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Gluten-Free For The Entire Famly? When Members Can't/don't Want To Be Gluten-Free

childrengluten free husband family diet home celiac

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#16 RainKitty

 
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Posted 14 August 2014 - 12:43 AM

Has your daughter been tested. Celiac runs in families.

 
No. Our pediatrician told us not to test without symptoms. I am aware that there is controversy about this, and want to get her tested, but I'm not even sure they would without symptoms. I was diagnosed after years of all sorts of symptoms, including IBS that didn't get better, but was overweight, so was told that I couldn't have Celiac. I did, though, for many years. At the time I was tested, I had had symptoms for about 15 years, back to when I was pregnant with one of my older children. I was finally tested after surgery for my gall bladder. The surgeon told me that she only ever saw gall bladders like mine in people with "sprue" and sent me for tests. I am not sure to this day what she saw, but she was 10% right. I tested positive. For a long time after I stopped eating gluten, milk bothered me, too, but I seem to be mostly okay with milk now in small doses.
 
My sister has Lupus and our mother had arthritis, and my dad had a skin condition that looked a lot like mild psoriasis - all of which are inflammatory/auto-immune diseases. The more I think about it, the more I want to get the kids tested.

If it were me, I'd do as some of the others suggested and let her eat gluten as long as she is careful and makes her sandwiches in a different area AND learns to clean up after herself. Dedicated peanut butter and other condiments are a must.

 
I've decided to go with the duct tape idea (above) and will be teaching her better kitchen technique. I don't want to force her to eat gluten-free, but we have to do something.

I say all this because even if she has been tested and the tests were negative, she should be tested every (I think they say) couple of years. If she is off gluten she will never be able to get an accurate test and that would interfere with that 504 (?) plan for school. You might have a hard time getting the school, summer camps, etc. to take it seriously.

 
She has her annual pediatrician visit in early November, so I think I will ask then. She is our baby, and our older children are in college/graduated college. I will be asking the, to test, too.

Thank you!
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#17 heatman

 
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Posted 30 September 2014 - 05:27 PM

I would love some advise on the shared kitchen too. I've been gluten-free since April and am slowly learning just how uber careful I need to be to avoid getting sick. It's such hard detective work to figure out what makes me sick each time I get glutened. My husband, although sorry to see me suffer, does not want to change his eating habits. He eats 1.5 loaves of bread a week (sandwiches and toast) and goes through a box of Cheerios a week. I don't mind his beer or granola bars because those seem less messy. When he's at work I feed my 2yo gluten-free but when he feeds her he gives her gluten as does our sitter. I also have gluten snacks for her that he and our babysitter give her (although I plan to phase those out). I am very cautious about washing my hands before eating because I think about all the gluten residue spread all over my house on a regular basis but it's near impossible to really keep from cc when I'm hyper sensitive right now. I would love to have a gluten-free house but gluten-free breads just aren't the same and imagine how expensive that would get! Any suggestions?
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#18 JodyM75

 
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Posted 02 October 2014 - 11:07 AM

The Gluten Dude did a post on kitchen "safety":  http://glutendude.co...-free-kitchens/

 

It's interesting to see how others handle the issue.


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#19 cap6

 
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Posted 07 October 2014 - 08:44 AM

 Having had both a shared kitchen and a gluten free kitchen I am going with the gluten free kitchen.  Almost anything can be found gluten free.  Crackers?  Get rice.  Bread?  Ok, I agree g.f. is a pricey substitute, but do you really need bread?  Lettuce roll ups make great lunches and are far healthier than bread.  Four years down the gluten free road and I find I have an entire different mind set to when I first started out.  Kids can have their treats, just make them g.f.  It's so much easier and safer. 


