the other day from Italy in olive oil, but chickened out.

We are all suppose to eat sardines, but I can't bring myself to. Just can't do it :(

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Excuse me for jumping in :)

But, Walmart supercenter has wild salmon for $3 a lb. It was $4 last month. It is frozen and divided into 4 -1/4 lb packages so it is really convenient. I like it, but I don't know if there is some sort of quality to look for other than wild <_<

I like sardines, but I need it on a cracker. Know of any good crackers ? And thanks for the tip on anchovies. I love the flavor, but never thought of just eating them. <_<

marcia

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I agree, though I'd point out that there is a big difference between animal fat and plant fat, which has been largely overlooked. For instance, if you eat animal fats, you can end up with far less calcium being absorbed. Since dairy is animal based too, the calcium isn't as well derived as the dairy industry has led the consumer to believe. That's what I've found from my investigations.

As far as I've read dairy actually leaches calcium from your bones. I'm a meat eater gone lacto ovo veg, gone ovo veg, gone vegan and back to meat again. We are also allergic to soy and some beans. We feel better back on the meat and only buy the grass fed beef and natural or organic chicken mainly. We do eat some wild salmon and turkey also. I think my daughter may be developing an allergy or something to rice to I'll need to try and revamp our diet. We have some form or rice with about every meal. We also need to work on adding more veggies which is challenging for me since the kids don't like very many of them.

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This is a wonderful thread, and it just shows that we are all so different.

Being away from home this last couple of weeks, and having someone else prepare my food, I thought I would be suffering, like I have been at home on an off. It would seem I would be fine for about four days, then have stomach problems for about the same length of time and so on.

But, being on a different diet, I have only had diahrhea once in 9 days, the rest of the days have been a breeze. I must remember to take my mum home with me tomorrow, as she is working a treat.

I have been drinking white wine, instead of the gin with lemonade or whatever at home. So while down here I have not been drinking fizzy drinks, only coffee, plain green teas, drinking chocolate and water. That must be fine, along with the wine. But I did have one drink of lime flavoured green tea, which I am sure caused my stomach problem.

I have been eating my rice/or corn crackers, and a loaf of home made gluten free bread, which does not use a yeast, but I normally eat that on ccassions , so that is fine. Been having soups as well, as it is winter

I still have been eating my meat and veggies for tea, and my rice porridge with home made yoghurt. (Easiyo's Greek honey yoghurt, which is the most natural I can find) I eat about three or four pieces of fruit, mainly kiwis (yellow ones, and they are not so biting) and apples, and of course that raw carrot I cannot get away from. No yummy treats for me, and even though it is the middle of winter I do not miss my comfort food.

What I have cut out would be the chocolate, and probably products with soy in them, dried fruit apart from the tiny amount in my cereal for breakfast, I have not had any peanut butter and minimal amounts of legumes, and I have not had any flavours (apart from the green tea) and added colours in processed foods. So I am beginning to wonder whether I am getting it right for myself at last. I know it is not the healthiest diet, and that is rich coming from me, as I thought I knew what healthy was until I had to change my way of eating.I still feel I have a long way to go, but am feeling I am now getting ahead in my diet. I only hope when I get home, tomorrow I will be able to keep away from the things I have recently dropped, particularly the chocolate.

Cathy

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In the post I quoted, you said that you were eating 80% vegetables and 20% protein. I added that up to 100% and concluded that there was 0% fat in your diet.

Margarine is not a food, but a product of a chemical factory.

aha - math...something I avoid. I guess I meant more visually - my plate has about 80% veggies on it, and about 20% protein on it. Never mind the 25% olive oil. Yum!

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I can't imagine what anchovies taste like? I likd ceasar dressing back in my dairy/garlic days - but always freaked out if there were actual anchovies on my salad. Are they the fishiest things ever? Do they make your breath weird? I almost bought some the other day from Italy in olive oil, but chickened out.

I was like you until the book. Now, it is one of my favorites. It is filling and good and gives me energy plus it is brain food. (I need that). I buy the King Oscar Flat Fillets of anchovies in pure olive oil. I just make a romaine salad with celery, onion, carrots,raw walnuts, garlic or garlic powder, salt and pepper (whatever I have) with a little olive oil and raw apple cider vinegar. When ready to eat just add the anchovies. Good with gluten-free chips, tostados or crackers. Try a half can first. You can use the other half in salad dressing or something heated later. I don't think they smell as strong as tuna. They are salty so hold the salt to taste. I like salty things.I buy mine at costco. LindaLee

Thanks Berneses, I LOVE your new pic too :)

It seems to me also, that pretty much everything has lectins in it. I recall looking over the list thinking, what would one eat? Practically everything would have to be eliminated.

We are all suppose to eat sardines, but I can't bring myself to. Just can't do it :(

Sardines- Does anyone have a good recipe? I haven't found one. LLee

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I like sardines, but I need it on a cracker. Know of any good crackers ?

marcia

Me too! I never thought saltines would figure on my craving list, but I realize that I always ate them with tuna & sardines... I just don't like plain tinned fish much without them, & I don't really know why! (I also always have to drink V-8 with them-- I guess I am a creature of habit-- but luckily I can still do that!)

I like rice cakes & crackers, almond thins & so on, but I'd love something more like the old saltines to eat my fish on. Any ideas, folks?

Leah

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I buy the King Oscar Flat Fillets of anchovies in pure olive oil.

I basically adhere to the idea of never eating anything that had eyes. Ugh!

I never thought saltines would figure on my craving list...

<SNIP>

I like rice cakes & crackers, almond thins & so on, but I'd love something more like the old saltines to eat my fish on. Any ideas, folks?

I could go for Triscuits :) The texture of which I haven't really figured a substitute for yet. I'm sure it's possible to get a fairly nice tasting faximile though. For saltines, I guess something light, so maybe tapioca flour or potato flour would be a starting point. I haven't tried baking gluten-free stuff yet. It's gonna be awhile before I'm well enough to start experimenting with "fun food". Right now I just gotta get the gut healed first.

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I don't eat the yolks because I have trouble digesting the fat. Fat seems to be just as hard for me to digest as dairy... and almost as hard as gluten, although it doesn't do permanent damage like gluten does.

If I could only eat normal amounts of fat, I certainly wouldn't mind being Gluten-free Casein-free.

I like to say life change instead of diet....For me diet has always had a failure note attached....So I now say I am going to make a life change....And I think having a strong sence of spirituality is so important in living healthy as well.

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