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#20 NoWhammies

 
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Posted 07 October 2014 - 09:44 AM

I found that my gluten-free kitchen became much easier to maintain once my son went away to college. My stepson still comes down a few weekends a month, but we've segregated a counter, a cupboard, and a drawer (all in the same area) for gluten prep, foods, appliances, and utensils. When the kids are home, I cook gluten-free. It's the way hubby and I eat, so the kids can live with it. The foods are still delicious and nourishing. 

 

It was more difficult when the kids were smaller. Gluten was everywhere all the time. Now that they are 16 and 18, they are old enough to follow the gluten-free rules and not contaminate me.


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#21 heatman

 
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Posted 07 October 2014 - 10:10 AM

Thanks so much for the advise. I think it will take time to get my husband on board. I can only imagine how hard it is for a spouse of someone with celiac because of how drastically things change once diagnosed. He is getting better about cleaning up after himself in his gluten-designated area. My 2 yo daughter, however, is the greater challenge when given gluten bc she doesn't understand why she can't put her food on my plate, feed me or kiss me after eating gluten. Luckily she doesn't have it that often since she's just with me most of the time. I never dreamed how hard this would be!
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#22 BlessedMommy

 
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Posted 07 October 2014 - 10:21 AM

I'm pretty much counting down the days until my daughter's date for bloodwork. I can't wait to get rid of the gluten in the house again!

 

My 2 year old is one of the hardest, because she will put her hands up to my face and try to touch my mouth.


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~Ruth

Gluten free since 2/14/2010 after suffering a rare and serious complication from my gluten challenge

 

 

 

 

 

 


#23 heatman

 
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Posted 07 October 2014 - 11:01 AM

its okay for children to be (mostly, at least in the house) gluten free even if they don't have issues with gluten, right?
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#24 cyclinglady

 
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Posted 07 October 2014 - 12:15 PM

Why not? Eating alternative gluten-free grains is healthy! Wheat, rye and barley are just a small part of edible foods, it is just that our society has depended so much those particular grains (really just wheat). My daughter gets her gluten outside of the house. She washes her hands when she returns home.

But, she has been tested. So, even before she was tested I gave her gluten daily, usually at lunch while at school or when we are out of the house. She will need to be tested every few years or sooner if she displays obvious symptoms. Odds are, she will develop celiac disease since both parents have it.

I was only diagnosed less than two years ago, but hubby has been gluten-free for 13 years. I was careful, but I know we glutened him. Who could resist toddler kisses? But it was so much easier on me mentally to make the house really gluten free after my diagnosis.

Good luck to you!
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#25 beth01

 
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Posted 07 October 2014 - 06:08 PM

RainKitty, if you want to have your children tested, ask for the tests. If the doctor says no, get a new one or ask the doctor for a valid reason why you shouldn't have your daughter tested now to make sure she isn't positive if it can save her a life time of misery from a GENETIC disease. She should be tested every two years anyway and so should your other children. My doctor didn't want to test my daughter when we had just gone through almost a year of her fainting a lot at school and many tests, I insisted. She was positive. I also now have a different doctor for myself and my children.

Good luck , and I hope you start feeling better soon.
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#26 Nikki2777

 
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Posted 09 October 2014 - 07:38 AM

I have a 9 year old and a 13 year old.  And a 45 year old (husband).  I have my own cutting board (different color) and wash all pots and pans again before using them (I actually did this before dx - like them to be freshly clean).  Kids know to spoon things onto their plate before using/spreading them.  I do have my own butter, soy sauce, etc.  Also kids know to wash their hands before reaching into shared snacks (good hygeine anyway).

 

I confess I do make them sandwiches for their lunches, on their cutting board, and I wash my hands afterwards.  I don't think I've gotten any gluten this way, but I can't say for sure.  It's the only way I can be sure they get a decent lunch.

 

We sometimes slip up, but I think I've caught any potential problems before getting glutened.  Except once when I cleaned up their pizza crumbs/dust, and once when my husband kissed me after eating pizza!


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#27 Purpletie3

 
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Posted 22 October 2014 - 03:25 PM

Hi-

   I think the thing to figure out is what works best for your family. The first thing I did when I was diagnosed was to clean the whole house of gluten, wheat, barley, rye & oats. Then I realized that my boyfriend really does enjoy taking 4 PBJ sandwiches in his lunch bucket and that is a whole loaf of gluten-free bread ($6.50 not in the budget)...

 

So, he is just banished to his own table to make his sandwiches and he has his own jar of peanut butter and jelly he can dip in. Other than that our house is gluten-free and I cook strictly gluten-free...threw away all the old non stick pans, plastic serving spatula, toaster etc...   However, we do have separate sponges in case he wipes his crumbs down. This works for us...he's happy because I cook all the time and I am happy because I am not getting contaminated.  My daughter eats whatever is put in front of her and loves my whole cooking.

 

Best of luck to you with this new change...trial and error here!


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#28 heatman

 
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Posted 22 October 2014 - 04:36 PM

Thanks for your thoughts on a shared kitchen. It's crazy just how sensitive I am with being new to gluten-free. This weekend we had a birthday party which was all gluten-free (I found great cupcake recipes) except for beer. I must have gotten a drop in my food because I got sick (not bad though). I tossed all my old plastic and silicone kitchen ware and that seems to have helped a lot. I feel like the going gluten-free process is like unpeeling an onion. Every month I figure out one more layer that needs to come off!
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#29 BlessedMommy

 
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Posted 05 November 2014 - 05:17 PM

I've gone back to a gluten free kitchen now that my daughter's gluten challenge is done and boy, is it ever a stress reliever! 

 

Here's some pointers on cooking gluten free for a whole family, when only one person needs to be gluten free. I'm the only G.F. person in my house at present.

 

First of all, focus on basics. Nuts, fruits, veggies, eggs, dried beans, plain soy products, plain meats, etc.

 

For grains, find some basic versatile inexpensive grain/starch options that everybody enjoys. White basmati rice (we buy in a 20 lb bag at Sam's Club for $21), white rice noodles, corn pasta, corn/quinoa pasta, potatoes, sweet potatoes, and gluten free rolled oats (we buy them in bulk for $1.63 a pound) are popular choices in our house. The corn pasta is available at Aldi for $1.29 a pound or at our regular grocery for $1.99 a pound. 

 

Focus on basic meals that are easy to make gluten free. A favorite at our house is stir fry. We love the certified G.F. San-J options for sauces and soy sauce. Other crowd pleasing options are really easy to make gluten free, like tater tot casserole. Scrambled eggs and oven roasted potatoes is a favorite breakfast. My gluten eaters and I also regularly eat homemade whole grain gluten free waffles. (super easy to whip up!)

 

Bread is probably too expensive to make the center of your diet, but you don't necessarily have to go without, either. I have a scratch made recipe that pleases my gluten eaters or I whip up a loaf of Pamela's bread mix. Pamela's bread mix also makes great bagels. 

 

For treats, gluten free baking is pretty easy to figure out and often you can make treats that can't be distinguished from their glutenous counterparts. There are also many gluten free premade options like ice cream, fruit sorbet, popsicles, potato chips, etc.

 

I've also had good luck buying gluten free foods for cheaper at our Amish salvage stores.

 

Keep in mind that you're not actually telling anybody that they must go gluten free, but only that they need to eat their gluten at restaurants, friends' houses, potlucks, etc. instead of home.


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~Ruth

Gluten free since 2/14/2010 after suffering a rare and serious complication from my gluten challenge

 

 

 

 

 

 


#30 Zebra007

 
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Posted 05 November 2014 - 05:50 PM

I don't really understand clearly what happens when you become "contaminated" in the kitchen, is the Gluten a tiny tiny crumb that once ingested makes you ill? what exactly does it looks like?  And if you become ill from it what are your symptoms, and are they immediate?

 

I hope someone can explain this to me as I have been giving my dog bread and butter for his supper every night without much thought.


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